Chapter XI


Captain Morgan resolving to attack and plunder the city of Puerto Bello, equips a fleet, and with little expense and small forces takes it.


SOME may think that the French having deserted Captain Morgan, the English alone could not have sufficient courage to attempt such great actions as before. But Captain Morgan, who always communicated vigour with his words, infused such spirit into his men, as put them instantly upon new designs; they being all persuaded that the sole execution of his orders would be a certain means of obtaining great riches, which so influenced their minds, that with inimitable courage they all resolved to follow him, as did also a certain pirate of Campechy, who on this occasion joined with Captain Morgan, to seek new fortunes under his conduct. Thus Captain Morgan in a few days gathered a fleet of nine sail, either ships or great boats, wherein he had four hundred and sixty military men.

All things being ready, they put forth to sea, Captain Morgan imparting his design to nobody at present; he only told them on several occasions, that he doubted not to make a good fortune by that voyage, if strange occurrences happened not. They steered towards the continent, where they arrived in a few days near Costa Rica, all their fleet safe. No sooner had they discovered land but Captain Morgan declared his intentions to the captains, and presently after to the company. He told them he intended to plunder Puerto Bello by night, being resolved to put the whole city to the sack: and to encourage them he added, this enterprise could not fail, seeing he had kept it secret, without revealing it to anybody, whereby they could not have notice of his coming. To this proposition some answered, "they had not a sufficient number of men to assault so strong and great a city." But Captain Morgan replied, "If our number is small, our hearts are great; and the fewer persons we are, the more union and better shares we shall have in the spoil." Hereupon, being stimulated with the hope of those vast riches they promised themselves from their success, they unanimously agreed to that design. Now, that my reader may better comprehend the boldness of this exploit, it may be necessary to say something beforehand of the city of Puerto Bello.

This city is in the province of Costa Rica, 10 deg. north latitude, fourteen leagues from the gulf of Darien, and eight westwards from the port called Nombre de Dios. It is judged the strongest place the king of Spain possesses in all the West Indies, except Havanna and Carthagena. Here are two castles almost impregnable, that defend the city, situate at the entry of the port, so that no ship or boat can pass without permission. The garrison consists of three hundred soldiers, and the town is inhabited by about four hundred families. The merchants dwell not here, but only reside awhile, when the galleons come from or go for Spain, by reason of the unhealthiness of the air, occasioned by vapours from the mountains; so that though their chief warehouses are at Puerto Bello, their habitations are at Panama, whence they bring the plate upon mules, when the fair begins, and when the ships belonging to the company of negroes arrive to sell slaves.

Captain Morgan, who knew very well all the avenues of this city and the neighbouring coasts, arrived in the dusk of the evening at Puerto de Naos, ten leagues to the west of Puerto Bello. Being come hither, they sailed up the river to another harbour called Puerto Pontin, where they anchored: here they put themselves into boats and canoes, leaving in the ships only a few men to bring them next day to the port. About midnight they came to a place called Estera longa Lemos, where they all went on shore, and marched by land to the first posts of the city: they had in their company an Englishman, formerly a prisoner in those parts, who now served them for a guide: to him and three or four more they gave commission to take the sentinel, if possible, or kill him on the place: but they seized him so cunningly, as he had no time to give warning with his musket, or make any noise, and brought him, with his hands bound, to Captain Morgan, who asked him how things went in the city, and what forces they had; with other circumstances he desired to know. After every question they made him a thousand menaces to kill him, if he declared not the truth. Then they advanced to the city, carrying the said sentinel bound before them: having marched about a quarter of a league, they came to the castle near the city, which presently they closely surrounded, so that no person could get either in or out.

