Chapter IX


The origin and descent of Captain Henry Morgan
His exploits, and the most remarkable actions of his life.


CAPTAIN HENRY MORGAN was born in Great Britain, in the principality of Wales; his father was a rich yeoman, or farmer, of good quality, even as most who bear that name in Wales are known to be. Morgan, when young, had no inclination to the calling of his father, and therefore left his country, and came towards the sea-coasts to seek some other employment more suitable to his aspiring humour; where he found several ships at anchor, bound for Barbadoes. With these he resolved to go in the service of one, who, according to the practice of those parts, sold him as soon as he came ashore. He served his time at Barbadoes, and obtaining his liberty, betook himself to Jamaica, there to seek new fortunes: here he found two vessels of pirates ready to go to sea; and being destitute of employment, he went with them, with intent to follow the exercises of that sort of people: he soon learned their manner of living, so exactly, that having performed three or four voyages with profit and success, he agreed with some of his comrades, who had got by the same voyages a little money, to join stocks, and buy a ship. The vessel being bought, they unanimously chose him captain and commander.

With this ship he set forth from Jamaica to cruise on the coasts of Campechy, in which voyage he took several ships, with which he returned triumphant. Here he found an old pirate, named Mansvelt (whom we have already mentioned), busied in equipping a considerable fleet, with design to land on the continent, and pillage whatever he could. Mansvelt seeing Captain Morgan return with so many prizes, judged him to be a man of courage, and chose him for his vice-admiral in that expedition: thus having fitted out fifteen ships, great and small, they sailed from Jamaica with five hundred men, Walloons and French. This fleet arrived, not long after, at the isle of St. Catherine, near the continent of Costa Rica, latitude 12 deg. 30 min. and distant thirty-five leagues from the river Chagre. Here they made their first descent, landing most of their men, who soon forced the garrison that kept the island to surrender all the forts and castles thereof; which they instantly demolished, except one, wherein they placed a hundred men of their own party, and all the slaves they had taken from the Spaniards: with the rest of their men they marched to another small island, so near St. Catherine's, that with a bridge they made in a few days, they passed thither, taking with them all the ordnance they had taken on the great island. Having ruined with fire and sword both the islands, leaving necessary orders at the said castle, they put to sea again, with their Spanish prisoners; yet these they set ashore not long after, on the firm land, near Puerto Velo: then they cruised on Costa Rica, till they came to the river Colla, designing to pillage all the towns in those parts, thence to pass to the village of Nata, to do the same.

The governor of Panama, on advice of their arrival, and of the hostilities they committed, thought it his duty to meet them with a body of men. His coming caused the pirates to retire suddenly, seeing the whole country was alarmed, and that their designs were known, and consequently defeated at that time. Hereupon, they returned to St. Catherine's, to visit the hundred men they left in garrison there. The governor of these men was a Frenchman, named Le Sieur Simon, who behaved himself very well in that charge, while Mansvelt was absent, having put the great island in a very good posture of defence, and the little one he had caused to be cultivated with many fertile plantations, sufficient to revictual the whole fleet, not only for the present, but also for a new voyage. Mansvelt was very much bent to keep the two islands in perpetual possession, being very commodiously situated for the pirates; being so near the Spanish dominions, and easily defended.

Hereupon, Mansvelt determined to return to Jamaica, to send recruits to St. Catherine's, that in case of an invasion the pirates might be provided for a defence. As soon as he arrived, he propounded his intentions to the governor there, who rejected his propositions, fearing to displease his master, the king of England; besides, that giving him the men he desired, and necessaries, he must of necessity diminish the forces of that island, whereof he was governor. Hereupon, Mansvelt, knowing that of himself he could not compass his designs, he went to Tortuga; but there, before he could put in execution what was intended, death surprised him, and put a period to his wicked life, leaving all things in suspense till the occasion I shall hereafter relate.

