Chapter XI


Captain Morgan resolving to attack and plunder the city of Puerto Bello, equips a fleet, and with little expense and small forces takes it.


SOME may think that the French having deserted Captain Morgan, the English alone could not have sufficient courage to attempt such great actions as before. But Captain Morgan, who always communicated vigour with his words, infused such spirit into his men, as put them instantly upon new designs; they being all persuaded that the sole execution of his orders would be a certain means of obtaining great riches, which so influenced their minds, that with inimitable courage they all resolved to follow him, as did also a certain pirate of Campechy, who on this occasion joined with Captain Morgan, to seek new fortunes under his conduct. Thus Captain Morgan in a few days gathered a fleet of nine sail, either ships or great boats, wherein he had four hundred and sixty military men.

All things being ready, they put forth to sea, Captain Morgan imparting his design to nobody at present; he only told them on several occasions, that he doubted not to make a good fortune by that voyage, if strange occurrences happened not. They steered towards the continent, where they arrived in a few days near Costa Rica, all their fleet safe. No sooner had they discovered land but Captain Morgan declared his intentions to the captains, and presently after to the company. He told them he intended to plunder Puerto Bello by night, being resolved to put the whole city to the sack: and to encourage them he added, this enterprise could not fail, seeing he had kept it secret, without revealing it to anybody, whereby they could not have notice of his coming. To this proposition some answered, "they had not a sufficient number of men to assault so strong and great a city." But Captain Morgan replied, "If our number is small, our hearts are great; and the fewer persons we are, the more union and better shares we shall have in the spoil." Hereupon, being stimulated with the hope of those vast riches they promised themselves from their success, they unanimously agreed to that design. Now, that my reader may better comprehend the boldness of this exploit, it may be necessary to say something beforehand of the city of Puerto Bello.

This city is in the province of Costa Rica, 10 deg. north latitude, fourteen leagues from the gulf of Darien, and eight westwards from the port called Nombre de Dios. It is judged the strongest place the king of Spain possesses in all the West Indies, except Havanna and Carthagena. Here are two castles almost impregnable, that defend the city, situate at the entry of the port, so that no ship or boat can pass without permission. The garrison consists of three hundred soldiers, and the town is inhabited by about four hundred families. The merchants dwell not here, but only reside awhile, when the galleons come from or go for Spain, by reason of the unhealthiness of the air, occasioned by vapours from the mountains; so that though their chief warehouses are at Puerto Bello, their habitations are at Panama, whence they bring the plate upon mules, when the fair begins, and when the ships belonging to the company of negroes arrive to sell slaves.

Captain Morgan, who knew very well all the avenues of this city and the neighbouring coasts, arrived in the dusk of the evening at Puerto de Naos, ten leagues to the west of Puerto Bello. Being come hither, they sailed up the river to another harbour called Puerto Pontin, where they anchored: here they put themselves into boats and canoes, leaving in the ships only a few men to bring them next day to the port. About midnight they came to a place called Estera longa Lemos, where they all went on shore, and marched by land to the first posts of the city: they had in their company an Englishman, formerly a prisoner in those parts, who now served them for a guide: to him and three or four more they gave commission to take the sentinel, if possible, or kill him on the place: but they seized him so cunningly, as he had no time to give warning with his musket, or make any noise, and brought him, with his hands bound, to Captain Morgan, who asked him how things went in the city, and what forces they had; with other circumstances he desired to know. After every question they made him a thousand menaces to kill him, if he declared not the truth. Then they advanced to the city, carrying the said sentinel bound before them: having marched about a quarter of a league, they came to the castle near the city, which presently they closely surrounded, so that no person could get either in or out.