Being posted under the walls of the castle, Captain Morgan commanded the sentinel, whom they had taken prisoner, to speak to those within, charging them to surrender to his discretion; otherwise they should all be cut in pieces, without quarter. But they regarding none of these threats, began instantly to fire, which alarmed the city; yet notwithstanding, though the governor and soldiers of the said castle made as great resistance as could be, they were forced to surrender. Having taken the castle, they resolved to be as good as their words, putting the Spaniards to the sword, thereby to strike a terror into the rest of the city. Whereupon, having shut up all the soldiers and officers as prisoners into one room, they set fire to the powder (whereof they found great quantity) and blew up the castle into the air, with all the Spaniards that were within. This done, they pursued the course of their victory, falling upon the city, which, as yet, was not ready to receive them. Many of the inhabitants cast their precious jewels and money into wells and cisterns, or hid them in places underground, to avoid, as much as possible, being totally robbed. One of the party of pirates, assigned to this purpose, ran immediately to the cloisters, and took as many religious men and women as they could find. The governor of the city, not being able to rally the citizens, through their great confusion, retired to one of the castles remaining, and thence fired incessantly at the pirates: but these were not in the least negligent either to assault him, or defend themselves, so that amidst the horror of the assault, they made very few shots in vain; for aiming with great dexterity at the mouths of the guns, the Spaniards were certain to lose one or two men every time they charged each gun anew.

This continued very furious from break of day till noon; yea, about this time of the day the case was very dubious which party should conquer, or be conquered. At last, the pirates perceiving they had lost many men, and yet advanced but little towards gaining either this, or the other castles, made use of fire-balls, which they threw with their hands, designing to burn the doors of the castles; but the Spaniards from the walls let fall great quantities of stones, and earthen pots full of powder, and other combustible matter, which forced them to desist. Captain Morgan seeing this generous defence made by the Spaniards, began to despair of success. Hereupon, many faint and calm meditations came into his mind; neither could he determine which way to turn himself in that strait. Being thus puzzled, he was suddenly animated to continue the assault, by seeing English colours put forth at one of the lesser castles, then entered by his men; of whom he presently after spied a troop coming to meet him, proclaiming victory with loud shouts of joy. This instantly put him on new resolutions of taking the rest of the castles, especially seeing the chiefest citizens were fled to them, and had conveyed thither great part of their riches, with all the plate belonging to the churches and divine service.

To this effect, he ordered ten or twelve ladders to be made in all haste, so broad, that three or four men at once might ascend them: these being finished, he commanded all the religious men and women, whom he had taken prisoners, to fix them against the walls of the castle. This he had before threatened the governor to do, if he delivered not the castle: but his answer was, "he would never surrender himself alive." Captain Morgan was persuaded the governor would not employ his utmost force, seeing the religious women, and ecclesiastical persons, exposed in the front of the soldiers to the greatest danger. Thus the ladders, as I have said, were put into the hands of religious persons of both sexes, and these were forced, at the head of the companies, to raise and apply them to the walls: but Captain Morgan was fully deceived in his judgment of this design; for the governor, who acted like a brave soldier in performance of his duty, used his utmost endeavour to destroy whosoever came near the walls. The religious men and women ceased not to cry to him, and beg of him, by all the saints of heaven, to deliver the castle, and spare both his and their own lives; but nothing could prevail with his obstinacy and fierceness. Thus many of the religious men and nuns were killed before they could fix the ladders; which at last being done, though with great loss of the said religious people, the pirates mounted them in great numbers, and with not less valour, having fire-balls in their hands, and earthen pots full of powder; all which things, being now at the top of the walls, they kindled and cast in among the Spaniards.

This effort of the pirates was very great, insomuch that the Spaniards could no longer resist nor defend the castle, which was now entered. Hereupon they all threw down their arms, and craved quarter for their lives; only the governor of the city would crave no mercy, but killed many of the pirates with his own hands, and not a few of his own soldiers; because they did not stand to their arms. And though the pirates asked him if he would have quarter; yet he constantly answered, "By no means, I had rather die as a valiant soldier, than be hanged as a coward." They endeavoured as much as they could to take him prisoner, but he defended himself so obstinately, that they were forced to kill him, notwithstanding all the cries and tears of his own wife and daughter, who begged him, on their knees, to demand quarter, and save his life. When the pirates had possessed themselves of the castle, which was about night, they enclosed therein all the prisoners, placing the women and men by themselves, with some guards: the wounded were put in an apartment by itself, that their own complaints might be the cure of their diseases; for no other was afforded them.