Le Sieur Simon, governor of St. Catherine's, receiving no news from Mansvelt, his admiral, was impatiently desirous to know the cause thereof: meanwhile, Don John Perez de Guzman, being newly come to the government of Costa Rica, thought it not convenient for the interest of Spain for that island to be in the hands of the pirates: hereupon, he equipped a considerable fleet, which he sent to retake it; but before he used violence, he writ a letter to Le Sieur Simon, telling him, that if he would surrender the island to his Catholic Majesty, he should be very well rewarded; but, in case of refusal, severely punished, when he had forced him to do it. Le Sieur Simon, seeing no probability of being able to defend it alone, nor any emolument that by so doing could accrue either to him, or his people, after some small resistance delivered it up to its true lord and master, under the same articles they had obtained it from the Spaniards; a few days after which surrender, there arrived from Jamaica an English ship, which the governor there had sent underhand, with a good supply of people, both men and women: the Spaniards from the castle having espied the ship, put forth English colours, and persuaded Le Sieur Simon to go aboard, and conduct the ship into a port they assigned him. This he performed and they were all made prisoners. A certain Spanish engineer has published in print an exact relation of the retaking of this isle by the Spaniards, which I have thought fit to insert here:—

A true relation, and particular account of the victory obtained by the arms of his Catholic Majesty against the English pirates, by the direction and valour of Don John Perez de Guzman, knight of the order of St. James, governor and captain-general of Terra Firma, and the Province of Veraguas.

The kingdom of Terra Firma, which of itself is sufficiently strong to repel and destroy great fleets, especially the pirates of Jamaica, had several ways notice imparted to the governor thereof, that fourteen English vessels cruised on the coasts belonging to his Catholic Majesty. July 14, 1665, news came to Panama, that they were arrived at Puerto de Naos, and had forced the Spanish garrison of the isle of St. Catherine, whose governor was Don Estevan del Campo, and possessed themselves of the said island, taking prisoners the inhabitants, and destroying all that they met. About the same time, Don John Perez de Guzman received particular information of these robberies from some Spaniards who escaped out of the island (and whom he ordered to be conveyed to Puerto Velo), that the said pirates came into the island May 2, by night, without being perceived; and that the next day, after some skirmishes, they took the fortresses, and made prisoners all the inhabitants and soldiers that could not escape. Upon this, Don John called a council of war, wherein he declared the great progress the said pirates had made in the dominions of his Catholic Majesty; and propounded "that it was absolutely necessary to send some forces to the isle of St. Catherine, sufficient to retake it from the pirates, the honour and interest of his Majesty of Spain being very narrowly concerned herein; otherwise the pirates by such conquests might easily, in course of time, possess themselves of all the countries thereabouts." To this some made answer, "that the pirates, not being able to subsist in the said island, would of necessity consume and waste themselves, and be forced to quit it, without any necessity of retaking it: that consequently it was not worth the while to engage in so many expenses and troubles as this would cost." Notwithstanding which, Don John being an expert and valiant soldier, ordered that provisions should be conveyed to Puerto Velo for the use of the militia, and transported himself thither, with no small danger of his life. Here he arrived July 2, with most things necessary to the expedition in hand, where he found in the port a good ship, and well mounted, called the St. Vincent, that belonged to the company of the negroes, which he manned and victualled very well, and sent to the isle of St. Catherine, constituting Captain Joseph Sanchez Ximenez, major of Puerto Velo, commander thereof. He carried with him two hundred and seventy soldiers, and thirty-seven prisoners of the same island, besides thirty-four Spaniards of the garrison of Puerto Velo, twenty-nine mulattoes of Panama, twelve Indians, very dextrous at shooting with bows and arrows, seven expert and able gunners, two lieutenants, two pilots, one surgeon, and one priest, of the order of St. Francis, for their chaplain.

