Chapter XVI


Captain Morgan takes the Castle of Chagre, with four hundred men sent to this purpose from St. Catherine's.


CAPTAIN MORGAN sending this little fleet to Chagre, chose for vice-admiral thereof one Captain Brodely, who had been long in those quarters, and committed many robberies on the Spaniards, when Mansvelt took the isle of St. Catherine, as was before related; and therefore was thought a fit person for this exploit, his actions likewise having rendered him famous among the pirates, and their enemies the Spaniards. Captain Brodely being made commander, in three days after his departure arrived in sight of the said castle of Chagre, by the Spaniards called St. Lawrence. This castle is built on a high mountain, at the entry of the river, surrounded by strong palisades, or wooden walls, filled with earth, which secures them as well as the best wall of stone or brick. The top of this mountain is, in a manner, divided into two parts, between which is a ditch thirty feet deep. The castle hath but one entry, and that by a drawbridge over this ditch. To the land it has four bastions, and to the sea two more. The south part is totally inaccessible, through the cragginess of the mountain. The north is surrounded by the river, which here is very broad. At the foot of the castle, or rather mountain, is a strong fort, with eight great guns, commanding the entry of the river. Not much lower are two other batteries, each of six pieces, to defend likewise the mouth of the river. At one side of the castle are two great storehouses of all sorts of warlike ammunition and merchandise, brought thither from the island country. Near these houses is a high pair of stairs hewn out of the rock, to mount to the top of the castle. On the west is a small port, not above seven or eight fathoms deep, fit for small vessels, and of very good anchorage; besides, before the castle, at the entry of the river, is a great rock, scarce to be described but at low tides.

No sooner had the Spaniards perceived the pirates, but they fired incessantly at them with the biggest of their guns. They came to an anchor in a small port, about a league from the castle. Next morning, very early, they went ashore, and marched through the woods, to attack the castle on that side. This march lasted till two of the clock in the afternoon, before they could reach the castle, by reason of the difficulties of the way, and its mire and dirt; and though their guides served them very exactly, yet they came so nigh the castle at first, that they lost many of their men by its shot, they being in an open place without covert. This much perplexed the pirates, not knowing what course to take; for on that side, of necessity, they must make the assault: and being uncovered from head to foot, they could not advance one step without danger: besides that, the castle, both for its situation and strength, made them much doubt of success. But to give it over they dared not, lest they should be reproached by their companions.

At last, after many doubts and disputes, resolving to hazard the assault and their lives desperately, they advanced towards the castle with their swords in one hand, and fire-balls in the other. The Spaniards defended themselves very briskly, ceasing not to fire at them continually; crying withal, "Come on, ye English dogs! enemies to God and our king; and let your other companions that are behind come on too, ye shall not go to Panama this bout." The pirates making some trial to climb the walls, were forced to retreat, resting themselves till night. This being come, they returned to the assault, to try, by the help of their fire-balls, to destroy the pales before the wall; and while they were about it, there happened a very remarkable accident, which occasioned their victory. One of the pirates being wounded with an arrow in his back, which pierced his body through, he pulled it out boldly at the side of his breast, and winding a little cotton about it, he put it into his musket, and shot it back to the castle; but the cotton being kindled by the powder, fired two or three houses in the castle, being thatched with palm-leaves, which the Spaniards perceived not so soon as was necessary; for this fire meeting with a parcel of powder, blew it up, thereby causing great ruin, and no less consternation to the Spaniards, who were not able to put a stop to it, not having seen it time enough.

The pirates perceiving the effect of the arrow, and the misfortunes of the Spaniards, were infinitely glad; and while they were busied in quenching the fire, which caused a great confusion for want of water, the pirates took this opportunity, setting fire likewise to the palisades. The fire thus seen at once in several parts about the castle, gave them great advantage against the Spaniards, many breaches being made by the fire among the pales, great heaps of earth falling into the ditch. Then the pirates climbing up, got over into the castle, though those Spaniards, who were not busy about the fire, cast down many flaming pots full of combustible matter, and odious smells, which destroyed many of the English.