This done, they fell to eating and drinking, as usual; that is, committing in both all manner of debauchery and excess, so that fifty courageous men might easily have retaken the city, and killed all the pirates. Next day, having plundered all they could find, they examined some of the prisoners (who had been persuaded by their companions to say they were the richest of the town), charging them severely to discover where they had hid their riches and goods. Not being able to extort anything from them, they not being the right persons, it was resolved to torture them: this they did so cruelly, that many of them died on the rack, or presently after. Now the president of Panama being advertised of the pillage and ruin of Puerto Bello, he employed all his care and industry to raise forces to pursue and cast out the pirates thence; but these cared little for his preparations, having their ships at hand, and determining to fire the city, and retreat. They had now been at Puerto Bello fifteen days, in which time they had lost many of their men, both by the unhealthiness of the country, and their extravagant debaucheries.

Hereupon, they prepared to depart, carrying on board all the pillage they had got, having first provided the fleet with sufficient victuals for the voyage. While these things were doing, Captain Morgan demanded of the prisoners a ransom for the city, or else he would burn it down, and blow up all the castles; withal, he commanded them to send speedily two persons, to procure the sum, which was 100,000 pieces of eight. To this effect two men were sent to the president of Panama, who gave him an account of all. The president, having now a body of men ready, set forth towards Puerto Bello, to encounter the pirates before their retreat; but, they, hearing of his coming, instead of flying away, went out to meet him at a narrow passage, which he must pass: here they placed a hundred men, very well armed, which at the first encounter put to flight a good party of those of Panama. This obliged the president to retire for that time, not being yet in a posture of strength to proceed farther. Presently after, he sent a message to Captain Morgan, to tell him, "that if he departed not suddenly with all his forces from Puerto Bello, he ought to expect no quarter for himself, nor his companions, when he should take them, as he hoped soon to do." Captain Morgan, who feared not his threats, knowing he had a secure retreat in his ships, which were at hand, answered, "he would not deliver the castles, before he had received the contribution money he had demanded; which if it were not paid down, he would certainly burn the whole city, and then leave it, demolishing beforehand the castles, and killing the prisoners."

The governor of Panama perceived by this answer that no means would serve to mollify the hearts of the pirates, nor reduce them to reason: hereupon, he determined to leave them, as also those of the city whom he came to relieve, involved in the difficulties of making the best agreement they could. Thus in a few days more the miserable citizens gathered the contributions required, and brought 100,000 pieces of eight to the pirates for a ransom of their cruel captivity: but the president of Panama was much amazed to consider that four hundred men could take such a great city, with so many strong castles, especially having no ordnance, wherewith to raise batteries, and, what was more, knowing the citizens of Puerto Bello had always great repute of being good soldiers themselves, and who never wanted courage in their own defence. This astonishment was so great, as made him send to Captain Morgan, desiring some small pattern of those arms wherewith he had taken with much vigour so great a city. Captain Morgan received this messenger very kindly, and with great civility; and gave him a pistol, and a few small bullets, to carry back to the president his master; telling him, withal, "he desired him to accept that slender pattern of the arms wherewith he had taken Puerto Bello, and keep them for a twelvemonth; after which time he promised to come to Panama, and fetch them away." The governor returned the present very soon to Captain Morgan, giving him thanks for the favour of lending him such weapons as he needed not; and, withal, sent him a ring of gold, with this message, "that he desired him not to give himself the labour of coming to Panama, as he had done to Puerto Bello: for he did assure him, he should not speed so well here, as he had done there."

After this, Captain Morgan (having provided his fleet with all necessaries, and taken with him the best guns of the castles, nailing up the rest) set sail from Puerto Bello with all his ships, and arriving in a few days at Cuba, he sought out a place wherein he might quickly make the dividend of their spoil. They found in ready money 250,000 pieces of eight, besides other merchandises; as cloth, linen, silks, &c. With this rich purchase they sailed thence to their common place of rendezvous, Jamaica. Being arrived, they passed here some time in all sorts of vices and debaucheries, according to their custom; spending very prodigally what others had gained with no small labour and toil.

