Chapter XVI


Captain Morgan takes the Castle of Chagre, with four hundred men sent to this purpose from St. Catherine's.


CAPTAIN MORGAN sending this little fleet to Chagre, chose for vice-admiral thereof one Captain Brodely, who had been long in those quarters, and committed many robberies on the Spaniards, when Mansvelt took the isle of St. Catherine, as was before related; and therefore was thought a fit person for this exploit, his actions likewise having rendered him famous among the pirates, and their enemies the Spaniards. Captain Brodely being made commander, in three days after his departure arrived in sight of the said castle of Chagre, by the Spaniards called St. Lawrence. This castle is built on a high mountain, at the entry of the river, surrounded by strong palisades, or wooden walls, filled with earth, which secures them as well as the best wall of stone or brick. The top of this mountain is, in a manner, divided into two parts, between which is a ditch thirty feet deep. The castle hath but one entry, and that by a drawbridge over this ditch. To the land it has four bastions, and to the sea two more. The south part is totally inaccessible, through the cragginess of the mountain. The north is surrounded by the river, which here is very broad. At the foot of the castle, or rather mountain, is a strong fort, with eight great guns, commanding the entry of the river. Not much lower are two other batteries, each of six pieces, to defend likewise the mouth of the river. At one side of the castle are two great storehouses of all sorts of warlike ammunition and merchandise, brought thither from the island country. Near these houses is a high pair of stairs hewn out of the rock, to mount to the top of the castle. On the west is a small port, not above seven or eight fathoms deep, fit for small vessels, and of very good anchorage; besides, before the castle, at the entry of the river, is a great rock, scarce to be described but at low tides.

No sooner had the Spaniards perceived the pirates, but they fired incessantly at them with the biggest of their guns. They came to an anchor in a small port, about a league from the castle. Next morning, very early, they went ashore, and marched through the woods, to attack the castle on that side. This march lasted till two of the clock in the afternoon, before they could reach the castle, by reason of the difficulties of the way, and its mire and dirt; and though their guides served them very exactly, yet they came so nigh the castle at first, that they lost many of their men by its shot, they being in an open place without covert. This much perplexed the pirates, not knowing what course to take; for on that side, of necessity, they must make the assault: and being uncovered from head to foot, they could not advance one step without danger: besides that, the castle, both for its situation and strength, made them much doubt of success. But to give it over they dared not, lest they should be reproached by their companions.

At last, after many doubts and disputes, resolving to hazard the assault and their lives desperately, they advanced towards the castle with their swords in one hand, and fire-balls in the other. The Spaniards defended themselves very briskly, ceasing not to fire at them continually; crying withal, "Come on, ye English dogs! enemies to God and our king; and let your other companions that are behind come on too, ye shall not go to Panama this bout." The pirates making some trial to climb the walls, were forced to retreat, resting themselves till night. This being come, they returned to the assault, to try, by the help of their fire-balls, to destroy the pales before the wall; and while they were about it, there happened a very remarkable accident, which occasioned their victory. One of the pirates being wounded with an arrow in his back, which pierced his body through, he pulled it out boldly at the side of his breast, and winding a little cotton about it, he put it into his musket, and shot it back to the castle; but the cotton being kindled by the powder, fired two or three houses in the castle, being thatched with palm-leaves, which the Spaniards perceived not so soon as was necessary; for this fire meeting with a parcel of powder, blew it up, thereby causing great ruin, and no less consternation to the Spaniards, who were not able to put a stop to it, not having seen it time enough.

The pirates perceiving the effect of the arrow, and the misfortunes of the Spaniards, were infinitely glad; and while they were busied in quenching the fire, which caused a great confusion for want of water, the pirates took this opportunity, setting fire likewise to the palisades. The fire thus seen at once in several parts about the castle, gave them great advantage against the Spaniards, many breaches being made by the fire among the pales, great heaps of earth falling into the ditch. Then the pirates climbing up, got over into the castle, though those Spaniards, who were not busy about the fire, cast down many flaming pots full of combustible matter, and odious smells, which destroyed many of the English.

