The translator to the reader (of 1684)

THE present Volume, both for its Curiosity and Ingenuity, I dare recommend unto the perusal of our English nation, whose glorious actions it containeth. What relateth unto the curiosity hereof, this Piece, both of Natural and Humane History, was no sooner published in the Dutch Original, than it was snatch't up for the most curious Library's of Holland; it was Translated into Spanish (two impressions thereof being sent into Spain in one year); it was taken notice of by the learned Academy of Paris; and finally recommended as worthy our esteem, by the ingenious Author of the Weekly Memorials for the Ingenious, printed here at London about two years ago. Neither all this undeservedly, seeing it enlargeth our acquaintance of Natural History, so much prized and enquir'd for, by the Learned of this present Age, with several observations not easily to be found in other accounts already received from America: and besides, it informeth us (with huge novelty) of as great and bold attempts, in point of Military conduct and valour, as ever were performed by mankind; without excepting, here, either Alexander the Great, or Julius Cæsar, or the rest of the Nine Worthy's of Fame. Of all which actions, as we cannot confess ourselves to have been ignorant hitherto (the very name of Bucaniers being, as yet, known but unto few of the Ingenious; as their Lives, Laws, and Conversation, are in a manner unto none) so can they not choose but be admired, out of this ingenuous Author, by whosoever is curious to learn the various revolutions of humane affairs. But, more especially by our English Nation; as unto whom these things more narrowly do appertain. We having here more than half the Book filled with the unparallel'd, if not inimitable, adventures and Heroick exploits of our own Country-men, and Relations; whose undaunted, and exemplary courage, when called upon by our King and Country, we ought to emulate.

From whence it hath proceeded, that nothing of this kind was ever, as yet, published in England, I cannot easily determine; except, as some will say, from some secret Ragion di Stato. Let the reason be as t'will; this is certain, so much the more we are obliged unto this present Author, who though a stranger unto our Nation, yet with that Candour and Fidelity hath recorded our Actions, as to render the Metal of our true English Valour to be the more believed and feared abroad, than if these things had been divulged by our selves at home. From hence peradventure will other Nations learn, that the English people are of their Genius more inclinable to act than to write; seeing as well they as we have lived unacquainted with these actions of our Nation, until such time as a Foreign Author to our Country came to tell them.

Besides the merits of this Piece for its curiosity, another point of no less esteem, is the truth and sincerity wherewith everything seemeth to be penned. No greater ornament or dignity can be added unto History, either humane or natural, than truth. All other embellishments, if this be failing, are of little or no esteem; if this be delivered, are either needless or superfluous. What concerneth this requisite in our Author, his lines do everywhere declare the faithfulness and sincerity of his mind. He writeth not by hearsay, but was an eye witness, as he somewhere telleth you, unto all and every one of the bold and hazardous attempts which he relateth. And these he delivereth with such candour of stile, such ingenuity of mind, such plainness of words, such conciseness of periods, so much divested of Rhetorical Hyperboles, or the least flourishes of Eloquence, so hugely void of Passion or national Reflections, as that he strongly perswadeth all-along to the credit of what he saith; yea, raiseth the mind of the Reader to believe these things far greater than what he hath said; and having read him, leaveth onely this scruple or concern behind, that you can read him no longer. In a word, such are his deserts, that some persons peradventure would not stickle to compare him to the Father of Historians, Philip de Comines; at least thus much may be said, with all truth imaginable, that he resembleth that great Author in many of his excellent qualities.

I know some persons have objected against the greatness of these prodigious Adventures, intimating that the resistance our Bucaniers found in America, was everywhere but small. For the Spaniards, say they, in the West Indies, are become of late years nothing less, but rather much more degenerate than in Europe. The continual Peace they have enjoyed in those parts, the defect of Military Discipline, and European souldiers for their Commanders, much contributing hereunto. But more especially, and above all other reasons, the very luxury of the Soil and Riches, the extreme heat of those Countries, and influence of the Stars being such, as totally inclineth their bodies unto an infinite effeminacy and cowardize of minds.