Don John soon after gave orders to all the officers how to behave themselves, telling them that the governor of Carthagena would supply them with more men, boats, and all things else, necessary for that enterprise; to which effect he had already written to the said governor. July 24, Don John setting sail with a fair wind, he called before him all his people, and made them a speech, encouraging them to fight against the enemies of their country and religion, and especially against those inhuman pirates, who had committed so many horrid cruelties upon the subjects of his Catholic Majesty; withal, promising every one most liberal rewards, especially to such as should behave themselves well in the service of their king and country. Thus Don John bid them farewell, and the ship set sail under a favourable gale. The 22nd they arrived at Carthagena, and presented a letter to the governor thereof, from the noble and valiant Don John, who received it with testimonies of great affection to the person of Don John, and his Majesty's service: and seeing their resolution to be comfortable to his desires, he promised them his assistance, with one frigate, one galleon, one boat, and one hundred and twenty-six men; one half out of his own garrison, and the other half mulattoes. Thus being well provided with necessaries, they left the port of Carthagena, August 2, and the 10th they arrived in sight of St. Catherine's towards the western point thereof; and though the wind was contrary, yet they reached the port, and anchored within it, having lost one of their boats by foul weather, at the rock called Quita Signos.

The pirates, seeing our ships come to an anchor, gave them presently three guns with bullets, which were soon answered in the same coin. Hereupon, Major Joseph Sanchez Ximenez sent ashore to the pirates one of his officers to require them, in the name of the Catholic King his master, to surrender the island, seeing they had taken it in the midst of peace between the two crowns of Spain and England; and that if they would be obstinate, he would certainly put them all to the sword. The pirates made answer, that the island had once before belonged unto the government and dominions of the king of England, and that instead of surrendering it, they preferred to lose their lives.

On Friday the 13th, three negroes, from the enemy, came swimming aboard our admiral; these brought intelligence that all the pirates upon the island were only seventy-two in number, and that they were under a great consternation, seeing such considerable forces come against them. With this intelligence, the Spaniards resolved to land, and advance towards the fortresses, which ceased not to fire as many great guns against them as they possibly could; which were answered in the same manner on our side, till dark night. On Sunday, the 15th, the day of the Assumption of our Lady, the weather being very calm and clear, the Spaniards began to advance thus: The ship St. Vincent, riding admiral, discharged two whole broadsides on the battery called the Conception; the ship St. Peter, that was vice-admiral, discharged likewise her guns against the other battery named St. James: meanwhile, our people landed in small boats, directing their course towards the point of the battery last mentioned, and thence they marched towards the gate called Cortadura. Lieutenant Francis de Cazeres, being desirous to view the strength of the enemy, with only fifteen men, was compelled to retreat in haste, by reason of the great guns, which played so furiously on the place where he stood; they shooting, not only pieces of iron, and small bullets, but also the organs of the church, discharging in every shot threescore pipes at a time.

Notwithstanding this heat of the enemy, Captain Don Joseph Ramirez de Leyva, with sixty men, made a strong attack, wherein they fought on both sides very desperately, till at last he overcame, and forced the pirates to surrender the fort.

On the other side, Captain John Galeno, with ninety men, passed over the hills, to advance that way towards the castle of St. Teresa. Meanwhile Major Don Joseph Sanchez Ximenes, as commander-in-chief, with the rest of his men, set forth from the battery of St. James, passing the port with four boats, and landing, in despite of the enemy. About this same time, Captain John Galeno began to advance with the men he led to the forementioned fortress; so that our men made three attacks on three several sides, at one and the same time, with great courage; till the pirates seeing many of their men already killed, and that they could in no manner subsist any longer, retreated towards Cortadura, where they surrendered, themselves and the whole island, into our hands. Our people possessed themselves of all, and set up the Spanish colours, as soon as they had rendered thanks to God Almighty for the victory obtained on such a signalized day. The number of dead were six men of the enemies, with many wounded, and seventy prisoners: on our side was only one man killed, and four wounded.

