Chapter III


A Description of Hispaniola.
Also a Relation of the French Buccaneers.


THE large and rich island called Hispaniola is situate from 17 degrees to 19 degrees latitude; the circumference is 300 leagues; the extent from east to west 120; its breadth almost 50, being broader or narrower at certain places. This island was first discovered by Christopher Columbus, a.d. 1492; he being sent for this purpose by Ferdinand, king of Spain; from which time to this present the Spaniards have been continually possessors thereof. There are upon this island very good and strong cities, towns, and hamlets, as well as a great number of pleasant country houses and plantations, the effects of the care and industry of the Spaniards its inhabitants.

The chief city and metropolis hereof is Santo Domingo; being dedicated to St. Dominic, from whom it derives its name. It is situate towards the south, and affords a most excellent prospect; the country round about being embellished with innumerable rich plantations, as also verdant meadows and fruitful gardens; all which produce plenty and variety of excellent pleasant fruits, according to the nature of those countries. The governor of the island resides in this city, which is, as it were, the storehouse of all the cities, towns, and villages, which hence export and provide themselves with all necessaries for human life; and yet hath it this particularity above many other cities, that it entertains no commerce with any nation but its own, the Spaniards. The greatest part of the inhabitants are rich and substantial merchants or shopkeepers.

Another city of this island is San Jago, or St. James, being consecrated to that apostle. This is an open place, without walls or castle, situate in 19 deg. latitude. The inhabitants are generally hunters and planters, the adjacent territory and soil being very proper for the said exercises: the city is surrounded with large and delicious fields, as much pleasing to the view as those of Santo Domingo; and these abound with beasts both wild and tame, yielding vast numbers of skins and hides, very profitable to the owners.

In the south part of this island is another city, called Nuestra Sennora de Alta Gracia. This territory produces great quantities of cacao, whereof the inhabitants make great store of the richest chocolate. Here grows also ginger and tobacco, and much tallow is made of the beasts which are hereabouts hunted.

The inhabitants of this beautiful island of Hispaniola often resort in their canoes to the isle of Savona, not far distant, where is their chief fishery, especially of tortoises. Hither those fish constantly resort in great multitudes, at certain seasons, there to lay their eggs, burying them in the sands of the shoal, where, by the heat of the sun, which in those parts is very ardent, they are hatched. This island of Savona has little or nothing that is worthy consideration, being so very barren by reason of its sandy soil. True it is, that here grows some small quantity of lignum sanctum, or guaiacum, of whose use we say something in another place.

Westward of Santo Domingo is another great village called El Pueblo de Aso, or the town of Aso: the inhabitants thereof drive great traffic with those of another village, in the very middle of the island, and is called San Juan de Goave, or St. John of Goave. This is environed with a magnificent prospect of gardens, woods, and meadows. Its territory extends above twenty leagues in length, and grazes a great number of wild bulls and cows. In this village scarce dwell any others than hunters and butchers, who flay the beasts that are killed. These are for the most part a mongrel sort of people; some of which are born of white European people and negroes, and called mulattoes: others of Indians and white people, and termed mesticos: but others come of negroes and Indians, and are called alcatraces. From the said village are exported yearly vast quantities of tallow and hides, they exercising no other traffic: for as to the lands in this place, they are not cultivated, by reason of the excessive dryness of the soil. These are the chiefest places that the Spaniards possess in this island, from the Cape of Lobos towards St. John de Goave, unto the Cape of Samana nigh the sea, on the north side, and from the eastern part towards the sea, called Punta de Espada. All the rest of the island is possessed by the French, who are also planters and hunters.

This island hath very good ports for ships, from the Cape of Lobos to the Cape of Tiburon, on the west side thereof. In this space there are no less than four ports, exceeding in goodness, largeness, and security, even the very best of England. Besides these, from the Cape of Tiburon to the Cape of Donna Maria, there are two very excellent ports; and from this cape to the Cape of St. Nicholas, there are no less than twelve others. Every one of these ports hath also the confluence of two or three good rivers, in which are great plenty of several sorts of fish very pleasing to the palate. The country hereabouts is well watered with large and deep rivers and brooks, so that this part of the land may easily be cultivated without any great fear of droughts, because of these excellent streams. The sea-coasts and shores are also very pleasant, to which the tortoises resort in large numbers to lay their eggs.

This island was formerly very well peopled, on the north side, with many towns and villages; but these, being ruined by the Hollanders, were at last, for the greatest part, deserted by the Spaniards.