The Spaniards, with all their resistance, could not hinder the palisades from being burnt down before midnight. Meanwhile the pirates continued in their intention of taking the castle; and though the fire was very great, they would creep on the ground, as near as they could, and shoot amidst the flames against the Spaniards on the other side, and thus killed many from the walls. When day was come, they observed all the movable earth, that lay betwixt the pales, to be fallen into the ditch; so that now those within the castle lay equally exposed to them without, as had been on the contrary before; whereupon the pirates continued shooting very furiously, and killed many Spaniards; for the governor had charged them to make good those posts, answering to the heaps of earth fallen into the ditch, and caused the artillery to be transported to the breaches.

The fire within the castle still continuing, the pirates from abroad did what they could to hinder its progress, by shooting incessantly against it; one party of them was employed only for this, while another watched all the motions of the Spaniards. About noon the English gained a breach, which the governor himself defended with twenty-five soldiers. Here was made a very courageous resistance by the Spaniards, with muskets, pikes, stones, and swords; but through all these the pirates fought their way, till they gained the castle. The Spaniards, who remained alive, cast themselves down from the castle into the sea, choosing rather to die thus (few or none surviving the fall) than to ask quarter for their lives. The governor himself retreated to the corps du gard, before which were placed two pieces of cannon: here he still defended himself, not demanding any quarter, till he was killed with a musket-shot in the head.

The governor being dead, and the corps du gard surrendering, they found remaining in it alive thirty men, whereof scarce ten were not wounded: these informed the pirates that eight or nine of their soldiers had deserted, and were gone to Panama, to carry news of their arrival and invasion. These thirty men alone remained of three hundred and fourteen wherewith the castle was garrisoned, among which not one officer was found alive. These were all made prisoners, and compelled to tell whatever they knew of their designs and enterprises. Among other things, that the governor of Panama had notice sent him three weeks ago from Carthagena, that the English were equipping a fleet at Hispaniola, with a design to take Panama; and, beside, that this had been discovered by a deserter from the pirates at the river De la Hacha, where they had victualled. That upon this, the governor had sent one hundred and sixty-four men to strengthen the garrison of that castle, with much provision and ammunition; the ordinary garrison whereof was only one hundred and fifty men, but these made up two hundred and fourteen men, very well armed. Besides this, they declared that the governor of Panama had placed several ambuscades along the river of Chagre; and that he waited for them in the open fields of Panama with three thousand six hundred men.

The taking of this castle cost the pirates excessively dear, in comparison to what they were wont to lose, and their toil and labour was greater than at the conquest of the isle of St. Catherine; for, numbering their men, they had lost above a hundred, beside seventy wounded. They commanded the Spanish prisoners to cast the dead bodies of their own men from the top of the mountain to the seaside, and to bury them. The wounded were carried to the church, of which they made an hospital, and where also they shut up the women.

Captain Morgan remained not long behind at St. Catherine's, after taking the castle of Chagre, of which he had notice presently; but before he departed, he embarked all the provisions that could be found, with much maize, or Indian wheat, and cazave, whereof also is made bread in those ports. He transported great store of provisions to the garrison of Chagre, whencesoever they could be got. At a certain place they cast into the sea all the guns belonging thereto, designing to return, and leave that island well garrisoned, to the perpetual possession of the pirates; but he ordered all the houses and forts to be fired, except the castle of St. Teresa, which he judged to be the strongest and securest wherein to fortify himself at his return from Panama.

Having completed his arrangements, he took with him all the prisoners of the island, and then sailed for Chagre, where he arrived in eight days. Here the joy of the whole fleet was so great, when they spied the English colours on the castle, that they minded not their way into the river, so that they lost four ships at the entry thereof, Captain Morgan's being one; yet they saved all the men and goods. The ships, too, had been preserved, if a strong northerly wind had not risen, which cast them on the rock at the entry of the river.