Being posted under the walls of the castle, Captain Morgan commanded the sentinel, whom they had taken prisoner, to speak to those within, charging them to surrender to his discretion; otherwise they should all be cut in pieces, without quarter. But they regarding none of these threats, began instantly to fire, which alarmed the city; yet notwithstanding, though the governor and soldiers of the said castle made as great resistance as could be, they were forced to surrender. Having taken the castle, they resolved to be as good as their words, putting the Spaniards to the sword, thereby to strike a terror into the rest of the city. Whereupon, having shut up all the soldiers and officers as prisoners into one room, they set fire to the powder (whereof they found great quantity) and blew up the castle into the air, with all the Spaniards that were within. This done, they pursued the course of their victory, falling upon the city, which, as yet, was not ready to receive them. Many of the inhabitants cast their precious jewels and money into wells and cisterns, or hid them in places underground, to avoid, as much as possible, being totally robbed. One of the party of pirates, assigned to this purpose, ran immediately to the cloisters, and took as many religious men and women as they could find. The governor of the city, not being able to rally the citizens, through their great confusion, retired to one of the castles remaining, and thence fired incessantly at the pirates: but these were not in the least negligent either to assault him, or defend themselves, so that amidst the horror of the assault, they made very few shots in vain; for aiming with great dexterity at the mouths of the guns, the Spaniards were certain to lose one or two men every time they charged each gun anew.

This continued very furious from break of day till noon; yea, about this time of the day the case was very dubious which party should conquer, or be conquered. At last, the pirates perceiving they had lost many men, and yet advanced but little towards gaining either this, or the other castles, made use of fire-balls, which they threw with their hands, designing to burn the doors of the castles; but the Spaniards from the walls let fall great quantities of stones, and earthen pots full of powder, and other combustible matter, which forced them to desist. Captain Morgan seeing this generous defence made by the Spaniards, began to despair of success. Hereupon, many faint and calm meditations came into his mind; neither could he determine which way to turn himself in that strait. Being thus puzzled, he was suddenly animated to continue the assault, by seeing English colours put forth at one of the lesser castles, then entered by his men; of whom he presently after spied a troop coming to meet him, proclaiming victory with loud shouts of joy. This instantly put him on new resolutions of taking the rest of the castles, especially seeing the chiefest citizens were fled to them, and had conveyed thither great part of their riches, with all the plate belonging to the churches and divine service.

To this effect, he ordered ten or twelve ladders to be made in all haste, so broad, that three or four men at once might ascend them: these being finished, he commanded all the religious men and women, whom he had taken prisoners, to fix them against the walls of the castle. This he had before threatened the governor to do, if he delivered not the castle: but his answer was, "he would never surrender himself alive." Captain Morgan was persuaded the governor would not employ his utmost force, seeing the religious women, and ecclesiastical persons, exposed in the front of the soldiers to the greatest danger. Thus the ladders, as I have said, were put into the hands of religious persons of both sexes, and these were forced, at the head of the companies, to raise and apply them to the walls: but Captain Morgan was fully deceived in his judgment of this design; for the governor, who acted like a brave soldier in performance of his duty, used his utmost endeavour to destroy whosoever came near the walls. The religious men and women ceased not to cry to him, and beg of him, by all the saints of heaven, to deliver the castle, and spare both his and their own lives; but nothing could prevail with his obstinacy and fierceness. Thus many of the religious men and nuns were killed before they could fix the ladders; which at last being done, though with great loss of the said religious people, the pirates mounted them in great numbers, and with not less valour, having fire-balls in their hands, and earthen pots full of powder; all which things, being now at the top of the walls, they kindled and cast in among the Spaniards.

This effort of the pirates was very great, insomuch that the Spaniards could no longer resist nor defend the castle, which was now entered. Hereupon they all threw down their arms, and craved quarter for their lives; only the governor of the city would crave no mercy, but killed many of the pirates with his own hands, and not a few of his own soldiers; because they did not stand to their arms. And though the pirates asked him if he would have quarter; yet he constantly answered, "By no means, I had rather die as a valiant soldier, than be hanged as a coward." They endeavoured as much as they could to take him prisoner, but he defended himself so obstinately, that they were forced to kill him, notwithstanding all the cries and tears of his own wife and daughter, who begged him, on their knees, to demand quarter, and save his life. When the pirates had possessed themselves of the castle, which was about night, they enclosed therein all the prisoners, placing the women and men by themselves, with some guards: the wounded were put in an apartment by itself, that their own complaints might be the cure of their diseases; for no other was afforded them.

