Chapter X


Of the Island of Cuba
Captain Morgan attempts to preserve the Isle of St. Catherine as a refuge to the nest of pirates, but fails of his design
He arrives at and takes the village of El Puerto del Principe.


CAPTAIN MORGAN seeing his predecessor and admiral Mansvelt were dead, used all the means that were possible, to keep in possession the isle of St. Catherine, seated near Cuba. His chief intent was to make it a refuge and sanctuary to the pirates of those parts, putting it in a condition of being a convenient receptacle of their preys and robberies. To this effect he left no stone unmoved, writing to several merchants in Virginia and New England, persuading them to send him provisions and necessaries, towards putting the said island in such a posture of defence, as to fear no danger of invasion from any side. But all this proved ineffectual, by the Spaniards retaking the said island: yet Captain Morgan retained his courage, which put him on new designs. First, he equipped a ship, in order to gather a fleet as great, and as strong as he could. By degrees he effected it, and gave orders to every member of his fleet to meet at a certain port of Cuba, there determining to call a council, and deliberate what was best to be done, and what place first to fall upon. Leaving these preparations in this condition, I shall give my reader some small account of the said isle of Cuba, in whose port this expedition was hatched, seeing I omitted to do it in its proper place.

Cuba lies from east to west, in north latitude, from 20 to 23 deg. in length one hundred and fifty German leagues, and about forty in breadth. Its fertility is equal to that of Hispaniola; besides which, it affords many things proper for trading and commerce; such as hides of several beasts, particularly those that in Europe are called hides of Havanna. On all sides it is surrounded with many small islands, called the Cayos: these little islands the pirates use as ports of refuge. Here they have their meetings, and hold their councils, how best to assault the Spaniards. It is watered on all sides with plentiful and pleasant rivers, whose entries form both secure and spacious ports; beside many other harbours for ships, which along the calm shores and coasts adorn this rich and beautiful island; all which contribute much to its happiness, by facilitating trade, whereto they invited both natives and aliens. The chief of these ports are San Jago, Byame, Santa Maria, Espiritu Santo, Trinidad, Zagoa, Cabo de Corientes, and others, on the south side of the island: on the north side are, La Havanna, Puerto Mariano, Santa Cruz, Mata Ricos, and Barracoa.

This island hath two chief cities, to which all the towns and villages thereof give obedience. The first is Santa Jago, or St. James, seated on the south side, and having under its jurisdiction one half of the island. The chief magistrates hereof are a bishop and a governor, who command the villages and towns of the said half. The chief of these are, on the south side, Espiritu Santo, Puerto del Principe, and Bayame. On the north it has Barracoa, and De los Cayos. The greatest part of the commerce driven here comes from the Canaries, whither they transport much tobacco, sugar, and hides, which sort of merchandise are drawn to the head city from the subordinate towns and villages. Formerly the city of Santa Jago was miserably sacked by the pirates of Jamaica and Tortuga, though it is defended by a considerable castle.

The city and port De la Havanna lies between the north and west side of the island: this is one of the strongest places of the West Indies; its jurisdiction extends over the other half of the island; the chief places under it being Santa Cruz on the north side, and La Trinidad on the south. Hence is transported huge quantities of tobacco, which is sent to New Spain and Costa Rica, even as far as the South Sea, besides many ships laden with this commodity, that are consigned to Spain and other parts of Europe, not only in the leaf, but in rolls. This city is defended by three castles, very great and strong, two of which lie towards the port, and the other is seated on a hill that commands the town. It is esteemed to contain about ten thousand families. The merchants of this place trade in New Spain, Campechy, Honduras, and Florida. All ships that come from the parts before mentioned, as also from Caraccas, Carthagena and Costa Rica, are necessitated to take their provisions in at Havanna to make their voyage for Spain; this being the necessary and straight course they must steer for the south of Europe, and other parts. The plate-fleet of Spain, which the Spaniards call Flota, being homeward bound, touches here yearly to complete their cargo with hides, tobacco, and Campechy wood.

Captain Morgan had been but two months in these ports of the south of Cuba, when he had got together a fleet of twelve sail, between ships and great boats, with seven hundred fighting men, part English and part French. They called a council, and some advised to assault the city of Havanna in the night, which they said might easily be done, if they could but take any of the ecclesiastics; yea, that the city might be sacked before the castles could put themselves in a posture of defence. Others propounded, according to their several opinions, other attempts; but the former proposal was rejected, because many of the pirates, who had been prisoners at other times in the said city, affirmed nothing of consequence could be done with less than one thousand five hundred men. Moreover, that with all these people, they ought first go to the island De los Pinos, and land them in small boats about Matamona, fourteen leagues from the said city, whereby to accomplish their designs.