The spacious fields of this island commonly are five or six leagues in length, the beauty whereof is so pleasing to the eye, that, together with the great variety of their natural productions, they captivate the senses of the beholder. For here at once they not only with diversity of objects recreate the sight, but with many of the same do also please the smell, and with most contribute delights to the taste; also they flatter and excite the appetite, especially with the multitudes of oranges and lemons here growing, both sweet and sour, and those that participate of both tastes, and are only pleasantly tartish. Besides here abundantly grow several sorts of fruit, such are citrons, toronjas, and limas; in English not improperly called crab lemons.

Beside the fruit which this island produces, whose plenty, as is said, surpasses all the islands of America; it abounds also with all sorts of quadrupeds, as horses, bulls, cows, wild boars, and others, very useful to mankind, not only for food, but for cultivating the ground, and the management of commerce.

Here are vast numbers of wild dogs: these destroy yearly many cattle; for no sooner hath a cow calved, or a mare foaled, but these wild mastiffs devour the young, if they find not resistance from keepers and domestic dogs. They run up and down the woods and fields, commonly fifty, threescore, or more, together; being withal so fierce, that they will often assault an entire herd of wild boars, not ceasing to worry them till they have fetched down two or three. One day a French buccaneer showed me a strange action of this kind: being in the fields a-hunting together, we heard a great noise of dogs which has surrounded a wild boar: having tame dogs with us, we left them to the custody of our servants, being desirous to see the sport. Hence my companion and I climbed up two several trees, both for security and prospect. The wild boar, all alone, stood against a tree, defending himself with his tusks from a great number of dogs that enclosed him; killed with his teeth, and wounded several of them. This bloody fight continued about an hour; the wild boar, meanwhile, attempting many times to escape. At last flying, one dog, leaping upon his back, fastened on his throat. The rest of the dogs, perceiving the courage of their companion, fastened likewise on the boar, and presently killed him. This done, all of them, the first only excepted, laid themselves down upon the ground about the prey, and there peaceably continued, till he, the first and most courageous of the troop, had ate as much as he could: when this dog had left off, all the rest fell in to take their share, till nothing was left. What ought we to infer from this notable action, performed by wild animals, but this: that even beasts themselves are not destitute of knowledge, and that they give us documents how to honour such as have deserved well; even since these irrational animals did reverence and respect him that exposed his life to the greatest danger against the common enemy?

The governor of Tortuga, Monsieur Ogeron, finding that the wild dogs killed so many of the wild boars, that the hunters of that island had much ado to find any; fearing lest that common substance of the island should fail, sent for a great quantity of poison from France to destroy the wild mastiffs: this was done, a.d. 1668, by commanding horses to be killed, and empoisoned, and laid open at certain places where the wild dogs used to resort. This being continued for six months, there were killed an incredible number; and yet all this could not exterminate and destroy the race, or scarce diminish them; their number appearing almost as large as before. These wild dogs are easily tamed among men, even as tame as ordinary house dogs. The hunters of those parts, whenever they find a wild bitch with whelps, commonly take away the puppies, and bring them home; which being grown up, they hunt much better than other dogs.

But here the curious reader may perhaps inquire how so many wild dogs came here. The occasion was, the Spaniards having possessed these isles, found them peopled with Indians, a barbarous people, sensual and brutish, hating all labour, and only inclined to killing, and making war against their neighbours; not out of ambition, but only because they agreed not with themselves in some common terms of language; and perceiving the dominion of the Spaniards laid great restrictions upon their lazy and brutish customs, they conceived an irreconcilable hatred against them; but especially because they saw them take possession of their kingdoms and dominions. Hereupon, they made against them all the resistance they could, opposing everywhere their designs to the utmost: and the Spaniards finding themselves cruelly hated by the Indians, and nowhere secure from their treacheries, resolved to extirpate and ruin them, since they could neither tame them by civility, nor conquer them with the sword. But the Indians, it being their custom to make the woods their chief places of defence, at present made these their refuge, whenever they fled from the Spaniards. Hereupon, those first conquerors of the New World made use of dogs to range and search the intricatest thickets of woods and forests for those their implacable and unconquerable enemies: thus they forced them to leave their old refuge, and submit to the sword, seeing no milder usage would do it; hereupon they killed some of them, and quartering their bodies, placed them in the highways, that others might take warning from such a punishment; but this severity proved of ill consequence, for instead of fighting them and reducing them to civility, they conceived such horror of the Spaniards, that they resolved to detest and fly their sight for ever; hence the greatest part died in caves and subterraneous places of the woods and mountains, in which places I myself have often seen great numbers of human bones. The Spaniards finding no more Indians to appear about the woods, turned away a great number of dogs they had in their houses, and they finding no masters to keep them, betook themselves to the woods and fields to hunt for food to preserve their lives; thus by degrees they became unacquainted with houses, and grew wild. This is the truest account I can give of the multitudes of wild dogs in these parts.