Captain Morgan was brought into the castle with great acclamations of all the pirates, both of those within, and those newly come. Having heard the manner of the conquest, he commanded all the prisoners to work, and repair what was necessary, especially to set up new palisades round the forts of the castle. There were still in the river some Spanish vessels, called chatten, serving for transportation of merchandise up and down the river, and to go to Puerto Bello and Nicaragua. These commonly carry two great guns of iron, and four small ones of brass. These vessels they seized, with four little ships they found there, and all the canoes. In the castle they left a garrison of five hundred men, and in the ships in the river one hundred and fifty more. This done, Captain Morgan departed for Panama at the head of twelve hundred men. He carried little provisions with him, hoping to provide himself sufficiently among the Spaniards, whom he knew to lie in ambuscade by the way.

11. Система понуждения заключенных к работе

Записки «вредителя». Часть III. Концлагерь. 11. Система понуждения заключенных к работе

Хорошо известно, что принудительный труд непроизводителен. «Срок идет!» — одно из любимых изречений заключенных, которым они выражают свое отношение к подневольному труду. Этим они хотят сказать: как ни работай, хоть лоб разбей на работе, хоть ничего не делай, время движется одинаково и вместе с ним проходит и срок назначенного заключения. У заключенных нет и слова «работать», они заменяют его соловецкими словами: «втыкать» или «ишачить», от слова ишак — осел. Труд по-соловецки — «втык». Что это значит и откуда взялось, никто хорошенько не знает, но самая бессмысленность слова выразительна. Это отношение заключенных к принудительному труду не тайна для ГПУ, и для понуждения их к работе оно разработало сложную систему мероприятий. До 1930 года в лагерях «особого назначения» эти меры были просты: заключенным давали уроки, невыполнивших морили голодом, били, истязали, убивали. Теперь в «трудовых, исправительных» лагерях эти меры более разнообразны. Есть категория мер и прежнего порядка, лагерей «особого назначения», — это меры физического воздействия. На всех работах, где это возможно по их характеру, по-прежнему устанавливаются суточные задания — уроки. Невыполняющим урока сокращают рацион питания. Основа питания — это черный хлеб; на тяжких физических работах выдают по восемьсот граммов в сутки. При невыполнении урока выдачу хлеба снижают, в зависимости от процента невыполнения, до пятисот граммов и даже до трехсот граммов в день.

4. Вечеракша

Записки «вредителя». Часть III. Концлагерь. 4. Вечеракша

Конвойный привел меня в общий пассажирский вагон железнодорожной ветки, соединяющей Попов остров со станцией Кемь, и сел на лавочку рядом со мной, зажав винтовку между колен В вагоне было много пассажиров: рабочих с лесопильного завода, местных крестьян, баб, ребятишек. Никто на меня не обращал внимания, так здесь все привыкли к арестантам-«услоновцам». В Кеми заключенных больше, чем жителей. Но мне казалась странной и моя фигура, переряженная в каторжные отрепья, и мое присутствие среди вольных людей с их обычными житейскими разговорами Особенно поражали меня дети, которых я не видел давно. Хотелось заговорить со славным белобрысым мальчонкой, который сидел против и косился на меня своими лукавыми глазенками, но за такой разговор — «нелегальное сношение с вольными» — мне грозил карцер. В открытое окно я видел болото, мелкий лес. Тоскливые, унылые места, но ни одного человека. Полтора года пробыл я в концлагере и полтора года, начиная с этапа, я всюду думал об одном — о побеге. Во всяком новом положении или месте я прежде всего думал, как это может повлиять на мой план побега, можно ли и как лучше бежать отсюда. И теперь, глядя в окно, я старался представить себе, можно ли бежать с поезда. В конце концов, может быть, если выбрать момент, соскочить на ходу... Конвойный вряд ли решится прыгнуть тоже. Он будет стрелять, но из-за хода поезда, наверное, промажет. Лесок кругом чахлый, но скрыться можно... В это время я заметил, что вдоль железнодорожного пути тянется дорога, и по ней за нашим поездом скачет верховой с ружьем.