The Spaniards, with all their resistance, could not hinder the palisades from being burnt down before midnight. Meanwhile the pirates continued in their intention of taking the castle; and though the fire was very great, they would creep on the ground, as near as they could, and shoot amidst the flames against the Spaniards on the other side, and thus killed many from the walls. When day was come, they observed all the movable earth, that lay betwixt the pales, to be fallen into the ditch; so that now those within the castle lay equally exposed to them without, as had been on the contrary before; whereupon the pirates continued shooting very furiously, and killed many Spaniards; for the governor had charged them to make good those posts, answering to the heaps of earth fallen into the ditch, and caused the artillery to be transported to the breaches.

The fire within the castle still continuing, the pirates from abroad did what they could to hinder its progress, by shooting incessantly against it; one party of them was employed only for this, while another watched all the motions of the Spaniards. About noon the English gained a breach, which the governor himself defended with twenty-five soldiers. Here was made a very courageous resistance by the Spaniards, with muskets, pikes, stones, and swords; but through all these the pirates fought their way, till they gained the castle. The Spaniards, who remained alive, cast themselves down from the castle into the sea, choosing rather to die thus (few or none surviving the fall) than to ask quarter for their lives. The governor himself retreated to the corps du gard, before which were placed two pieces of cannon: here he still defended himself, not demanding any quarter, till he was killed with a musket-shot in the head.

The governor being dead, and the corps du gard surrendering, they found remaining in it alive thirty men, whereof scarce ten were not wounded: these informed the pirates that eight or nine of their soldiers had deserted, and were gone to Panama, to carry news of their arrival and invasion. These thirty men alone remained of three hundred and fourteen wherewith the castle was garrisoned, among which not one officer was found alive. These were all made prisoners, and compelled to tell whatever they knew of their designs and enterprises. Among other things, that the governor of Panama had notice sent him three weeks ago from Carthagena, that the English were equipping a fleet at Hispaniola, with a design to take Panama; and, beside, that this had been discovered by a deserter from the pirates at the river De la Hacha, where they had victualled. That upon this, the governor had sent one hundred and sixty-four men to strengthen the garrison of that castle, with much provision and ammunition; the ordinary garrison whereof was only one hundred and fifty men, but these made up two hundred and fourteen men, very well armed. Besides this, they declared that the governor of Panama had placed several ambuscades along the river of Chagre; and that he waited for them in the open fields of Panama with three thousand six hundred men.

The taking of this castle cost the pirates excessively dear, in comparison to what they were wont to lose, and their toil and labour was greater than at the conquest of the isle of St. Catherine; for, numbering their men, they had lost above a hundred, beside seventy wounded. They commanded the Spanish prisoners to cast the dead bodies of their own men from the top of the mountain to the seaside, and to bury them. The wounded were carried to the church, of which they made an hospital, and where also they shut up the women.

Captain Morgan remained not long behind at St. Catherine's, after taking the castle of Chagre, of which he had notice presently; but before he departed, he embarked all the provisions that could be found, with much maize, or Indian wheat, and cazave, whereof also is made bread in those ports. He transported great store of provisions to the garrison of Chagre, whencesoever they could be got. At a certain place they cast into the sea all the guns belonging thereto, designing to return, and leave that island well garrisoned, to the perpetual possession of the pirates; but he ordered all the houses and forts to be fired, except the castle of St. Teresa, which he judged to be the strongest and securest wherein to fortify himself at his return from Panama.

Having completed his arrangements, he took with him all the prisoners of the island, and then sailed for Chagre, where he arrived in eight days. Here the joy of the whole fleet was so great, when they spied the English colours on the castle, that they minded not their way into the river, so that they lost four ships at the entry thereof, Captain Morgan's being one; yet they saved all the men and goods. The ships, too, had been preserved, if a strong northerly wind had not risen, which cast them on the rock at the entry of the river.