Finally, they saw no possibility of gathering so great a fleet, and hereupon, with what they had, they concluded to attempt some other place. Among the rest, one propounded they should assault the town of El Puerto del Principe. This proposition he persuaded to, by saying he knew that place very well, and that being at a distance from sea, it never was sacked by any pirates, whereby the inhabitants were rich, exercising their trade by ready money, with those of Havanna who kept here an established commerce, chiefly in hides. This proposal was presently admitted by Captain Morgan, and the chief of his companions. Hereupon they ordered every captain to weigh anchor and set sail, steering towards that coast nearest to El Puerto del Principe. Here is a bay named by the Spaniards El Puerto de Santa Maria: being arrived at this bay, a Spaniard, who was prisoner aboard the fleet, swam ashore by night to the town of El Puerto del Principe, giving an account to the inhabitants of the design of the pirates, which he overheard in their discourse, while they thought he did not understand English. The Spaniards upon this advice began to hide their riches, and carry away their movables; the governor immediately raised all the people of the town, freemen and slaves, and with part of them took a post by which of necessity the pirates must pass, and commanded many trees to be cut down and laid cross the ways to hinder their passage, placing several ambuscades strengthened with some pieces of cannon to play upon them on their march. He gathered in all about eight hundred men, of which detaching part into the said ambuscades, with the rest he begirt the town, drawing them up in a spacious field, whence they could see the coming of the pirates at length.

Captain Morgan, with his men, now on the march, found the avenues to the town unpassable; hereupon they took their way through the wood, traversing it with great difficulty, whereby they escaped divers ambuscades; at last they came to the plain, from its figure called by the Spaniards La Savanna, or the Sheet. The governor seeing them come, detached a troop of horse to charge them in the front, thinking to disperse them, and to pursue them with his main body: but this design succeeded not, for the pirates marched in very good order, at the sound of their drums, and with flying colours; coming near the horse they drew into a semicircle, and so advanced towards the Spaniards, who charged them valiantly for a while; but the pirates being very dextrous at their arms, and their governor, with many of their companions, being killed, they retreated towards the wood, to save themselves with more advantage; but before they could reach it, most of them were unfortunately killed by the pirates. Thus they left the victory to these new-come enemies, who had no considerable loss of men in the battle, and but very few wounded. The skirmish lasted four hours: they entered the town not without great resistance of such as were within, who defended themselves as long as possible, and many seeing the enemy in the town, shut themselves up in their own houses, and thence made several shots upon the pirates; who thereupon threatened them, saying, "If you surrender not voluntarily, you shall soon see the town in a flame, and your wives and children torn to pieces before your faces." Upon these menaces the Spaniards submitted to the discretion of the pirates, believing they could not continue there long.

As soon as the pirates had possessed themselves of the town, they enclosed all the Spaniards, men, women, children, and slaves, in several churches, and pillaged all the goods they could find; then they searched the country round about, bringing in daily many goods and prisoners, with much provision. With this they fell to making great cheer, after their old custom, without remembering the poor prisoners, whom they let starve in the churches, though they tormented them daily and inhumanly to make them confess where they had hid their goods, money, etc., though little or nothing was left them, not sparing the women and little children, giving them nothing to eat, whereby the greatest part perished.