2100 г. до н.э. - 1550 г. до н.э.

С 2100 г. до н.э. по 1550 г. до н.э.

Средний Бронзовый век. От образования Среднего царства Древнего Египта в 2100-2000 г.г. до н.э. до начала Нового царства Древнего Египта примерно в 1550 г. до н.э.

Введение

Короли подплава в море червонных валетов. Введение

Если вам когда-либо посчастливится оказаться в Кронштадте, обязательно посетите Якорную площадь, расположенную в центре города. Отдав должное великолепному памятнику русского зодчества — Морскому собору, возвышающемуся над площадью, обратите внимание на расположенный справа от собора памятник выдающемуся российскому флотоводцу адмиралу Степану Осиповичу Макарову. На пьедестале вы прочтете его слова: «Помни войну!» Несмотря на то что некоторые политики продолжают настаивать на исчезновении в современном мире образа врага, никто не станет гарантировать незыблемость мирных отношений между такими разными государствами. Их народы не хотят воевать, но, ведомые безответственными правителями, преследующими свои личные или какие-либо корпоративные цели, достижимые лишь силой, могут оказаться в самом пекле военных действий. Оттого слова адмирала не потеряли своего значения. Заявления о том, что сегодня вооруженные силы нужны только для борьбы с международным терроризмом, — всего лишь лукавство, позволяющее иметь армию и флот в условиях «совершенного отсутствия врага». Поэтому мы с вами возобновим исторический разговор о войне и продолжим знакомство с тем, что произошло с подводными силами Российской империи после ее краха, как Советская Россия стала готовиться к отражению вооруженного посягательства на ее суверенитет и чего она добилась в этом трудном деле. Необычное название книги нуждается в пояснении. «Валетами» в Красном Флоте матросы называли новых красных командиров, [7] наспех прошедших обучение во вновь созданных военно-морских учебных заведениях.

Глава VII

Путешествие натуралиста вокруг света на корабле «Бигль». Глава VII. От Буэнос-Айреса до Санта-Фе

Поездка в Санта-Фе Заросли чертополоха Нравы вискаши Маленькая сова Соленые ручьи Плоские равнины Мастодонт Санта-Фе Перемена ландшафта Геология Зуб вымершей лошади Связь между ископаемыми и современными четвероногими Северной и Южной Америки Последствия великой засухи Парана Повадки ягуара Ножеклюв Зимородок, попугай и ножехвост Революция Буэнос-Айрес Состояние управления 27 сентября. — Вечером я выехал в Санта-Фе, который расположен на берегу Параны, на расстоянии около 300 английских миль от Буэнос-Айреса. Дороги в окрестностях Буэнос-Айреса после дождей были в очень плохом состоянии. Я не мог себе представить, чтобы здесь мог пробраться запряженный волами фургон; и в самом деле, фургоны двигались со скоростью не больше мили в час, а впереди шел человек, высматривавший, где бы лучше проехать. Волы были совершенно измучены; было бы большой ошибкой предполагать, что с улучшением дорог и ускорением передвижения соответственно возрастают и страдания животных. Мы обогнали обоз из фургонов и стадо скота, державшие путь в Мендосу. Расстояние туда составляет около 580 географических миль, а путешествие совершается обыкновенно за 50 дней. Фургоны очень длинные, узкие и крыты тростником; у них только два колеса, диаметр которых в иных случаях доходит до 10 футов. Каждый из фургонов тащат шесть волов, которых подгоняют остроконечной палкой длиной не менее 20 футов, подвешенной под крышей; для коренных волов употребляют палку покороче, а промежуточную пару подгоняют острым выступом, отходящим под прямым углом от середины длинной палки.