2. Начало поисковой операции. Общая хронология розысков. Обнаружение первых тел погибших туристов

Перевал Дятлова. Смерть, идущая по следу... 2. Начало поисковой операции. Общая хронология розысков. Обнаружение первых тел погибших туристов

20 февраля 1959 г. туристическая секция УПИ провела экстренное собрание на повестке которого стоял один вопрос: "ЧП с группой Дятлова!" Открыли собрание зав. кафедрой физического воспитания "Политеха" А.М.Вишневский и председатель студенческого профсоюзного комитета В.Е. Слободин. Они официально сообщили, что задержка группы Игоря Дятлова несанкционированна и рождает беспокойство относительно судьбы её участников. Решение собрания было единогласным: срочно организовать поисково-спасательную операцию и cформировать группы добровольцев из числа студентов института, готовых принять в ней участие. Также было решено обратиться за помощью к туристическим секциям других ВУЗов и учреждений Свердловска. В тот же день профком выделил деньги, необходимые для закупки продуктов и всего необходимого группам, готовящимся к выдвижению в район поисков. Заработала круглосуточная телефонная линия, призванная координировать всю деятельность участников в рамках разворачиваемой операции. Отдельным пунктом проходило решение о создании при студенческом профкоме штаба спасательных работ. На следующий день, 21 февраля, в район поисков стали выдвигаться туристические группы Юрия Блинова и Сергея Согрина, только что возвратившиеся в Свердловск из плановых походов. Третья группа туристов под руководством Владислава Карелина, по стечению обстоятельств уже находившаяся на Северном Урале, также заявила о готовности действовать в интересах спасательной операции. В тот же день спецрейсом на самолёте Ан-2 из Свердловска в Ивдель вылетели председатель спортклуба УПИ Лев Гордо и упомянутый выше член бюро туристической секции Юрий Блинов.

1789 - 1815

From 1789 to 1815

The French Revolution, Directory, Consulate and Napoleon epoch from 1789 to 1815.

Новое время

Новое время : период с 1492 по 1918 год

Новое время : период с 1492 по 1918 год.

II. Новая страда

Побег из ГУЛАГа. Часть 1. II. Новая страда

Пришла зима. Голод становился все злее. Недоедание и сама недоступность еды создавали своеобразное сочетание слабости и равнодушия. Трудно было сказать, обедали мы или нет, потому что сыты мы никогда не были. Обед, который приходилось брать из «общественной столовой», состоял из жидкого супа — вода с пшенной крупой, который назывался «пша», и редко куска ржавой селедки или воблы. Если б это было возможно, я, кажется, совсем перестала бы есть, настолько это было отвратительно. Весной у нас в училище не было выпуска: оба старших класса ушли по набору в Красную Армию. Я осталась почти без работы, потому что маленьких учить никогда не умела. С осени же предполагалась такая перестройка школ, с которой трудно было согласиться и которая до сих пор не нашла сколько-нибудь устойчивой формы. В этот момент усталости и огорчений, потому что за девять лет педагогической работы я была искренне ею увлечена, мы переехали на лето в Павловск. Там было отделение Агрономического института, снабжавшего нашего мальчишку молоком, которое и летом надо было отрабатывать. Павловск — это необыкновенное место. Ведь Петербург окружен запущенными, болотистыми, убогими огородами и полосами ярко-желтой сорной сурепки. Как оазисы, разбросаны среди них великолепные, искусственно созданные парки царских резиденций.

XVI. Агония

Побег из ГУЛАГа. Часть 3. XVI. Агония

Муж ничего не поймал в реке, но отдохнул, и мы решили двинуться дальше. Это была ужасная ошибка. Надо было еще раз все обследовать и обдумать, а мы легкомысленно поверили в то, что за шалашом пойдет чуть ли не колесная дорога. Признаки сразу были скверные: тропа стала суживаться, теряться в береговых зарослях ольхи, опять появляться и снова исчезать в болоте, которое каждый обходил по-своему. Мыкались мы зря и заночевали буквально на островке, посреди не виданных еще по величине болот. Перед нами на запад расстилалось изумрудное море трясины, к которому никак нельзя было подступиться. Оно оттерло нас от реки и продолжало уводить к югу. Очень хотелось вернуться к шалашу: не верилось, что тот чудный лес, с набитыми дорожками, был случайностью. Где-то мы сделали ошибку. Возможно, что мы вернулись бы, но нас обманули лошадиные следы, которые во множестве появились на возобновленной тропинке. Следы были свежие, лошадь кованая, казалось, что только что проехал лесничий. Но, в конце концов, тропа привела нас к новому болоту и канула, как в воду. Мы не подозревали, что финны пускают лошадей, как оленей, пастись в леса, что это они, бродя как попало, а иногда и следуя случайной тропой, создавали нам ложную уверенность в том, что здесь кто-то ездил верхом. Только когда склон отвернулся к юго-востоку, и путь наш оказался совершенно абсурдным, нам ничего другого не оставалось, как искать кратчайшего пути назад. Но непрерывные болота так сбили ноги мне и сыну, что теперь мы едва шли, а заночевать пришлось далеко от шалаша. Муж выбрал для ночлега просеку, и всю ночь жег фантастический костер из целых деревьев, оставшихся не вывезенными.