Captain Morgan was brought into the castle with great acclamations of all the pirates, both of those within, and those newly come. Having heard the manner of the conquest, he commanded all the prisoners to work, and repair what was necessary, especially to set up new palisades round the forts of the castle. There were still in the river some Spanish vessels, called chatten, serving for transportation of merchandise up and down the river, and to go to Puerto Bello and Nicaragua. These commonly carry two great guns of iron, and four small ones of brass. These vessels they seized, with four little ships they found there, and all the canoes. In the castle they left a garrison of five hundred men, and in the ships in the river one hundred and fifty more. This done, Captain Morgan departed for Panama at the head of twelve hundred men. He carried little provisions with him, hoping to provide himself sufficiently among the Spaniards, whom he knew to lie in ambuscade by the way.

30 г. до н.э. - 476 г. н.э

С 30 г. до н.э. по 476 г. н.э

Римская (имперская) и поздняя Античность. С конца последнего эллинистического государства, Птолемейского Египта в 30 г. до н.э. до конца Западной Римской империи в 476 г. н.э.

Глава 22

Сквозь ад русской революции. Воспоминания гардемарина. 1914–1919. Глава 22

Шесть месяцев без перерыва я служил на бронепоезде «Адмирал Колчак». В современной войне этот род войск утратил свое значение, поскольку концентрация мощных артиллерийских средств не позволяет бронепоездам действовать на поражающей дистанции. Но в годы Гражданской войны в России артиллерийских орудий имелось сравнительно мало, а линии фронтов были весьма подвижны. В этих условиях бронепоезд, оснащенный батареей из двух полевых орудий и 12 пулеметами, становился грозной силой. Наш бронепоезд не знал передышки. Мы редко оставляли прифронтовую полосу более чем на один день. Во время наступления, когда позволяло состояние железнодорожных путей, мы двигались вместе с пехотой. Во время отступления вели арьергардные бои, прикрывая передвижения своих войск, разрушая за собой железнодорожные мосты. Мы взаимодействовали буквально с каждой дивизией Северо-западной армии. Где бы ни происходили бои, нам приказывали являться в штабы дивизий для получения заданий. Минимум раз в неделю нам приходилось делать стоянку на своей базе, чтобы пополнить запас боеприпасов. Широкий диапазон действий позволял нам иметь достаточно достоверную картину ситуации. В качестве корректировщика артиллерийского огня я посещал расположение разных боевых частей и общался с огромным количеством людей. Как и в любой другой, в Белой армии не было двух абсолютно одинаковых людей, но офицеров этой армии можно было условно разделить на четыре категории.

Chapter XV

The voyage of the Beagle. Chapter XV. Passage of the Cordillera

Valparaiso Portillo Pass Sagacity of Mules Mountain-torrents Mines, how discovered Proofs of the gradual Elevation of the Cordillera Effect of Snow on Rocks Geological Structure of the two main Ranges, their distinct Origin and Upheaval Great Subsidence Red Snow Winds Pinnacles of Snow Dry and clear Atmosphere Electricity Pampas Zoology of the opposite Side of the Andes Locusts Great Bugs Mendoza Uspallata Pass Silicified Trees buried as they grew Incas Bridge Badness of the Passes exaggerated Cumbre Casuchas Valparaiso MARCH 7th, 1835.—We stayed three days at Concepcion, and then sailed for Valparaiso. The wind being northerly, we only reached the mouth of the harbour of Concepcion before it was dark. Being very near the land, and a fog coming on, the anchor was dropped. Presently a large American whaler appeared alongside of us; and we heard the Yankee swearing at his men to keep quiet, whilst he listened for the breakers. Captain Fitz Roy hailed him, in a loud clear voice, to anchor where he then was. The poor man must have thought the voice came from the shore: such a Babel of cries issued at once from the ship—every one hallooing out, "Let go the anchor! veer cable! shorten sail!" It was the most laughable thing I ever heard. If the ship's crew had been all captains, and no men, there could not have been a greater uproar of orders.