This done, they fell to eating and drinking, as usual; that is, committing in both all manner of debauchery and excess, so that fifty courageous men might easily have retaken the city, and killed all the pirates. Next day, having plundered all they could find, they examined some of the prisoners (who had been persuaded by their companions to say they were the richest of the town), charging them severely to discover where they had hid their riches and goods. Not being able to extort anything from them, they not being the right persons, it was resolved to torture them: this they did so cruelly, that many of them died on the rack, or presently after. Now the president of Panama being advertised of the pillage and ruin of Puerto Bello, he employed all his care and industry to raise forces to pursue and cast out the pirates thence; but these cared little for his preparations, having their ships at hand, and determining to fire the city, and retreat. They had now been at Puerto Bello fifteen days, in which time they had lost many of their men, both by the unhealthiness of the country, and their extravagant debaucheries.

Hereupon, they prepared to depart, carrying on board all the pillage they had got, having first provided the fleet with sufficient victuals for the voyage. While these things were doing, Captain Morgan demanded of the prisoners a ransom for the city, or else he would burn it down, and blow up all the castles; withal, he commanded them to send speedily two persons, to procure the sum, which was 100,000 pieces of eight. To this effect two men were sent to the president of Panama, who gave him an account of all. The president, having now a body of men ready, set forth towards Puerto Bello, to encounter the pirates before their retreat; but, they, hearing of his coming, instead of flying away, went out to meet him at a narrow passage, which he must pass: here they placed a hundred men, very well armed, which at the first encounter put to flight a good party of those of Panama. This obliged the president to retire for that time, not being yet in a posture of strength to proceed farther. Presently after, he sent a message to Captain Morgan, to tell him, "that if he departed not suddenly with all his forces from Puerto Bello, he ought to expect no quarter for himself, nor his companions, when he should take them, as he hoped soon to do." Captain Morgan, who feared not his threats, knowing he had a secure retreat in his ships, which were at hand, answered, "he would not deliver the castles, before he had received the contribution money he had demanded; which if it were not paid down, he would certainly burn the whole city, and then leave it, demolishing beforehand the castles, and killing the prisoners."

The governor of Panama perceived by this answer that no means would serve to mollify the hearts of the pirates, nor reduce them to reason: hereupon, he determined to leave them, as also those of the city whom he came to relieve, involved in the difficulties of making the best agreement they could. Thus in a few days more the miserable citizens gathered the contributions required, and brought 100,000 pieces of eight to the pirates for a ransom of their cruel captivity: but the president of Panama was much amazed to consider that four hundred men could take such a great city, with so many strong castles, especially having no ordnance, wherewith to raise batteries, and, what was more, knowing the citizens of Puerto Bello had always great repute of being good soldiers themselves, and who never wanted courage in their own defence. This astonishment was so great, as made him send to Captain Morgan, desiring some small pattern of those arms wherewith he had taken with much vigour so great a city. Captain Morgan received this messenger very kindly, and with great civility; and gave him a pistol, and a few small bullets, to carry back to the president his master; telling him, withal, "he desired him to accept that slender pattern of the arms wherewith he had taken Puerto Bello, and keep them for a twelvemonth; after which time he promised to come to Panama, and fetch them away." The governor returned the present very soon to Captain Morgan, giving him thanks for the favour of lending him such weapons as he needed not; and, withal, sent him a ring of gold, with this message, "that he desired him not to give himself the labour of coming to Panama, as he had done to Puerto Bello: for he did assure him, he should not speed so well here, as he had done there."

After this, Captain Morgan (having provided his fleet with all necessaries, and taken with him the best guns of the castles, nailing up the rest) set sail from Puerto Bello with all his ships, and arriving in a few days at Cuba, he sought out a place wherein he might quickly make the dividend of their spoil. They found in ready money 250,000 pieces of eight, besides other merchandises; as cloth, linen, silks, &c. With this rich purchase they sailed thence to their common place of rendezvous, Jamaica. Being arrived, they passed here some time in all sorts of vices and debaucheries, according to their custom; spending very prodigally what others had gained with no small labour and toil.