But besides these wild mastiffs, here are also great numbers of wild horses everywhere all over the island: they are but low of stature, short bodied, with great heads, long necks, and big or thick legs: in a word, they have nothing handsome in their shape. They run up and down commonly in troops of two or three hundred together, one going always before to lead the multitude: when they meet any person travelling through the woods or fields, they stand still, suffering him to approach till he can almost touch them: and then suddenly starting, they betake themselves to flight, running away as fast as they can. The hunters catch them only for their skins, though sometimes they preserve their flesh likewise, which they harden with smoke, using it for provisions when they go to sea.

Here would be also wild bulls and cows in great number, if by continual hunting they were not much diminished; yet considerable profit is made to this day by such as make it their business to kill them. The wild bulls are of a vast bigness of body, and yet they hurt not any one except they be exasperated. Their hides are from eleven to thirteen feet long.

It is now time to speak of the French who inhabit great part of this island. We have already told how they came first into these parts: we shall now only describe their manner of living, customs, and ordinary employments. The callings or professions they follow are generally but three, either to hunt or plant, or else to rove the seas as pirates. It is a constant custom among them all, to seek out a comrade or companion, whom we may call partner in their fortunes, with whom they join the whole stock of what they possess towards a common gain. This is done by articles agreed to, and reciprocally signed. Some constitute their surviving companion absolute heir to what is left by the death of the first: others, if they be married, leave their estates to their wives and children; others, to other relations. This done, every one applies himself to his calling, which is always one of the three afore-mentioned.

The hunters are again subdivided into two sorts; for some of these only hunt wild bulls and cows, others only wild boars. The first of these are called bucaniers, and not long ago were about six hundred on this island, but now they are reckoned about three hundred. The cause has been the great decrease of wild cattle, which has been such, that, far from getting, they now are but poor in their trade. When the bucaniers go into the woods to hunt for wild bulls and cows, they commonly remain there a twelvemonth or two years, without returning home. After the hunt is over, and the spoil divided, they commonly sail to Tortuga, to provide themselves with guns, powder, and shot, and other necessaries for another expedition; the rest of their gains they spend prodigally, giving themselves to all manner of vices and debauchery, particularly to drunkenness, which they practise mostly with brandy: this they drink as liberally as the Spaniards do water. Sometimes they buy together a pipe of wine; this they stave at one end, and never cease drinking till it is out. Thus sottishly they live till they have no money left. The said bucaniers are very cruel and tyrannical to their servants, so that commonly they had rather be galley-slaves, or saw Brazil wood in the rasphouses of Holland, than serve such barbarous masters.

The second sort hunt nothing but wild boars; the flesh of these they salt, and sell it so to the planters. These hunters have the same vicious customs, and are as much addicted to debauchery as the former; but their manner of hunting is different from that in Europe; for these bucaniers have certain places designed for hunting, where they live for three or four months, and sometimes a whole year. Such places are called deza boulan; and in these, with only the company of five or six friends, they continue all the said time in mutual friendship. The first bucaniers many times agree with planters to furnish them with meat all the year at a certain price: the payment hereof is often made with two or three hundredweight of tobacco in the leaf; but the planters commonly into the bargain furnish them with a servant, whom they send to help. To the servant they afford sufficient necessaries for the purpose, especially of powder and shot to hunt withal.