1871 - 1914

From 1871 to 1914

From the end of the Franco-Prussian War in 1871 to the beginning of World War I in 1914.

Глава 13

Борьба за Красный Петроград. Глава 13

Наряду с деятельностью районных штабов внутренней обороны представляется в высшей степени желательным просмотреть соответствующую подготовку к обороне со стороны наиболее крупных фабрично-заводских предприятий. В таких предприятиях кипела своя производственная работа, направленная исключительно на то, чтобы оказать посильную поддержку в первую очередь полевым частям Красной армии. Промышленные гиганты Петрограда являлись своего рода революционными очагами, где ковалось оружие для фронта и где в процессе производства, не знавшего часов отдыха, вырабатывалась коллективная воля к победе над врагом. В связи с этим работа крупных фабрично-заводских предприятий Петрограда носила отнюдь не местный и не районный характер, а имела широкое значение в ходе подготовки всего города к обороне изнутри. Она являлась одним из действенных реальных факторов, способствовавших обороне Петрограда. [444] Сохранившиеся материалы дают возможность остановиться только на работе Путиловского, Ижорского, Сестрорецкого оружейного и Охтинского порохового заводов. На Путиловском заводе после 14 октября была проведена партийная мобилизация, которая дала около 300 чел. по заводу и около 200 чел.

10. Новая версия следствия: Ахтунг! Ахтунг! Огненные шары в небе!

Перевал Дятлова. Смерть, идущая по следу... 10. Новая версия следствия: Ахтунг! Ахтунг! Огненные шары в небе!

А 31 марта произошло весьма примечательное событие - все члены поисковой группы, находившиеся в лагере в долине Лозьвы, увидели НЛО. Валентин Якименко, участник тех событий, в своих воспоминаниях весьма ёмко описал случившееся : "Рано утром было ещё темно. Дневальный Виктор Мещеряков вышел из палатки и увидел движущийся по небу светящийся шар. Разбудил всех. Минут 20 наблюдали движение шара (или диска), пока он не скрылся за склоном горы. Увидели его на юго-востоке от палатки. Двигался он в северном направлении. Явление это взбудоражило всех. Мы были уверены, что гибель дятловцев как-то связана с ним." Об увиденном было сообщено в штаб поисковой операции, находившийся в Ивделе. Появление в деле НЛО придало расследованию неожиданное направление. Кто-то вспомнил, что "огненные шары" наблюдались примерно в этом же районе 17 февраля 1959 г. о чём в газете "Тагильский рабочий" была даже публикация. И следствие, решительно отбросив версию о "злонамеренных манси-убийцах", принялось работать в новом направлении. Не совсем понятно, какую связь хотели обнаружить работники прокуратуры между светящимся объектом в небе и туристами на земле, но факт остаётся фактом - в первой половине апреля 1959 г. Темпалов отыскал и добросовестно допросил ряд военнослужащих внутренних войск, наблюдавших полёт светящихся небесных объектов около 06:40 17 февраля 1959 г. Все они находились тогда в карауле и дали непротиворечивые описания наблюдавшегося явления. По словам военнослужащих, полёт таинственного объекта был хорошо виден на протяжении от восьми (минимальцая оценка) до пятнадцати (максимальная) минут.