Глава 25

Сквозь ад русской революции. Воспоминания гардемарина. 1914–1919. Глава 25

В августе 1919 года верховное командование красных решило покончить с Северо-западной армией, которая в это время приблизилась на опасное расстояние к Петрограду. На позициях красных за линией фронта наблюдались признаки повышенной активности, пленные сообщали о ежедневном прибытии на фронт свежих красных дивизий. Мы ожидали крупного наступления каждое утро и пытались предотвратить главный удар. Но еще до того, как красные выбрали время для его нанесения, мы получили приказ штаба о всеобщем отступлении. Большинство железнодорожных путей и шоссе между Петроградом и границей Эстонии тянулись по прямой линии с востока на запад, но по каким-то непонятным причинам было приказано оставить главные пути и отступать в юго-западном направлении. Лишь бронепоезда были вынуждены двигаться на запад по основному пути на Ямбург, нам дали указания обеспечивать их свободное прохождение до тех пор, пока последняя воинская часть не перейдет железнодорожное полотно с севера. Во время отступления нервозность всегда достигает апогея, все становится возможным, когда войска перемещаются по проселочным дорогам в стороне от известных им ориентиров. Когда белые пехотинцы отступили за железнодорожные пути, противник совершил рывок вперед вдоль прибрежного шоссе, тянувшегося параллельно железной дороге. На другой день мы все еще находились на расстоянии примерно 50 миль к востоку от Ямбурга и стояли перед угрозой быть отрезанными от своей базы.

1871 - 1914

From 1871 to 1914

From the end of the Franco-Prussian War in 1871 to the beginning of World War I in 1914.

Иллюстрации

«Шнелльботы». Германские торпедные катера Второй мировой войны. Иллюстрации

XVII. Обвинение

Побег из ГУЛАГа. Часть 1. XVII. Обвинение

Семь допросов, следовавших один за другим, приводили меня во все большее недоумение: грозили расстрелом, но ни в чем конкретном не обвиняли. При таком положении меня так же легко было расстрелять, как и выпустить на волю. Чтобы понапрасну не терзаться бессмысленными в этих стенах вопросами, самое разумное было бы признать, что ничего, кроме произвола, в ГПУ нет, что следователи допрашивают отчасти, чтобы провести служебное время, отчасти про запас — не сболтнешь ли чего лишнего. Но успокоиться на этом очень трудно, и, чтобы предугадать свою судьбу, оставалось заниматься наблюдениями над другими заключенными и следить, по возможности, за их судьбой. Женщины легко делились по предъявляемым им обвинениям на группы, и приговоры были также типизированы по этим общим признакам, а совершенно не по степени их личной вины, если бы таковая обнаруживалась. Самой многочисленной была категория «жен», куда, по существу, надо было отнести также сестер, племянниц, матерей, а иногда и бабушек. Некоторые семьи были представлены тремя поколениями, многие — двумя. Заключение их в тюрьму называлось «мерой социального воздействия» и направлялось против главного арестованного, они же сами в счет не шли. Жен тревожили допросами, остальных же, большей частью, просто держали, чтобы лишить их родственника всякой помощи и угнетающе действовать на его психику. В приговорах женам обыкновенно определяли наказание на одну степень легче, чем мужу, даже если они не имели никакого отношения «к делу», по которому привлекали его.

Глава XIV

Путешествие натуралиста вокруг света на корабле «Бигль». Глава XIV. Чилоэ и Консепсьон. Сильное землетрясение

Сан-Карлос, Чилоэ Извержение Ocopno одновременное с извержением Аконкагуа и Косегуины Поездка в Кукао Непроходимые леса Вальдивия Индейцы Землетрясение Консепсьон Сильное землетрясение Трещины в горных породах Вид разрушенных городов Почерневшее и бурлящее море Направление колебаний Перекос камней в зданиях Огромная волна Устойчивое поднятие суши Область, охваченная вулканическими явлениями Связь между подъемлющей и эруптивной силами Причина землетрясений Медленное поднятие горных цепей 15 января мы вышли из гавани Лоу и через три дня бросили якорь вторично в бухте Сан-Карлос на Чилоэ. Ночью 19-го числа мы видели вулкан Осорно в действии. В полночь вахтенный заметил нечто вроде большой звезды, которая постепенно увеличивалась в размерах часов до трех и тогда явила собой великолепное зрелище. Через подзорную трубу мы видели, как какие-то темные тела непрерывно взлетали кверху одно за другим и падали вниз среди огромного ярко-красного зарева. Свет его был настолько силен, что оставлял длинное и яркое отражение в воде. Большие массы расплавленного вещества, по-видимому, очень часто извергаются кратерами в этой части Кордильер. Меня уверяли, что во время извержения Корковадо выбрасывает вверх огромные массы, и видно, как они взрываются в воздухе, принимая разнообразные фантастические формы, например деревьев; размеры их, должно быть, колоссальны, ибо их можно разглядеть с возвышенности за Сан-Карлосом, отстоящей не меньше чем за 93 мили от Корковадо.