There were found on the island eight hundred pounds of powder, two hundred and fifty pounds of small bullets, with many other military provisions. Among the prisoners were taken also, two Spaniards, who had bore arms under the English against his Catholic Majesty: these were shot to death the next day, by order of the major. The 10th day of September arrived at the isle an English vessel, which being seen at a great distance by the major, he ordered Le Sieur Simon, who was a Frenchman, to go and visit the said ship, and tell them that were on board, that the island belonged still to the English. He performed the command, and found in the said ship only fourteen men, one woman and her daughter, who were all instantly made prisoners.

The English pirates were all transported to Puerto Velo, excepting three, who by order of the governor were carried to Panama, there to work in the castle of St. Jerom. This fortification is an excellent piece of workmanship, and very strong, being raised in the middle of the port of a quadrangular form, and of very hard stone: its height is eighty-eight geometrical feet, the wall being fourteen, and the curtains seventy-five feet diameter. It was built at the expense of several private persons, the governor of the city furnishing the greatest part of the money; so that it cost his Majesty nothing.

Chapter XII

The pirates of Panama or The buccaneers of America : Chapter XII

Captain Morgan takes the city of Maracaibo on the coast of Neuva Venezuela Piracies committed in those seas Ruin of three Spanish ships, set forth to hinder the robberies of the pirates. NOT long after their arrival at Jamaica, being that short time they needed to lavish away all the riches above mentioned, they concluded on another enterprise to seek new fortunes: to this effect Captain Morgan ordered all the commanders of his ships to meet at De la Vacca, or the Cow Isle, south of Hispaniola, as is said. Hither flocked to them great numbers of other pirates, French and English; the name of Captain Morgan being now famous in all the neighbouring countries for his great enterprises. There was then at Jamaica an English ship newly come from New England, well mounted with thirty-six guns: this vessel, by order of the governor of Jamaica, joined Captain Morgan to strengthen his fleet, and give him greater courage to attempt mighty things. With this supply Captain Morgan judged himself sufficiently strong; but there being in the same place another great vessel of twenty-four iron guns, and twelve brass ones, belonging to the French, Captain Morgan endeavoured also to join this ship to his own; but the French not daring to trust the English, denied absolutely to consent. The French pirates belonging to this great ship had met at sea an English vessel; and being under great want of victuals, they had taken some provisions out of the English ship, without paying for them, having, perhaps, no ready money aboard: only they gave them bills of exchange for Jamaica and Tortuga, to receive money there.

Chapter IV

The pirates of Panama or The buccaneers of America : Chapter IV

Original of the most famous pirates of the coasts of America Famous exploit of Pierre le Grand. I HAVE told you in the preceding chapters how I was compelled to adventure my life among the pirates of America; which sort of men I name so, because they are not authorized by any sovereign prince: for the kings of Spain having on several occasions sent their ambassadors to the kings of England and France, to complain of the molestations and troubles those pirates often caused on the coasts of America, even in the calm of peace; it hath always been answered, "that such men did not commit those acts of hostility and piracy as subjects to their majesties; and therefore his Catholic Majesty might proceed against them as he should think fit." The king of France added, "that he had no fortress nor castle upon Hispaniola, neither did he receive a farthing of tribute from thence." And the king of England adjoined, "that he had never given any commissions to those of Jamaica, to commit hostilities against the subjects of his Catholic Majesty." Nor did he only give this bare answer, but out of his royal desire to pleasure the court of Spain, recalled the governor of Jamaica, placing another in his room; all which could not prevent these pirates from acting as heretofore. But before I relate their bold actions, I shall say something of their rise and exercises; as also of the chiefest of them, and their manner of arming themselves before they put to sea. The first pirate that was known upon Tortuga was Pierre le Grand, or Peter the Great. He was born at Dieppe in Normandy.