The planters here have but very few slaves; for want of which, themselves and their servants are constrained to do all the drudgery. These servants commonly bind themselves to their masters for three years; but their masters, having no consciences, often traffic with their bodies, as with horses at a fair, selling them to other masters as they sell negroes. Yea, to advance this trade, some persons go purposely into France (and likewise to England, and other countries) to pick up young men or boys, whom they inveigle and transport; and having once got them into these islands, they work them like horses, the toil imposed on them being much harder than what they enjoin the negroes, their slaves; for these they endeavour to preserve, being their perpetual bondmen: but for their white servants, they care not whether they live or die, seeing they are to serve them no longer than three years. These miserable kidnapped people are frequently subject to a disease, which in these parts is called coma, being a total privation of their senses. This distemper is judged to proceed from their hard usage, and the change of their native climate; and there being often among these some of good quality, tender education, and soft constitutions, they are more easily seized with this disease, and others of those countries, than those of harder bodies, and laborious lives. Beside the hard usage in their diet, apparel, and rest, many times they beat them so cruelly, that they fall down dead under the hands of their cruel masters. This I have often seen with great grief. Of the many instances, I shall only give you the following history, it being remarkable in its circumstances.

A certain planter of these countries exercised such cruelty towards one of his servants, as caused him to run away. Having absconded, for some days, in the woods, at last he was taken, and brought back to the wicked Pharaoh. No sooner had he got him, but he commanded him to be tied to a tree; here he gave him so many lashes on his naked back, as made his body run with an entire stream of blood; then, to make the smart of his wounds the greater, he anointed him with lemon-juice, mixed with salt and pepper. In this miserable posture he left him tied to the tree for twenty-four hours, which being past, he began his punishment again, lashing him, as before, so cruelly, that the miserable wretch gave up the ghost, with these dying words: "I beseech the Almighty God, creator of heaven and earth, that he permit the wicked spirit to make thee feel as many torments before thy death, as thou hast caused me to feel before mine." A strange thing, and worthy of astonishment and admiration! Scarce three or four days were past, after this horrible fact, when the Almighty Judge, who had heard the cries of the tormented wretch, suffered the evil one suddenly to possess this barbarous and inhuman homicide, so that those cruel hands which had punished to death his innocent servant, were the tormentors of his own body: for he beat himself and tore his flesh, after a miserable manner, till he lost the very shape of a man; not ceasing to howl and cry, without any rest by day or night. Thus he continued raving mad, till he died. Many other examples of this kind I could rehearse; but these not belonging to our present discourse, I omit them.

The planters of the Caribbee islands are rather worse, and more cruel to their servants, than the former. In the isle of St. Christopher dwells one named Bettesa, well known to the Dutch merchants, who has killed above a hundred of his servants with blows and stripes. The English do the same with their servants; and the mildest cruelty they exercise towards them is, that when they have served six years of their time (they being bound among the English for seven) they use them so cruelly, as to force them to beg of their masters to sell them to others, though it be to begin another servitude of seven years, or at least three or four. And I have known many, who have thus served fifteen or twenty years, before they could obtain their freedom. Another law, very rigorous in that nation, is, if any man owes another above twenty-five shillings English, if he cannot pay it, he is liable to be sold for six or eight months. Not to trouble the reader any longer with relations of this kind, I shall now describe the famous actions and exploits of the greatest pirates of my time, during my residence in those parts: these I shall relate without the least passion or partiality, and assure my reader that I shall give him no stories upon trust, or hearsay, but only those enterprises to which I was myself an eye-witness.

Глава 7. Зимняя война балтийских подводных лодок (1939–1940 гг.) [154]

Короли подплава в море червонных валетов. Часть III. Обзор эволюции подводных сил СССР (1935-1941 гг.). Глава 7. Зимняя война балтийских подводных лодок (1939–1940 гг.)

30 ноября 1939 г. Советский Союз развязал войну против маленькой Финляндии, по численности населения не превосходившей Ленинграда. Вошедшие в зону войны Балтийский и Северный флоты приступили к выполнению поставленных перед ними боевых задач. Основные боевые действия флота развернулись на Балтийском морском театре, охватив среднюю часть Балтийского моря, Финский и Ботнический заливы. В войне приняли участие надводные корабли, подводные лодки, авиация, артиллерийские и стрелковые части береговой обороны флота. К войне с Финляндией Советский Союз стал готовиться заблаговременно, обвинив финское правительство в подготовке к нападению на СССР. Уже 3 ноября 1939 г. НК ВМФ флагман флота 2 ранга Н. Кузнецов директивой Военному совету БФ № 10254сс поставил задачу Балтийскому флоту (командующий флотом флагман 2 ранга [155] В. Трибуц, начальник штаба флота капитан 1 ранга Ю. Пантелеев) на ведение боевых действий. Согласно директиве приказано: — подводным лодкам найти и уничтожить броненосцы береговой обороны (ббо) Финляндии, не допустить их ухода в Швецию; — действиями подводных лодок и авиации у берегов Финляндии прекратить подвоз морем войск, боеприпасов и сырья; — в случае вступления или помощи Швеции действиями авиации, подводных лодок и легких сил воспрепятствовать шведскому флоту оказывать помощь Финляндии. Следует отметить невысокое качество самой подготовки к войне, основывавшейся на мизерных разведывательных данных о флоте и береговой обороне соседней Финляндии. «Разведка работала и продолжает еще работать плохо.