Список схем

Короли подплава в море червонных валетов. Список иллюстраций. Список схем

10. Абсурдность плана

Записки «вредителя». Часть I. Время террора. 10. Абсурдность плана

Долго еще говорили спецы, указывая в осторожной форме на абсурдность плана, обращая внимание на то, что Мурманская одноколейная железная дорога и в настоящее время не справляется с перевозками, при намеченном же развитии промысла потребуется: для перевозки одной рыбы около 200 вагонов в день, не говоря уже о других грузах. Необходимо тотчас же приступить к постройке второй колеи. Это дело нелегкое, так как длина дороги 1 500 километров, и проходит она по горной, а местами сильно заболоченной местности. А рабочая сила? В Мурманске всего 12 000 жителей, но и теперь жилищная нужда ужасающая. При намеченном развитии промысла число рабочих не может быть меньше 50 000 человек, что вместе с семьями составит около 200 000 человек. Для такого населения нужно построить не только дома, но школы, баню, магазины, канализацию, электростанцию и прочее, это, в свою очередь, поведет к дальнейшему увеличению населения. Собственно говоря, для выполнения задания надо создать город с населением в 250 000 жителей. Постройка нового города и прокладка железнодорожного пути не могут производиться рыбопромышленным предприятием. Между тем без осуществления этих работ план не может быть выполнен. Подготовка судовых команд также представляет немалые затруднения: для обслуживания 500 траулеров потребуется 25 000 человек с дипломом, разрешающим управление судами, штурманский состав и такое же количество судовых механиков. Только для пополнения ежегодной убыли потребуется в год по 300 штурманов и 300 механиков. При этом штурманский состав должен иметь специальную подготовку и не только управлять судном, но и уметь найти рыбу, добыть ее и обработать.

2100 - 1550 BC

From 2100 - 1550 BC

Middle Bronze Age. From the beginning of the Middle Kingdom of Egypt in 2100-2000 BC through its decline to the New Kingdom of Egypt establishment in c. 1550 BC.

Результаты действий германских торпедных катеров во Второй Мировой войне

«Шнелльботы». Германские торпедные катера Второй мировой войны. «Шнелльботы» на войне. Результаты действий германских торпедных катеров во Второй Мировой войне

[ Открыть таблицу в новом окне ] ТВД 1939 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 Всего по каждому ТВД Северное море и Ла-Манш Потоплено - 22 ТР (47 834 брт), 3 ЭМ, 1 ММ, 4 ТРЛ 30 ТР (64 356 брт), 1 ЭМ 20 ТР (34 537 брт), 2 ЭМ, 7 ТРЛ, 1 ДК, 2 кат. 6 ТР (15 138 брт), 1 ЭМ, 7 ТРЛ, 1 ДК 12 ТР (23 885 брт), 4 ТРЛ, 9 ДК, 2 ВСУ, 4 кат. 5 ТР (10 222 брт), 1 ДК, 2 кат. 95 ТР (195 972 брт), 7 ЭМ, 1 ММ, 22 ТРЛ, 12 ДК, 2 ВСУ, 8 кат. Повреждено - 5 ТР (20 548 брт), 2 ЭМ 4 ТР (18 091 брт) 4 ТР (4 387 брт) 1 ТР (2 820 брт) 7 ТР (50 036 брт), 1 КРЛ, 3 ЭМ и ФР, 1 ТЩ, 2 ДК, 1 ВСУ - 20 ТР (95 882 брт), 1 КРЛ, 5 ЭМ и ФР, 1 ТЩ, 2 ДК, 1 ВСУ Средиземномое море Потоплено - - - 1 ТР (12 436 брт), 2 ТЩ, 1 ВСУ, 10 кат. 1 ТР (4 572 брт), 3 ЭМ, 1 КЛ,