Побег из ГУЛАГа

Чернавина Т. Побег из ГУЛАГа

Chapter X

The pirates of Panama or The buccaneers of America : Chapter X

Of the Island of Cuba Captain Morgan attempts to preserve the Isle of St. Catherine as a refuge to the nest of pirates, but fails of his design He arrives at and takes the village of El Puerto del Principe. CAPTAIN MORGAN seeing his predecessor and admiral Mansvelt were dead, used all the means that were possible, to keep in possession the isle of St. Catherine, seated near Cuba. His chief intent was to make it a refuge and sanctuary to the pirates of those parts, putting it in a condition of being a convenient receptacle of their preys and robberies. To this effect he left no stone unmoved, writing to several merchants in Virginia and New England, persuading them to send him provisions and necessaries, towards putting the said island in such a posture of defence, as to fear no danger of invasion from any side. But all this proved ineffectual, by the Spaniards retaking the said island: yet Captain Morgan retained his courage, which put him on new designs. First, he equipped a ship, in order to gather a fleet as great, and as strong as he could. By degrees he effected it, and gave orders to every member of his fleet to meet at a certain port of Cuba, there determining to call a council, and deliberate what was best to be done, and what place first to fall upon. Leaving these preparations in this condition, I shall give my reader some small account of the said isle of Cuba, in whose port this expedition was hatched, seeing I omitted to do it in its proper place. Cuba lies from east to west, in north latitude, from 20 to 23 deg. in length one hundred and fifty German leagues, and about forty in breadth.

10. «Академическое дело»

Записки «вредителя». Часть II. Тюрьма. 10. «Академическое дело»

«Академическое дело» или, как его называли еще, «платоновское дело», по имени академика С. Ф. Платонова, было одним из самых крупных дел ГПУ, наряду с «шахтинским процессом», делом «48-ми», процессом «промпартии» и др. Для жизни русской интеллигенции оно имело огромное значение, значительно большее, чем пышно разыгранный весной 1931 года «процесс меньшевиков», подробно освещенный в советской и заграничной печати. «Академическое дело» известно сравнительно мало, потому что ГПУ не вынесло его на открытый суд и решило судьбу крупнейших ученых в своих застенках. Скудные сведения о нем, проникавшие через лиц, привлеченных по этому «делу», и от близких, передавались каждый раз с такой опаской, были так отрывочны, что даже официальная часть, то есть самое обвинение, осталась в значительной мере неясной и противоречивой. Когда явится возможность представить это дело по документам и свидетельствам людей, непосредственно привлекавшихся по нему, оно займет место истинного некролога русской, особенно исторической, науки. Это будет одна из самых трагичных страниц в повести о русской интеллигенции. Я же могу говорить о нем только как случайный свидетель, со слов лиц, попадавших со мною в те же тюремные камеры, бывших со мною в этапе или в Соловецком концентрационном лагере. Кроме того, я связан тем, что могу передать только ту часть разговоров, по которым ГПУ не сможет установить, от кого я их слышал. Особенностью этого «дела» было прежде всего то, что оно оказалось «неудачным» для ГПУ.

1918 - 1939

From 1918 to 1939

From the end of World War I in 1918 to the beginning of World War II in 1939.

8. Концентрационный лагерь — коммерческое предприятие

Записки «вредителя». Часть III. Концлагерь. 8. Концентрационный лагерь — коммерческое предприятие

По материалам «Рыбпрома» и из разговоров с заключенными, работавшими в других отделениях и центральном управлении лагеря, его сложная структура и физиономия как производственного коммерческого предприятия становилась мне понятной. В 1931 году Соловецкий лагерь достиг максимума своего развития. В его состав входили четырнадцать отделений. Южной границей служили река Свирь и Ладожское озеро, северной — берег Северного Ледовитого океана. На этом протяжении, примерно полторы тысячи километров по линии Мурманской железной дороги, вытянулись, захватив и всю Карелию, производственные предприятия этого лагеря. Лагерь продолжал шириться и стремился выйти из этих пределов. Так как на восток распространению Соловецкого лагеря препятствуют владения другого огромного предприятия ГПУ — Севлона (северных лагерей особого назначения), а на запад — близость финской границы, то лагерь распускал свои щупальца на острова Ледовитого океана, Колгуев и Вайгач, и южный берег Кольского полуострова (Кандалакшский и Терский берега Белого моря). Число заключенных росло с каждым днем. Работы велись огромные и намечались еще большие. Распоряжаясь на территории так называемой Карельской автономной республики как полновластный хозяин, Соловецкий лагерь организовал в огромном масштабе параллельные всем государственным предприятиям Карелии свои коммерческие предприятия. Параллельно карельскому рыбному тресту — «Рыбпром», «Кареллесу» — свои лесозаготовки и свой сплав леса, свое производство кирпича, свое дорожное строительство, свои сельскохозяйственные и животноводческие фермы, совершенно забивая карельскую промышленность.