Глава 11

Сквозь ад русской революции. Воспоминания гардемарина. 1914–1919. Глава 11

Возвратившись в город после двухмесячного отсутствия, я смотрел на Петроград глазами постороннего. Впечатление было безрадостным и мрачным. В морозные мартовские дни Петроград выглядел шумным, необузданным, румяным парнем, полным сил и эгоистических надежд. Знойным, душным августом Петроград казался истасканным, преждевременно состарившимся человеком неопределенного возраста, с мешками под глазами и душой, из которой подозрения и страхи выхолостили отвагу и решимость. Чужими выглядели неопрятные здания, грязные тротуары, лица людей на улицах. Обескураживало больше всего то, что происходившее в Петрограде выражало состояние всей страны. В последние годы старого режима Россия начала скольжение по наклонной плоскости. Мартовская революция высвободила силы, повлекшие страну дальше вниз. Она вступила в последнюю стадию падения. Заключительный этап распада пришелся на период между маем и октябрем 1917 года. В это время главным актером на политической сцене был Керенский. Как государственный деятель и лидер страны он был слишком ничтожен, чтобы влиять на ход событий. Сложившимся за рубежом мнением о значимости своей персоны он обязан рекламе. Представители союзнических правительств и пресса связывали с ним последнюю надежду на спасение России. Чтобы подбодрить себя, они представляли Керенского сильным, энергичным, умным патриотом, способным повернуть вспять неблагоприятное течение событий и превратить Россию в надежного военного союзника. Однако образованные люди России не обманывались. В начале марта рассказывали о первом дне пребывания Керенского на посту министра юстиции.

17. Аресты в Москве

Записки «вредителя». Часть I. Время террора. 17. Аресты в Москве

Во всем чувствовалась подготовка к каким-то событиям. Коммунисты и спецы, близкие к коммунистам, занимавшие видные посты в рыбной промышленности, бежали из Москвы. Еще весной В. И. Мейснер, бывший начальник «Главрыбы», человек, близкий к большевикам, больше коммунист, чем сами коммунисты, «по собственному желанию» оставил место директора Научного института рыбного хозяйства в Москве и уехал в экспедицию на Каспийское море. Член правления «Союзрыбы», коммунист М. Непряхин, неожиданно ушел из «Союзрыбы». Крышев, коммунист, бывший старшим директором рыбной промышленности с самого начала революции, также уехал из Москвы. Заместитель директора Института рыбного хозяйства, так называемый «Костя» Сметанин, спешно устроил себе командировку за границу. Что-то чуяли эти люди или, вернее, что-то знали о готовящейся гибели их товарищей, и чья-то заботливая рука отводила их от места, предназначенного к обстрелу. Перед уходом Крышев успел напечатать в «Известиях» 2 августа 1930 года интервью, явно предназначенное для ГПУ, в котором, не называя, но достаточно прозрачно намекая, доносил на М. А. Казакова, обвиняя его в потворстве частновладельческому промыслу и в том, что, проводя охранительные мероприятия по лову рыбы, он злостно препятствовал развитию рыбной промышленности. Крышев знал, что в советских условиях ответить на такую клевету невозможно и что она может быть очень опасной. Действительно, обе эти вины были представлены ГПУ как факты «вредительства», и М. А. Казаков был расстрелян.

17. Рейтинг безумия. Версии гибели группы Дятлова на любые вкус и цвет

Перевал Дятлова. Смерть, идущая по следу... 17. Рейтинг безумия. Версии гибели группы Дятлова на любые вкус и цвет

Поскольку таковых версий существует великое множество, имеет смысл их каким-то образом классифицировать. Оптимальной представляется классификация, принятая на большинстве тематических форумов и сайтах, так что не станем изобретать велосипед и воспользуемся ею в качестве образца. Итак, всё многообразие версий можно свести к трём большим несхожим группам, объясняющим гибель группы воздействием факторов следующего характера: - естественно-природного; - паранормального; - криминального. Е с т е с т в е н н о - п р и р о д н ы е, как явствует из самого названия, пытаются объяснить трагические события на склоне Холат-Сяхыл природными явлениями и оперируют естественнонаучными фактами и представлениями в пределах компетенции авторов. Наиболее аргументированной из всех версий этой категории представляется предположение Евгения Вадимовича Буянова, петербургского исследователя "дятловской" трагедии, о произошедшем на месте установки палатки сходе лавины. Эту версию Евгений Вадимович обосновал в книге "Тайна аварии Дятлова", написанной в соавторстве с Борисом Ефимовичем Слобцовым, неоднократно упоминавшимся в настоящем очерке участнике поисковой операции. Нельзя не отметить, что книга получилась очень познавательной, даже о весьма скучных сугубо технических и математических материях авторы сумели написать живо и занимательно. Книгу эту можно рекомендовать к прочтению даже с целью простого расширения кругозора - время не будет потрачено зря.