24. Свидание

Записки «вредителя». Часть II. Тюрьма. 24. Свидание

Я стоял посреди нашего загона, стараясь ничего не слышать и увидеть сына. Наконец я увидел его. Он стоял у самой решетки, крепко вцепившись в нее; он кричал мне, делал мне знаки, звал. Я бросился к нему, прорвался сквозь толпу заключенных, но не мог добраться до решетки: — Пустите, пустите, ради Бога, — кричал я тем, кто плотно облепил решетку, но никто не слышал меня и не обращал внимания. Каждый видел перед собой только дорогое ему лицо, каждый напрягал все силы, чтобы услышать последние слова. Я пытался силой оттолкнуть одного из них. Он на секунду обернулся ко мне: лицо его было мокро от слез, глаза ничего не видели, не понимали, и он опять судорожно вцепился в решетку. В полном отчаянии, видя, что время уходит, я силой двинулся вперед, налег плечом, ухватился одной рукой за решетку. Послышался глухой треск, все хитроумное сооружение резко наклонилось, к нам бросилась стража, решетку поддержали, чем-то подперли, но мне удалось в это время притиснуться к ней вплотную, и я мог видеть сына и улавливать его слова, которые он кричал изо всей силы. — Мама в тюрьме, — доносилось до меня сквозь гул и стоны человеческих воплей. — Я ношу ей передачу. Свидания мне не дают. Она раз мне прислала письмо, — надрывался мой бедный мальчик. — Как живет N.? — спрашивал я про одного близкого человека, которого я думал просить взять к себе нашего сына, если жену также сошлют. — Она в тюрьме. — A N.N.? — Она тоже в тюрьме. Миша тоже один.

Chapter XIII

The voyage of the Beagle. Chapter XIII. Chiloe and Chonos Islands

Chiloe General Aspect Boat Excursion Native Indians Castro Tame Fox Ascend San Pedro Chonos Archipelago Peninsula of Tres Montes Granitic Range Boat-wrecked Sailors Low's Harbour Wild Potato Formation of Peat Myopotamus, Otter and Mice Cheucau and Barking-bird Opetiorhynchus Singular Character of Ornithology Petrels NOVEMBER 10th.—The Beagle sailed from Valparaiso to the south, for the purpose of surveying the southern part of Chile, the island of Chiloe, and the broken land called the Chonos Archipelago, as far south as the Peninsula of Tres Montes. On the 21st we anchored in the bay of S. Carlos, the capital of Chiloe. This island is about ninety miles long, with a breadth of rather less than thirty. The land is hilly, but not mountainous, and is covered by one great forest, except where a few green patches have been cleared round the thatched cottages. From a distance the view somewhat resembles that of Tierra del Fuego; but the woods, when seen nearer, are incomparably more beautiful. Many kinds of fine evergreen trees, and plants with a tropical character, here take the place of the gloomy beech of the southern shores. In winter the climate is detestable, and in summer it is only a little better. I should think there are few parts of the world, within the temperate regions, where so much rain falls. The winds are very boisterous, and the sky almost always clouded: to have a week of fine weather is something wonderful.

17. Рейтинг безумия. Версии гибели группы Дятлова на любые вкус и цвет

Перевал Дятлова. Смерть, идущая по следу... 17. Рейтинг безумия. Версии гибели группы Дятлова на любые вкус и цвет

Поскольку таковых версий существует великое множество, имеет смысл их каким-то образом классифицировать. Оптимальной представляется классификация, принятая на большинстве тематических форумов и сайтах, так что не станем изобретать велосипед и воспользуемся ею в качестве образца. Итак, всё многообразие версий можно свести к трём большим несхожим группам, объясняющим гибель группы воздействием факторов следующего характера: - естественно-природного; - паранормального; - криминального. Е с т е с т в е н н о - п р и р о д н ы е, как явствует из самого названия, пытаются объяснить трагические события на склоне Холат-Сяхыл природными явлениями и оперируют естественнонаучными фактами и представлениями в пределах компетенции авторов. Наиболее аргументированной из всех версий этой категории представляется предположение Евгения Вадимовича Буянова, петербургского исследователя "дятловской" трагедии, о произошедшем на месте установки палатки сходе лавины. Эту версию Евгений Вадимович обосновал в книге "Тайна аварии Дятлова", написанной в соавторстве с Борисом Ефимовичем Слобцовым, неоднократно упоминавшимся в настоящем очерке участнике поисковой операции. Нельзя не отметить, что книга получилась очень познавательной, даже о весьма скучных сугубо технических и математических материях авторы сумели написать живо и занимательно. Книгу эту можно рекомендовать к прочтению даже с целью простого расширения кругозора - время не будет потрачено зря.