Pillage and provisions growing scarce, they thought convenient to depart and seek new fortunes in other places; they told the prisoners, "they should find money to ransom themselves, else they should be all transported to Jamaica; and beside, if they did not pay a second ransom for the town, they would turn every house into ashes." The Spaniards hereupon nominated among themselves four fellow-prisoners to go and seek for the above-mentioned contributions; but the pirates, to the intent that they should return speedily with those ransoms, tormented several cruelly in their presence, before they departed. After a few days, the Spaniards returned, telling Captain Morgan, "We have ran up and down, and searched all the neighbouring woods and places we most suspected, and yet have not been able to find any of our own party, nor consequently any fruit of our embassy; but if you are pleased to have a little longer patience with us, we shall certainly cause all that you demand to be paid within fifteen days;" which Captain Morgan granted. But not long after, there came into the town seven or eight pirates who had been ranging in the woods and fields, and got considerable booty. These brought amongst other prisoners, a negro, whom they had taken with letters. Captain Morgan having perused them, found that they were from the governor of Santa Jago, being written to some of the prisoners, wherein he told them, "they should not make too much haste to pay any ransom for their town or persons, or any other pretext; but on the contrary, they should put off the pirates as well as they could with excuses and delays, expecting to be relieved by him in a short time, when he would certainly come to their aid." Upon this intelligence Captain Morgan immediately ordered all their plunder to be carried aboard; and withal, he told the Spaniards, that the very next day they should pay their ransoms, for he would not wait a moment longer, but reduce the whole town to ashes, if they failed of the sum he demanded.

With this intimation, Captain Morgan made no mention to the Spaniards of the letters he had intercepted. They answered, "that it was impossible for them to give such a sum of money in so short a space of time, seeing their fellow-townsmen were not to be found in all the country thereabouts." Captain Morgan knew full well their intentions, but thought it not convenient to stay there any longer, demanding of them only five hundred oxen or cows, with sufficient salt to powder them, with this condition, that they should carry them on board his ships. Thus he departed with all his men, taking with him only six of the principal prisoners as pledges. Next day the Spaniards brought the cattle and salt to the ships, and required the prisoners; but Captain Morgan refused to deliver them, till they had helped his men to kill and salt the beeves: this was performed in great haste, he not caring to stay there any longer, lest he should be surprised by the forces that were gathering against him; and having received all on board his vessels, he set at liberty the hostages. Meanwhile there happened some dissensions between the English and the French: the occasion was as follows: A Frenchman being employed in killing and salting the beeves, an English pirate took away the marrow-bones he had taken out of the ox, which these people esteem much; hereupon they challenged one another: being come to the place of duel, the Englishman stabbed the Frenchman in the back, whereby he fell down dead. The other Frenchmen, desirous of revenge, made an insurrection against the English; but Captain Morgan soon appeased them, by putting the criminal in chains to be carried to Jamaica, promising he would see justice done upon him; for though he might challenge his adversary, yet it was not lawful to kill him treacherously, as he did.

All things being ready, and on board, and the prisoners set at liberty, they sailed thence to a certain island, where Captain Morgan intended to make a dividend of what they had purchased in that voyage; where being arrived, they found nigh the value of fifty thousand pieces of eight in money and goods; the sum being known, it caused a general grief to see such a small purchase, not sufficient to pay their debts at Jamaica. Hereupon Captain Morgan proposed they should think on some other enterprise and pillage before they returned. But the French not being able to agree with the English, left Captain Morgan with those of his own nation, notwithstanding all the persuasions he used to reduce them to continue in his company. Thus they parted with all external signs of friendship, Captain Morgan reiterating his promises to them that he would see justice done on that criminal. This he performed; for being arrived at Jamaica, he caused him to be hanged, which was all the satisfaction the French pirates could expect.

Chapter VI

The pirates of Panama or The buccaneers of America : Chapter VI

Of the origin of Francis Lolonois, and the beginning of his robberies. FRANCIS LOLONOIS was a native of that territory in France which is called Les Sables d'Olone, or The Sands of Olone. In his youth he was transported to the Caribbee islands, in quality of servant, or slave, according to custom; of which we have already spoken. Being out of his time, he came to Hispaniola; here he joined for some time with the hunters, before he began his robberies upon the Spaniards, which I shall now relate, till his unfortunate death. At first he made two or three voyages as a common mariner, wherein he behaved himself so courageously as to gain the favour of the governor of Tortuga, Monsieur de la Place; insomuch that he gave him a ship, in which he might seek his fortune, which was very favourable to him at first; for in a short time he got great riches. But his cruelties against the Spaniards were such, that the fame of them made him so well known through the Indies, that the Spaniards, in his time, would choose rather to die, or sink fighting, than surrender, knowing they should have no mercy at his hands. But Fortune, being seldom constant, after some time turned her back; for in a huge storm he lost his ship on the coast of Campechy. The men were all saved, but coming upon dry land, the Spaniards pursued them, and killed the greatest part, wounding also Lolonois.