Великолепный часослов герцога Беррийского

Братья Лимбург. Великолепный часослов герцога Беррийского. Цикл Времена года. XV век.

«Великолепный часослов герцога Беррийского» или, в другой версии перевода, «Роскошный часослов герцога Беррийского» (фр. Très Riches Heures du Duc de Berry) - иллюстрированный манускрипт XV века. Самая известная часть изображений часослова, цикл «Времена года» состоит из 12 миниатюр с изображением соответствующих сезону деталей жизни на фоне замков. Создание рукописи началось в первой четверти XV века по заказу Жана, герцога Беррийского. Не была закончена при жизни заказчика и своих главных создателей, братьев Лимбург.

1991 - [ ... ]

From 1991 to the present day

From the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991 to the present day.

V. Гепеустовская волынка

Побег из ГУЛАГа. Часть 2. V. Гепеустовская волынка

При дневном свете городишко оказался еще меньше: если бы не мрачный дом ГПУ, все было бы мирно, сонно, местами даже красиво, особенно там, где виден изрезанный бухтами глубокий залив. Здесь говорится — губа. Но Север — безнадежный. Одни болота и граниты. Пришли в комендатуру: узкий коридорчик, дощатая переборка, в ней окошко, как на Шпалерке, в помещении для передач, только все меньше. За окошком сидит здоровенный детина — гепеуст... Рожа круглая, сытая, румяная, сам толстый и такой же нахальный, как все. — Как мне получить разрешение на свидание с таким-то? — называю ему фамилию, надеясь, что он скажет, что разрешение для него уже есть. — Стол свиданий, — отвечает он, ни о чем не справляясь. — Но муж писал мне, что хлопочет о свидании, может быть, разрешение уже есть. — Стол свиданий. Щелк, окошко захлопывается. Не у кого даже спросить, где этот «стол свиданий». Выходим на улицу. Кто-то проходит мимо, но все похожи на заключенных, а с ними разговаривать нельзя, еще наделаешь им беды... Идем в управление ГПУ. Не поймешь, куда войти. Наконец, попадается гепеуст. — Скажите, где стол свиданий? — Второй этаж, — буркнул он на ходу. — Как же туда попасть? — кричу ему вдогонку. Махнул рукой — за угол дома. Верно. Нашли вход в канцелярию; окошечко, надпись: «Стол свиданий». Очередь: две пожилые интеллигентки, баба с грудным ребенком, которого она держит под полушубком, и дама в котиковом манто.

Chapter XIX

The voyage of the Beagle. Chapter XIX. Australia

Sydney Excursion to Bathurst Aspect of the Woods Party of Natives Gradual Extinction of the Aborigines Infection generated by associated Men in health Blue Mountains View of the grand gulf-like Valleys Their origin and formation Bathurst, general civility of the Lower Orders State of Society Van Diemen's Land Hobart Town Aborigines all banished Mount Wellington King George's Sound Cheerless Aspect of the Country Bald Head, calcareous casts of branches of Trees Party of Natives Leave Australia JANUARY 12th, 1836.—Early in the morning a light air carried us towards the entrance of Port Jackson. Instead of beholding a verdant country, interspersed with fine houses, a straight line of yellowish cliff brought to our minds the coast of Patagonia. A solitary lighthouse, built of white stone, alone told us that we were near a great and populous city. Having entered the harbour, it appears fine and spacious, with cliff-formed shores of horizontally stratified sandstone. The nearly level country is covered with thin scrubby trees, bespeaking the curse of sterility. Proceeding further inland, the country improves: beautiful villas and nice cottages are here and there scattered along the beach. In the distance stone houses, two and three stories high, and windmills standing on the edge of a bank, pointed out to us the neighbourhood of the capital of Australia. At last we anchored within Sydney Cove. We found the little basin occupied by many large ships, and surrounded by warehouses.