IV. Арабская сказка на советский лад

Побег из ГУЛАГа. Часть 1. IV. Арабская сказка на советский лад

Зима голодная, холодная и темная была ужасно. Пришлось остаться в Павловске, в одной комнате, потому что здесь все же легче было доставать дрова. Существование людей свелось к такой нужде, какую, может быть, не знал пещерный человек, ибо он был приспособлен к тому, чтобы не умереть с голоду и не замерзнуть, мы же, интеллигенты, принужденные по-прежнему работать в требовательных интеллектуальных областях, были бессильны и беспомощны. Человек в драном пальто, для тепла подвязанный веревкой, в обутках, сшитых из старого ковра, с потрескавшимися от холода и топки железной печурки пальцами, с нервным, бегающим, голодным взглядом, был совсем не нищий, а чаще всего профессор или даже академик. Жены были не лучше. Ребятишки — истощены до последней степени. Я знала малыша, двух-трех лет, он понял, как трудно терпеть голод, и научился не доедать сразу и прятать корки под шкап, в игрушки, под ковер. Он не всегда их находил, плакал, но никому не открывал своего секрета, пока в бессильной обиде не пожаловался матери.

The Effects of a Global Thermonuclear War

Wm. Robert Johnston: Last updated 18 August 2003

4th edition: escalation in 1988 By Wm. Robert Johnston. Last updated 18 August 2003. Introduction The following is an approximate description of the effects of a global nuclear war. For the purposes of illustration it is assumed that a war resulted in mid-1988 from military conflict between the Warsaw Pact and NATO. This is in some ways a worst-case scenario (total numbers of strategic warheads deployed by the superpowers peaked about this time; the scenario implies a greater level of military readiness; and impact on global climate and crop yields are greatest for a war in August). Some details, such as the time of attack, the events leading to war, and the winds affecting fallout patterns, are only meant to be illustrative. This applies also to the global geopolitical aftermath, which represents the author's efforts at intelligent speculation. There is much public misconception concerning the physical effects of nuclear war--some of it motivated by politics. Certainly the predictions described here are uncertain: for example, casualty figures in the U.S. are accurate perhaps to within 30% for the first few days, but the number of survivors in the U.S. after one year could differ from these figures by as much as a factor of four. Nonetheless, there is no reasonable basis for expecting results radically different from this description--for example, there is no scientific basis for expecting the extinction of the human species. Note that the most severe predictions concerning nuclear winter have now been evaluated and discounted by most of the scientific community. Sources supplying the basis for this description include the U.S.

Глава 15

Борьба за Красный Петроград. Глава 15

После оставления Гатчины Северо-западная армия отходила на ямбургские и гдовские позиции. Для полного разгрома противника необходимо было продолжать энергичное наступление. Красной армии, однако, для достижения этой задачи необходимо было преодолевать целый ряд вновь возникавших трудностей. Спешность организации при тяжелых условиях борьбы за Петроград боевых групп Красной армии, усталость бойцов в результате непрерывных боев, расстройство с доставкой продовольствия и боевых припасов, недостаток перевозочных средств и т.д. — все это препятствовало быстрому движению и маневренным действиям Красной армии. Пользуясь этим, противник получил некоторую возможность сохранения своих расстроенных рядов и даже приводил их в порядок для организации отпора советским частям. После занятия Луги части 15-й армии устремились в направлении на Гдов. Из боевых событий в этом районе заслуживают внимания операции в тылу у белых красной [516] кавалерийской группы. Группа была сформирована к 31 октября из двух полков — кавалерийского полка 11-й стрелковой дивизии и Эстонского кавалерийского полка {488}. Группа получила боевое задание произвести налет на тылы белых в гдовском направлении и при возможности захватить Гдов. В ночь на 3 ноября, в 4 часа 30 минут утра, кавалерийская группа выступила в поход из района своего расположения у погоста Лосицкий, лесной дорогой добралась до дер. Сербино, находившейся в тылу белых на 12 километров, и заняла ее. Дальше группа направилась к дер. Гостичево, выдавая себя за белых.

Таблица 2а

Короли подплава в море червонных валетов. Приложение. Таблица 2а. Сроки постройки и службы советских подводных лодок 1927–1941 гг.