20. В «Кресты»

Записки «вредителя». Часть II. Тюрьма. 20. В «Кресты»

Утром 25 января 1931 года узнали, что пятьсот человек назначены в «Кресты». ГПУ получило там в свое ведение второй корпус, до этого времени занятый уголовными. Началась всеобщая сумятица. Многие, особенно старожилы, сильно приуныли: при переводе они теряли все свои преимущества. Кроме того, мы все горевали, предвидя потерю всех мелких, но драгоценных для нас вещей: иголки, обрывки веревочек, самодельные ножи — все это должно было пропасть при обыске во время перевода. Беспорядок и суматоха, поднятые начальством, требовавшим мгновенного исполнения приказов, были удручающими. Часами стояли мы в камере для обыска, чтобы подвергнуться этой унизительной процедуре: часами нас проверяли, записывали, считали и пересчитывали, часами ждали мы «черного ворона», который, переполненный до отказа, перевозил нас партиями на другую сторону Невы, в «Кресты». Ожидающих перевозки, уже обысканных, просчитанных и записанных, охраняла уже не тюремная стража, которой не хватало, а простые солдаты из войск ГПУ. Конвойные с любопытством оглядывали нас, крадучись вступали в беседу. — За что, товарищ, сидишь? — Кто его знает, сам не знаю, — был обычный ответ. — Вот, поди ты, все вот так. За что только народ в тюрьмах держат! Воры те свободно по улицам ходят, а хороших людей — по тюрьмам держат. — Тише ты, — останавливал его другой конвойный, — видишь, шпик, — кивнул он головой на подходившего тюремного надзирателя. Дошла и моя очередь. Втиснули в набитый до отказа тюремный фургон, так что последних приминали дверцами; помчали.

Примечания

Борьба за Красный Петроград. Примечания

{1} Везде в не оговоренных случаях курсив в цитатах наш. — Н. К. {2} В октябре 1917 г. Главное артиллерийское управление «своим попечением» направило в Новочеркасский артиллерийский склад 10 000 винтовок из Петрограда и 12 800 винтовок из Москвы. Как первая, так и вторая партия оружия по назначению не дошли. Поэтому генерал М. В. Алексеев предлагал вновь дать наряд, значительно его увеличив — до 30 000 винтовок, и то на первое время. {3} Белое дело. Берлин: Изд-во «Медный всадник», 1926. Т. 1. С. 77–82. В этих последних заключительных словах генерала нельзя не отметить некоторой доли сомнения в своих начинаниях; ясная перспектива, нарисованная им, дала под конец основательную трещину. Фантазия, пленившая его в кабинете, должна была уступить хотя и незначительное, но все же заключительное место для соображении практического характера. Несколько позже, 9 февраля (27 января) 1918 г., генерал М. В. Алексеев в своем обращении во французскую миссию в г. Киеве вынужден был подтвердить свое заключение из цитированного выше письма от 8(21) ноября 1917 г. Он писал: «Идеи большевизма нашли приверженцев среди широкой массы казаков. Они не желают сражаться даже для защиты собственной территории, ради спасения своего достояния. Они глубоко убеждены, что большевизм направлен только против богатых классов — буржуазии и интеллигенции, а не против области, где сохранился порядок, где есть хлеб, уголь, железо, нефть» (Владимирова В. Год службы «социалистов» капиталистам: Очерки по истории контрреволюции в 1918 г./ Под ред. Я. А.

20. Последовательность событий на склоне Холат-Сяхыл в первом приближении

Перевал Дятлова. Смерть, идущая по следу... 20. Последовательность событий на склоне Холат-Сяхыл в первом приближении

Попробуем нарисовать общую картину произошедшего на склоне Холат-Сяхыл в первом, так сказать, приближении. Около 15:00, возможно несколько позже, в момент окончания установки палатки, когда оставалось лишь закрепить на растяжках конёк крыши, группа Игоря Дятлова столкнулась с угрозой физической расправы, которая исходила от вооружённых огнестрельным оружием людей. На самом начальном этапе развития конфликта от группы "дятловцев" отделились Тибо-Бриньоль и Золотарёв, которые наблюдали за происходившим у палатки с некоторого удаления, не имея ни малейшей возможности повлиять на ситуацию. Вооружённые люди в силу неких особых причин не ставили перед собой задачу убить туристов немедленно и возле палатки - они рассчитывали "выморозить" группу, выгнав её на холод. С этой целью неизвестные потребовали, чтобы "дятловцы" сняли обвуь, рукавицы и головные уборы. Во время раздевания возникли пререкания, последовали ответные угрозы со стороны туристов и они, скорее всего, проявили пассивное неподчинение. Можно предполагать, что в эти минуты особенно активно демонстрировали возмущение девушки, спровоцировав первое, пока незначительное, применение силы со стороны нападавших. Косвенно на это указывают разрывы деталей одежды Зины Колмогоровой (рукав свитера). Тогда же мог получить сильные разрывы нижней части штанины и Георгий Кривонищенко (тех самых шаровар, что впоследствии будут обнаружены на теле Людмилы Дубининой). Возможно, возникшую заварушку Рустем Слободин использовал для того, чтобы напасть на одного из тех, кто грозил оружием.