Нижний Палеолит

Нижний Палеолит. Период примерно от 2.6 миллионов до 300 000 лет назад

Нижний Палеолит. Период примерно от 2.6 миллионов до 300 000 лет назад.

Глава 1. Подводники Балтики в Гражданской войне (1917-1920 гг.) [11]

Короли подплава в море червонных валетов. Часть I. Советский подплав в период Гражданской войны (1918–1920 гг.). Глава 1. Подводники Балтики в Гражданской войне (1917-1920 гг.)

Гражданская война в России началась не сразу. Ее начало и развитие обусловил целый ряд событий. 25 октября{1} 1917 г. в Петрограде был совершен вооруженный захват власти (переворот). Верховная власть перешла к радикальному крылу российских социал-демократов — большевикам. Наступила эра беззакония, свойственного революционным периодам любого толка. В стране появились первые признаки гражданской войны в условиях вялотекущей мировой войны. Характеризуя общую обстановку в стране и во флоте в частности, командующий под брейд-вымпелом дивизией подводных лодок Балтийского моря капитан 2 ранга В. Ф. Дудкин докладывал в своем рапорте от 19 ноября 1917 г. командующему Балтийским флотом контр-адмиралу А. В. Развозову: «Несомненно, что Россия идет сейчас быстрыми шагами к окончанию войны и мир с Германией будет заключен не дальше весны, ибо вся страна фактически воевать больше не может и никакие речи видных политических деятелей не в состоянии изменить твердо сложившегося мировоззрения народа, армии и флота. Цель войны в массах утеряна, у всех погасла надежда на боевой успех и военный дух в стране не существует. Это отражается реально на всей жизни страны. Заводская техника и качество ремонта подлодок падают с каждым днем. [12] Старая опытная команда лодок постепенно уходит на берег, и качество личного состава заметно понижается». «Анализ момента», данный простым русским офицером флота буквально в двух словах, сделал бы честь любому политику того времени, оцени он сложившуюся обстановку подобным образом.

1763 - 1789

From 1763 to 1789

From the end of the Seven Years' War in 1763 to the beginning of the French Revolution in 1789.

476 - 718

From 476 to 718

Initial period of Early Middle Ages. From the end of the Western Roman Empire in 476 to the beginning of Charles Martel's rule in 718.

Воспоминания кавказского офицера : I

Воспоминания кавказского офицера : I

При заключении Адрианопольского трактата, в 1829 году, Порта отказалась в пользу России от всего восточного берега Черного мор и уступила ей черкесские земли, лежащие между Кубанью и морским берегом, вплоть до границы Абхазии, отделившейся от Турции еще лет двадцать тому назад. Эта уступка имела значение на одной бумаге — на деле Россия могла завладеть уступленным ей пространством не иначе как силой. Кавказские племена, которые султан считал своими подданными, никогда ему не повиновались. Они признавали его, как наследника Магомета и падишаха всех мусульман, своим духовным главой, но не платили податей и не ставили солдат. Турок, занимавших несколько крепостей на морском берегу, горцы терпели у себя по праву единоверия, но не допускали их вмешиваться в свои внутренние дела и дрались с ними или, лучше сказать, били их без пощады при всяком подобном вмешательстве. Уступка, сделанная султаном, горцам казалась совершенно непонятною. Не углубляясь в исследование политических начал, на которых султан основывал свои права, горцы говорили: "Мы и наши предки были совершенно независимы, никогда не принадлежали султану, потому что его не слушали и ничего ему не платили, и никому другому не хотим принадлежать. Султан нами не владел и поэтому не мог нас уступить". Десять лет спустя, когда черкесы уже имели случай коротко познакомиться с русской силой, они все-таки не изменили своих понятий.

Карта сайта

Карта сайта Proistoria.org