VIII. Тоже Кемь

Побег из ГУЛАГа. Часть 2. VIII. Тоже Кемь

Дома, в той избе, которая нам дала приют и которую я вспомню с благодарностью в смертный час, я опять села на лавку у окна. Не умею передать того, что со мной делалось; каторга вызывала во мне большее возмущение, чем тюрьма. Все, что я видела, врезалось в душу, и хотелось узнать еще больше, до самой глубины горя и унижения, чтобы понять, где же конец. По улице погнали партию молодых еще, но до крайности истомленных людей. Лица их были серы, как бесплодная земля, голова, плечи, руки опущены, как под непомерной тяжестью, хотя за плечами у них были только жалкие, полупустые холщовые мешки. Кругом шли конвойные с карабинами наперевес. — На Белбалтлаг гонют, — вздохнула старуха, подсевшая ко мне на лавку. — Спаси, Господи, спаси и сохрани, и помилуй души наши, — говорила она, крестя их в окно мелкими крестиками. — Выживет ли кто? Каждый день гонют и гонют, а и казарм-то нету, струменту-то нету; землю, сказывут, деревянными лопатами роют, а морозец-то захватывает, как камень. Как мороз закрепчает, так и сами померзнут. Завидуют многие. Позавидуешь и смерти с жизни такой. — Скажи ты мне, бабонька, — обратилась она ко мне, — может, ты ученая какая, откуда така жизнь завелась? Я ничего не ответила. Что я могла сказать этой женщине, которая всю жизнь прошла честно, чисто, правдиво? — Не знаешь? — спросила она. — Нет. — То-то, не знаешь. Кого ни спрошу — никто не знает. Кабы знатье, может, и помог бы кто. Старухи бают, дьявол это путает, а смекаю — от людей это. Иной человек хуже нечистого.

От автора

Короли подплава в море червонных валетов. От автора

Книга продолжает изданную под названием «Рыцари глубин» хронику рождения и становления подводного плавания в России. Хронологические рамки повествования охватывают период с конца 1917 по июнь 1941 г. Материал основывается на сведениях, отобранных из фондов РГА ВМФ, ЦВМА, ЦВМБ, а также из газетных и журнальных статей. Первые три части книги характеризуют времена Гражданской войны, восстановления подводного плавания страны и его дальнейшего развития. Рассказывается о попытках утверждения новой военно-морской доктрины, строительстве подводных кораблей новых типов, подготовке подводников в условиях надвигающейся войны. Четвертая часть книги содержит краткие биографические сведения о первых советских командирах подводных лодок. Даже поверхностное знакомство с представленными сведениями позволит читателю понять, почему в 1941 г. страна оказалась не готовой в том числе и к войне на море. В Приложении читатель найдет необходимые справки. Каждому флоту отводятся отдельные главы. Приводимые в некоторых из них материалы и рассуждения, связанные с репрессиями в отношении моряков, с непримиримой борьбой моряков против армейцев за военно-морскую доктрину, которая соответствовала бы статусу военно-морской державы, с организацией и проведением боевой подготовки и с другими общефлотскими положениями, следует отнести ко всем флотам страны. [4] Автор выражает искреннюю благодарность старшим научным сотрудникам Российского государственного архива Военно-Морского флота Наталье Алексеевне Гоц и Центрального военно-морского архива Алле Андреевне Лучко, оказавшим неоценимую помощь в поиске и обработке необходимого материала.

Très Riches Heures du Duc de Berry

Limbourg brothers. Très Riches Heures du Duc de Berry. Delights and labours of the months. 15th century.

The «Très Riches Heures du Duc de Berry» is an illuminated manuscript created for John, Duke of Berry mostly in the first quarter of the 15th century by the Limbourg brothers. Although not finished before the death of both the customer and the artists. So later it was also worked on probably by Barthélemy d'Eyck. The manuscript was brought to its present state by Jean Colombe in 1485-1489. The most famous part of it is known as «Delights and labours of the months». It consists of 12 miniatures depicting months of the year and the corresponding everyday activities, most of them with castles in the background.