Chapter XII

The pirates of Panama or The buccaneers of America : Chapter XII

Captain Morgan takes the city of Maracaibo on the coast of Neuva Venezuela Piracies committed in those seas Ruin of three Spanish ships, set forth to hinder the robberies of the pirates. NOT long after their arrival at Jamaica, being that short time they needed to lavish away all the riches above mentioned, they concluded on another enterprise to seek new fortunes: to this effect Captain Morgan ordered all the commanders of his ships to meet at De la Vacca, or the Cow Isle, south of Hispaniola, as is said. Hither flocked to them great numbers of other pirates, French and English; the name of Captain Morgan being now famous in all the neighbouring countries for his great enterprises. There was then at Jamaica an English ship newly come from New England, well mounted with thirty-six guns: this vessel, by order of the governor of Jamaica, joined Captain Morgan to strengthen his fleet, and give him greater courage to attempt mighty things. With this supply Captain Morgan judged himself sufficiently strong; but there being in the same place another great vessel of twenty-four iron guns, and twelve brass ones, belonging to the French, Captain Morgan endeavoured also to join this ship to his own; but the French not daring to trust the English, denied absolutely to consent. The French pirates belonging to this great ship had met at sea an English vessel; and being under great want of victuals, they had taken some provisions out of the English ship, without paying for them, having, perhaps, no ready money aboard: only they gave them bills of exchange for Jamaica and Tortuga, to receive money there.

Глава 10

Сквозь ад русской революции. Воспоминания гардемарина. 1914–1919. Глава 10

Май 1917 года покончил со стадией перебранки и ознаменовал вступление в стадию разочарования в революции. Все находили развитие событий отвратительным, и никто не скрывал своих чувств. Больше не предпринималось искренних попыток обратить кого-либо в свою веру или убедить в чем-либо. Люди больше ничего не доказывали, они определились в убеждениях и отвечали смехом на каждый довод. Массы людей опасались, что революция окажется пустым звуком. Война продолжалась, как прежде, и, поскольку надежда на скорый мир отсутствовала, солдаты находились в постоянной готовности к суровым испытаниям. В положении трудящихся никаких чудодейственных изменений к лучшему не произошло. С ростом цен заводской рабочий с трудом сводил концы с концами. Крестьяне не могли понять, почему им надо дожидаться конституционного совещания для раздела земли, которую они в состоянии взять немедленно. Страной правили представители все тех же классов, которые прежде сформировали кабинет министров. Солдаты, рабочие и крестьяне стали проявлять признаки нетерпения и требовать доказательств, что в стране действительно утвердился новый порядок. Они относились с насмешками и вызовом к образованным классам, чью неприязнь к своим надеждам ощущали и чье сопротивление немедленным переменам приписывали эгоистическим мотивам. В своем стремлении получить от революции выгоды трудящиеся массы раскачивали государственный корабль до опасного крена. С другой стороны, националистически мыслящие группы, наблюдающие крушение Российской империи, тоже теряли веру во Временное правительство.

2100 - 1550 BC

From 2100 - 1550 BC

Middle Bronze Age. From the beginning of the Middle Kingdom of Egypt in 2100-2000 BC through its decline to the New Kingdom of Egypt establishment in c. 1550 BC.

323 г. до н.э. - 30 г. до н.э.

C 323 г. до н.э. по 30 г. до н.э.

Эллинистический период. От смерти Александра Великого в 323 г. до н.э. до римского завоевания Птолемейского Египта в 30 г. до н.э.