Сроки постройки и службы советских подводных лодок 1927–1941 гг. Названия, типы и серии подводных лодок Дата закладки и зав. № Даты спуска на воду Даты вступления в строй Прохождение службы Окончание службы Балтийский судостроительный завод № 189, Ленинград «Д-1» «Декабрист», Д-I 05.03.27 №177 03.11.28 18.11.30 БФ (30–33); СФ (33–40) 13.11.40 затонула в результате аварии в Мотовском заливе при глубоководном погружении «Д-2» «Народоволец», ДI 05.03.27 №178 19.05.29 11.10.31 БФ (31–33), СФ (33–39); БФ, ВОВ (39–?) На вечной стоянке в Санкт-Петербурге у Шкиперской протоки «Д-3» «Красногвардеец», Д-I 05.03.27 №179 12.07.31 14.11.31 БФ (31–33); СФ ВОВ (33–42) 06.42 погибла к северу от м. Хьельнес «Л-1» «Ленинец», Л-II 06.09.29 №195 28.02.31 22.10.33 БФ (33–41), СФВ (39–40). 08.11.41, затонула в Неве при артобстреле В 944 г. поднята, в строй не вводилась.

8. Первоначальная версия следствия: убивали манси!

Перевал Дятлова. Смерть, идущая по следу... 8. Первоначальная версия следствия: убивали манси!

Сейчас же лишь ещё раз подчеркнём, что следствие ошибочно полагало, будто "дятловцы" двигались вплоть до 17 часов и лишь в это время (или позже) осуществили постановку палатки. Следствие считало, что в шестом часу вечера группа стала готовиться ко сну: находившиеся внутри палатки туристы начали стаскивать с ног лыжные ботинки и валенки, снимать ватники (найденные впоследствии поверх рюкзаков, но под одеялами), кто-то быстро написал "Вечерник Отортен", а кто-то принялся нарезать корейку... А вот дальше произошло нечто, что вынудило туристов бежать вниз по склону раздетыми и разутыми, рискуя замёрзнуть в ночном лесу. Поступили они так лишь потому, что наверху, на склоне, их ожидала верная смерть. Другими словами, бегство давало шанс на спасение, а вот пребывание возле палатки гарантировало гибель. Что же могло быть этим самым "нечто", способным побудить девятерых взрослых мужчин и девушек искромсать в лохмотья крышу своего единственного убежища и бежать прочь, в морозную тьму? Возможность схода лавины отвергли все опытные туристы, побывавшие на склоне Холат-Сяхыл в феврале-марте 1959 г. (в т.ч. и московские мастера спорта). Да и следов таковой не было тогда замечено. Никаких стихийных бедствий, типа, землетрясения, в этом районе не отмечалось. Так что возможных кандидатов на роль пугающего "нечто" следователь Иванов имел немного - таковыми могли стать бежавшие из мест заключения уголовники и обитатели местных лесов, охотники-манси, в силу неких причин недружественно настроенные к городским жителям. Проверка показала, что с объектов Ивдельской ИТК побегов в январе 1959 г.

323 - 30 BC

From 323 to 30 BC

Hellenistic period: from the death of Alexander the Great in 323 BC to the Roman conquest of Ptolemaic Egypt in 30 BC.

The translator to the reader (of 1684)

The pirates of Panama or The buccaneers of America : The translator to the reader (of 1684)

THE present Volume, both for its Curiosity and Ingenuity, I dare recommend unto the perusal of our English nation, whose glorious actions it containeth. What relateth unto the curiosity hereof, this Piece, both of Natural and Humane History, was no sooner published in the Dutch Original, than it was snatch't up for the most curious Library's of Holland; it was Translated into Spanish (two impressions thereof being sent into Spain in one year); it was taken notice of by the learned Academy of Paris; and finally recommended as worthy our esteem, by the ingenious Author of the Weekly Memorials for the Ingenious, printed here at London about two years ago. Neither all this undeservedly, seeing it enlargeth our acquaintance of Natural History, so much prized and enquir'd for, by the Learned of this present Age, with several observations not easily to be found in other accounts already received from America: and besides, it informeth us (with huge novelty) of as great and bold attempts, in point of Military conduct and valour, as ever were performed by mankind; without excepting, here, either Alexander the Great, or Julius Cæsar, or the rest of the Nine Worthy's of Fame. Of all which actions, as we cannot confess ourselves to have been ignorant hitherto (the very name of Bucaniers being, as yet, known but unto few of the Ingenious; as their Lives, Laws, and Conversation, are in a manner unto none) so can they not choose but be admired, out of this ingenuous Author, by whosoever is curious to learn the various revolutions of humane affairs. But, more especially by our English Nation; as unto whom these things more narrowly do appertain.