Chapter VI

The pirates of Panama or The buccaneers of America : Chapter VI

Of the origin of Francis Lolonois, and the beginning of his robberies. FRANCIS LOLONOIS was a native of that territory in France which is called Les Sables d'Olone, or The Sands of Olone. In his youth he was transported to the Caribbee islands, in quality of servant, or slave, according to custom; of which we have already spoken. Being out of his time, he came to Hispaniola; here he joined for some time with the hunters, before he began his robberies upon the Spaniards, which I shall now relate, till his unfortunate death. At first he made two or three voyages as a common mariner, wherein he behaved himself so courageously as to gain the favour of the governor of Tortuga, Monsieur de la Place; insomuch that he gave him a ship, in which he might seek his fortune, which was very favourable to him at first; for in a short time he got great riches. But his cruelties against the Spaniards were such, that the fame of them made him so well known through the Indies, that the Spaniards, in his time, would choose rather to die, or sink fighting, than surrender, knowing they should have no mercy at his hands. But Fortune, being seldom constant, after some time turned her back; for in a huge storm he lost his ship on the coast of Campechy. The men were all saved, but coming upon dry land, the Spaniards pursued them, and killed the greatest part, wounding also Lolonois.

3. Cудебно-медицинское исследование тел Юрия Дорошенко, Георгия Кривонищенко, Зинаиды Колмогоровой и Игоря Дятлова

Перевал Дятлова. Смерть, идущая по следу... 3. Cудебно-медицинское исследование тел Юрия Дорошенко, Георгия Кривонищенко, Зинаиды Колмогоровой и Игоря Дятлова

4 марта экспертом областного Бюро судебно-медицинской экспертизы Борисом Алексеевичем Возрождённым и судмедэкспертом города Североуральск Иваном Ивановичем Лаптевым было произведено исследование четырёх тел погибших туристов, доставленных в Ивдель. В целях правильной оценки обстоятельств случившегося на склоне Холат-Сяхыл, опишем одежду, в которой были доставлены погибшие туристы для анатомического исследования и основные телесные повреждения, отмеченные экспертами : а)Юрий Дорошенко, один из двух, найденных под кедром туристов. Известно, что это был самый крепкий и рослый (180 см.) член группы Дятлова. На нём была одета майка-безрукавка и штапельная (т.е. тонкого сукна, не фланелевая) рубашка-ковбойка с коротким рукавом; плавки, сатиновые трусы и трикотажные кальсоны. Все 6 пуговиц ковбойки были застёгнуты, оба нагрудных кармана - пусты. На ногах - разное количество носков: на левой - двое трикотажных и толстый шерстяной с обожжёным участком 2,0*5,0 см., а на правой - остатки х/б носка и шерстяной. Кальсоны Дорошенко были сильно разорваны: левая штанина в средней трети внутренней поверхности бедра имела разрыв размером 13,0*13,0 см., а правая штанина на передней поверхности бедра и того больше - 22,0*23,0 см. В волосах погибшего эксперт обнаружил частицы мха и хвою, кроме того, с правой стороны головы в её височной, теменной и затылочной частях оказались обожжены кончики волос. Цвет лица покойного был определён словосочетанием "буро-лиловый".

Глава 10

Борьба за Красный Петроград. Глава 10

Неустойчивость полевых частей Красной армии поставила в порядок дня принятие срочных энергичных мер по обороне Петрограда изнутри. В случае невозможности остановить рвущуюся вперед Северо-западную армию на подступах к Петрограду было решено дать бой в кварталах самого города. Поставленная советскому командованию задача, таким образом, состояла из двух основных частей: первая заключалась во всемерном укреплении частей 7-й армии и решении участи противника на фронте, вторая предусматривала необходимость мобилизации всех внутренних ресурсов крупного промышленного и политического центра и такой организации внутренней обороны его, которая должна была бы выполнить задачу по разгрому всех сил белогвардейской армии на улицах самого города. Укрепление подступов к Петрограду в виде фортификационных сооружений, производившееся в течение всего лета 1919 г., несколько затем усиленное к осени, в общем не дало положительных результатов, [329] так как отступавшие части 7-й армии не в состоянии были на них задержаться. Поэтому план внутренней обороны Петрограда предусматривал также и серьезные инженерные работы по укреплению районов города. Все эти ставшие на очередь чрезвычайной важности и срочности вопросы являлись заботой ранее созданного Военного совета (Комитета обороны) Петроградского укрепленного района. Деятельность Военного совета характеризуется тем количеством разнообразнейших вопросов, которые подлежали разрешению на заседаниях Совета.

1200 - 800 BC

From 1200 to 800 BC

From the Late Bronze Age collapse between 1200 and 1150 BC to the end of Greek Dark Ages c. 800 BC.