Chapter IX

The voyage of the Beagle. Chapter IX. Santa Cruz, Patagonia, and The Falkland Islands

Santa Cruz Expedition up the River Indians Immense Streams of Basaltic Lava Fragments not transported by the River Excavations of the Valley Condor, Habits of Cordillera Erratic Boulders of great size Indian Relics Return to the Ship Falkland Islands Wild Horses, Cattle, Rabbits Wolf-like Fox Fire made of Bones Manner of Hunting Wild Cattle Geology Streams of Stones Scenes of Violence Penguins Geese Eggs of Doris Compound Animals APRIL 13, 1834.—The Beagle anchored within the mouth of the Santa Cruz. This river is situated about sixty miles south of Port St. Julian. During the last voyage Captain Stokes proceeded thirty miles up it, but then, from the want of provisions, was obliged to return. Excepting what was discovered at that time, scarcely anything was known about this large river. Captain Fitz Roy now determined to follow its course as far as time would allow. On the 18th three whale-boats started, carrying three weeks' provisions; and the party consisted of twenty-five souls—a force which would have been sufficient to have defied a host of Indians. With a strong flood-tide and a fine day we made a good run, soon drank some of the fresh water, and were at night nearly above the tidal influence. The river here assumed a size and appearance which, even at the highest point we ultimately reached, was scarcely diminished. It was generally from three to four hundred yards broad, and in the middle about seventeen feet deep.

Глава XIX

Путешествие натуралиста вокруг света на корабле «Бигль». Глава XIX. Австралия

Экскурсия в Батерст Вид лесов. Группа туземцев Постепенное вымирание коренных жителей Зараза, происходящая от общения со здоровыми людьми Голубые горы Вид грандиозных долин, похожих на заливы Их происхождение и образование Батерст, повсеместная вежливость низших классов населения Состояние общества Вандименова Земля Хобарт-Таун Полное изгнание коренных жителей Гора Веллингтон Залив Короля Георга Унылый вид местности Болд-Хед, известковые слепки ветвей деревьев Группа туземцев Прощание с Австралией 12 января 1836 г. — Рано утром мы понеслись под легким ветерком ко входу в бухту Джексон. Мы ожидали увидеть зеленую местность с разбросанными по ней красивыми домами, а вместо этого вытянувшийся по прямой линии желтоватый береговой обрыв вызвал в памяти побережье Патагонии. Только одинокий маяк, выстроенный из белого камня, говорил нам о близости большого, людного города. Мы вошли в гавань, и оказалось, что она красива и просторна, а ее обрывистые берега сложены горизонтально напластовавшимся песчаником. Почти ровная местность покрыта отдельными низкорослыми деревцами, свидетельствующими о лежащем на этой стране проклятии бесплодия. Но с продвижением в глубь страны картина улучшается: по отлогому берегу там и сям разбросаны красивые виллы и хорошенькие коттеджи. Двух- и трехэтажные каменные дома в отдалении и ветряные мельницы на берегу, у самой воды, указывали на близость столицы Австралии. Наконец, мы бросили якорь в Сиднейской бухте. В маленькой бухте стояло множество больших кораблей, а сама она была окружена товарными складами.

1550 - 1200 BC

From 1550 to 1200 BC

Late Bronze Age. From the New Kingdom of Egypt establishment in c. 1550 BC to the Late Bronze Age collapse between 1200 and 1150 BC.

Таблица 6. Двигатели надводного и подводного хода подводных лодок - 2

Короли подплава в море червонных валетов. Приложение. Таблица 6. Двигатели надводного и подводного хода подводных лодок: Двигатели подводного хода

Двигатели подводного хода Тип двигателя Фирма, марка Мощность, л. с. Кол-во двиг. на пл Место установки Примечание ЭД «Сименс-Шуккерт» и «Вольта» 450 2 пл «Барс», «Вепрь», «Волк», «Гепард» АБ 240 эл. — 1600 А; 220 В Общество русских аккумуляторных з-дов «Тюдор» ЭД «Вольта» (Ревель) 450 2 Все пл т. «Барс» кроме «Барс», «Вепрь», «Волк», «Гепард» АБ 240 эл. — 1600 А; 220 В [410] ЭД   500 при 120В 2 пл т. «Морж» АБ 240 эл. — 2155 Ач./ 1600 А; 220 В. Париж, «Мэто» ЭД   160 2 Все пл т. «АГ» АБ 5 гр по 20 эл — 3000 Ач ЭД «Вольта» (Рига) 70 1 пл «Минога» АБ 2 гр по 33 эл — 2200 Ач. Париж, «Мэто» ЭД «Сотэр-Гарлэ» (Франция) 100 1 пл т. «Касатка» АБ 64 эл — 3600 Ач/ 575 А. Париж, «Фюльмен» ЭД   125 на блок 4 в 2 блоках пл «Св.