Судьба катеров после войны

«Шнелльботы». Германские торпедные катера Второй мировой войны. Судьба катеров после войны

Послевоенная жизнь «шнелльботов» была весьма непродолжительной. Их примерно поровну поделили между державами-победительницами. Подавляющее большинство из 32 «шнелльботов», доставшихся Великобритании, было сдано на слом либо затоплено в Северном море в течение двух лет после окончания войны. Расчетливые американцы выставили 26 своих катеров на продажу, и даже сумели извлечь из этого выгоду, «сплавив» их флотам Норвегии и Дании. Полученные СССР по репарациям «шнелльботы» (29 единиц) совсем недолго находились в боевом составе ВМФ - сказалось отсутствие запасных частей, да и сами корпуса были сильно изношены; 12 из них попали в КБФ, где прослужили до февраля 1948 года. Остальные перешли на Север, где 8 катеров были списаны, не пробыв в строю и года. Продлить жизнь остальных до июня 1952 года удалось, использовав механизмы с исключенных «шнелльботов». Экономные датчане дотянули эксплуатацию своих трофеев до 1966 года. Часть катеров они перекупили у Норвегии; всего их в датском флоте насчитывалось 19 единиц. Во флоте ФРГ осталось лишь два «шнелльбота» - бывшие S-116 и S-130. Они использовались в качестве опытовых судов, и к 1965 году были сданы на слом. До наших дней не дожило ни одного немецкого торпедного катера периода Второй мировой войны. Единственными экспонатами, связанными со «шнелльботами», были два дизеля МВ-501, снятые с S-116 и находившиеся в Техническом музее в Мюнхене. Но и они погибли во время пожара в апреле 1983 года.

The translator to the reader (of 1684)

The pirates of Panama or The buccaneers of America : The translator to the reader (of 1684)

THE present Volume, both for its Curiosity and Ingenuity, I dare recommend unto the perusal of our English nation, whose glorious actions it containeth. What relateth unto the curiosity hereof, this Piece, both of Natural and Humane History, was no sooner published in the Dutch Original, than it was snatch't up for the most curious Library's of Holland; it was Translated into Spanish (two impressions thereof being sent into Spain in one year); it was taken notice of by the learned Academy of Paris; and finally recommended as worthy our esteem, by the ingenious Author of the Weekly Memorials for the Ingenious, printed here at London about two years ago. Neither all this undeservedly, seeing it enlargeth our acquaintance of Natural History, so much prized and enquir'd for, by the Learned of this present Age, with several observations not easily to be found in other accounts already received from America: and besides, it informeth us (with huge novelty) of as great and bold attempts, in point of Military conduct and valour, as ever were performed by mankind; without excepting, here, either Alexander the Great, or Julius Cæsar, or the rest of the Nine Worthy's of Fame. Of all which actions, as we cannot confess ourselves to have been ignorant hitherto (the very name of Bucaniers being, as yet, known but unto few of the Ingenious; as their Lives, Laws, and Conversation, are in a manner unto none) so can they not choose but be admired, out of this ingenuous Author, by whosoever is curious to learn the various revolutions of humane affairs. But, more especially by our English Nation; as unto whom these things more narrowly do appertain.