4. Сокол — он же Соков — он же Смирнов

Записки «вредителя». Часть II. Тюрьма. 4. Сокол — он же Соков — он же Смирнов

В камере все лежали, как полагается, в два слоя, сплошь, но никто не спал. Староста стоял в одном белье у своей первой койки; в противоположном конце камеры, у окна, стояли двое заключенных, тоже в одном белье: между ними и старостой шла перебранка — резкая и безнадежная. У дверей стоял вновь прибывший; в шубе, с вещами в руках, ошарашенный тюрьмой, арестом и скандалом, с которым его встретили: привезли в тюрьму, а здесь нет места. Он не представлял себе, что был уже сто десятым на двадцать два места. Я стоял, не проходя еще к своему ужасному логову. Меня вводили, тем временем, в курс происшествия. — Те двое — уголовные, бандиты. Их два места на полу около окна и умывальника. Места немного шире, чем под нарами, но холодные, так как окно открыто всю ночь. Новенького положить некуда, и староста направил его к ним третьим на два места. По камерным правилам староста распоряжается местами, но они не хотят подчиняться, считая, что староста может распоряжаться свободными местами, а класть на чужое место не может. — Куда ж его девать? — Уладится. Староста немного виноват: он приказал им пустить третьего, а не попросил, это их взорвало. Они ребята неплохие, хоть и настоящие бандиты — грабят магазины. Тот, поменьше, — это Сокол, или Соков, он же Смирнов, атаман. Второй — Ваня Ефимов из его шайки. Всего их сидит девять человек: двое у нас, шесть — по соседним камерам, один занят на кухне и спит в «рабочей камере». Следователь лишил их прогулок, чтобы они не могли переговариваться, и они просто сюда, к решетке, подходят. Отчаянный народ. Вот увидите, даже безногий придет.

Результаты действий германских торпедных катеров во Второй Мировой войне

«Шнелльботы». Германские торпедные катера Второй мировой войны. «Шнелльботы» на войне. Результаты действий германских торпедных катеров во Второй Мировой войне

[ Открыть таблицу в новом окне ] ТВД 1939 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 Всего по каждому ТВД Северное море и Ла-Манш Потоплено - 22 ТР (47 834 брт), 3 ЭМ, 1 ММ, 4 ТРЛ 30 ТР (64 356 брт), 1 ЭМ 20 ТР (34 537 брт), 2 ЭМ, 7 ТРЛ, 1 ДК, 2 кат. 6 ТР (15 138 брт), 1 ЭМ, 7 ТРЛ, 1 ДК 12 ТР (23 885 брт), 4 ТРЛ, 9 ДК, 2 ВСУ, 4 кат. 5 ТР (10 222 брт), 1 ДК, 2 кат. 95 ТР (195 972 брт), 7 ЭМ, 1 ММ, 22 ТРЛ, 12 ДК, 2 ВСУ, 8 кат. Повреждено - 5 ТР (20 548 брт), 2 ЭМ 4 ТР (18 091 брт) 4 ТР (4 387 брт) 1 ТР (2 820 брт) 7 ТР (50 036 брт), 1 КРЛ, 3 ЭМ и ФР, 1 ТЩ, 2 ДК, 1 ВСУ - 20 ТР (95 882 брт), 1 КРЛ, 5 ЭМ и ФР, 1 ТЩ, 2 ДК, 1 ВСУ Средиземномое море Потоплено - - - 1 ТР (12 436 брт), 2 ТЩ, 1 ВСУ, 10 кат. 1 ТР (4 572 брт), 3 ЭМ, 1 КЛ,

Cueva de las Manos

Cueva de las Manos. Some time between 11 000 and 7 500 BC.

The Cueva de las Manos in Patagonia (Argentina), a cave or a series of caves, is best known for its assemblage of cave art executed between 11 000 and 7 500 BC. The name of «Cueva de las Manos» stands for «Cave of Hands» in Spanish. It comes from its most famous images - numerous paintings of hands, left ones predominantly. The images of hands are negative painted or stencilled. There are also depictions of animals, such as guanacos (Lama guanicoe), rheas, still commonly found in the region, geometric shapes, zigzag patterns, representations of the sun and hunting scenes like naturalistic portrayals of a variety of hunting techniques, including the use of bolas.

1550 - 1200 BC

From 1550 to 1200 BC

Late Bronze Age. From the New Kingdom of Egypt establishment in c. 1550 BC to the Late Bronze Age collapse between 1200 and 1150 BC.