X. Пустые дни

Побег из ГУЛАГа. Часть 1. X. Пустые дни

He знаю, как рассказать о мучительно пустых днях, потянувшихся после ареста мужа. Арест в то время был почти смертельным приговором. Каждый день мог быть и моим последним днем на воле. Несколько проще казалось умереть, а надо было жить, чтобы не оборвать две другие жизни: одну большую, там, в тюрьме, другую маленькую, беспомощно и удивленно смотревшую, как исчезали кругом милые, родные лица. Газеты были полны сообщений, как в дни войны. Сначала жуткая инсценировка «процесса Промпартии», когда Рамзин, бросив фразу, что с его организацией связано около 2000 человек, открыто признал, за сколько жизней он купил свою. Потом угодливая подготовка «академического дела», то есть разгром русской, главным образом исторической, науки, когда судьба ученых была решена в застенках ГПУ. И, наконец, мерзейший «процесс меньшевиков», когда недавние партийцы клялись и кланялись, выдавая сами себя и друг друга. Все это усиливало только чувство бездонной пустоты, в которой тонула все русская интеллигенция. Чем больше смертей, чем больше каторжных приговоров, тем равнодушней становились все кругом. Гибли уже не отдельные люди, погибал весь класс. Террор разрастался в общую катастрофу, поглощавшую личности, сметавшую все на своем пути, как стихийное бедствие. До сих пор, в течение всех революционных лет, для интеллигенции смысл жизни был в работе, чем больше дезорганизации вносила революция, тем напряженней становился труд, чтобы, несмотря на отчаянную, гибельную политику, спасти что только можно в несчастной стране. Теперь все это становилось непосильным. Ответом на 13 лет упорного труда в самых тяжких условиях был слепой, безжалостный террор.

800 - 323 BC

From 800 to 323 BC

From the end of Greek Dark Ages c. 800 BC to the death of Alexander the Great in 323 BC.

XXIII. Домой

Побег из ГУЛАГа. Часть 1. XXIII. Домой

На улицах было жарко, пыльно и душно. Окна кооперативов стояли совершенно пустые. На тележках продавали какую-то вялую зелень. Все шли усталые, скучные. В трамвае ссорились и переругивались. А все-таки, если бы установить всеобщую повинность и пересажать всех обывателей в ГПУ, они бы поняли, что нельзя так спокойно ходить по Шпалерке, считая, что это их не касается, пока их самих туда не засадили. Они поняли бы цену жизни и воли, чтобы вовремя ее защитить, а не таскали по улицам свою серую скуку, свою жалкую жизнь, опустошенную нуждой и страхом, пока их не засадят в застенок. Дома я нашла то, что ожидала: чужие люди, беспорядок, распроданные вещи. Дома, очага не существовало более, но сквозь горечь и боль утрат прорвался и вернул к жизни один крик: — Мама!.. Крик, полный восторга, изумления, любви, невысказанного горя, всего, что накопилось в его одиноком крохотном сердце. — Мама, мама, мама! — говорил он тихо, громко, ласково, жалобно, на все голоса, не находя больше слов. — Почему ты такой худой и бледный? — спросила я, ощупывая его повсюду. Как было замечательно, что я могла его трогать и гладить, моего брошенного мальчика. — Ты болел? — Нет, только один раз, немножко. У меня была крапивная лихорадка. Но я отнес твою передачу в тот день, чтобы ты не волновалась. Доктор сказал, что можно.