Unto these Reasons I shall only answer in brief. This History will convince them to be manifestly false. For as to the continual Peace here alleadged, we know that no Peace could ever be established beyond the Line, since the first possession of the West-Indies by the Spaniards, till the burning of Panama. At that time, or few months before, Sir William Godolphin by his prudent negotiation in quality of Embassadour for our most Gracious Monarch, did conclude at Madrid a peace to be observed even beyond the Line, and through the whole extent of the Spanish Dominions in the West-Indies. This transaction gave the Spaniards new causes of complaints against our proceedings, that no sooner a Peace had been established for those parts of America, but our forces had taken and burnt both Chagre, St. Catherine, and Panama. But our reply was convincing, That whereas eight or ten months of time had been allowed by Articles for the publishing of the said Peace through all the Dominions of both Monarchies in America, those Hostilities had been committed, not onely without orders from his Majesty of England, but also within the space of the said eight or ten months of time. Until that time the Spanish Inhabitants of America being, as it were, in a perpetual War with Europe, certain it is that no Coasts nor Kingdoms in the World have been more frequently infested nor alarm'd with the invasions of several Nations than theirs. Thus from the very beginning of their Conquests in America, both English, French, Dutch Portuguese, Swedes, Danes, Curlanders, and all other nations that navigate the Ocean, have frequented the West-Indies, and filled them with their robberies and Assaults. From these occasions have they been in continual watch and ward, and kept their Militia in constant exercise, as also their Garrisons pretty well provided and paid; as fearing every sail they discovered at Sea, to be Pirats of one Nation or another. But much more especially, since that Curasao, Tortuga, and Jamaica have been inhabited by English, French, and Dutch, and bred up that race of Hunts-men, than which, no other ever was more desperate, nor more mortal enemies to the Spaniards, called Bucaniers. Now shall we say, that these People, through too long continuation of Peace, have utterly abolished the exercises of War, having been all-along incessantly vexed with the Tumults and Alarms thereof?

In like manner is it false, to accuse their defect of Military Discipline for want of European Commanders. For who knoweth not that all places, both Military and Civil, through those vast dominions of the West-Indies, are provided out of Spain? And those of the Militia most commonly given unto expert Commanders, trained up from their infancy in the Wars of Europe, either in Africa, Milan, Sicily, Naples, or Flanders, fighting against either English, French, Dutch, Portuguese, or Moors? Yea their very Garrisons, if you search them in those parts, will peradventure be found to be stock'd three parts to four with Souldiers both born and bred in the Kingdom of Spain.

From these Considerations it may be inferr'd what little difference ought to be allowed betwixt the Spanish Souldiers, Inhabitants of the West-Indies, and those of Europe. And how little the Soil or Climate hath influenced or caused their Courage to degenerate towards cowardize or baseness of mind. As if the very same Argument, deduced from the nature of that Climate, did not equally militate against the valour of our famous Bucaniers, and represent this to be of as degenerate Metal as theirs.

But nothing can be more clearly evinced, than is the Valour of the American Spaniards, either Souldiers or Officers, by the sequel of this History. What men ever fought more desperately than the Garrison of Chagre? Their number being 314, and of all these, only thirty remaining; of which number scarce ten were unwounded; and among them, not one officer found alive? Were not 600 killed upon the spot at Panama, 500 at Gibraltar, almost as many more at Puerto del Principe, all dying with their Arms in their hands, and facing bravely the Enemy for the defence of their Country and private Concerns? Did not those of the Town of San Pedro both fortifie themselves, lay several Ambuscades, and lastly sell their lives as dear as any European Souldier could do; Lolonois being forced to gain step by step his advance unto the Town, with huge loss both of bloud and men? Many other instances might be produced out of this compendious Volume, of the generous resistance the Spaniards made in several places, though Fortune favoured not their Arms.

Next, as to the personal Valour of many of their Commanders, What man ever behaved himself more briskly than the Governour of Gibraltar, than the Governour of Puerto del Principe, both dying for the defence of their Towns; than Don Alonso del Campo, and others? Or what examples can easily parallel the desperate courage of the Governour of Chagre? who, though the Palizda's were fired, the Terraplens were sunk into the Ditch, the Breaches were entred, the Houses all burnt above him, the whole Castle taken, his men all killed; yet would not admit of any quarter, but chose rather to die under his Arms, being shot into the brain, than surrender himself as a Prisoner unto the Bucaniers. What lion ever fought to the last gasp more obstinately than the Governour of Puerto Velo? who, seeing the Town enter'd by surprizal in the night, one chief Castle blown up into the Air, all the other Forts and Castles taken, his own assaulted several ways, both Religious men and women placed at the front of the Enemy to fix the Ladders against the Walls; yet spared not to kill as many of the said Religious persons as he could. And at last, the walls being scaled, the Castle enter'd and taken, all his own men overcome by fire and sword, who had cast down their Arms, and begged mercy from the Enemy; yet would admit of none for his own life. Yet, with his own hands killed several of his Souldiers, to force them to stand to their Arms, though all were lost. Yea, though his own Wife and Daughter begged of him upon their knees that he would have his life by craving quarter, though the Enemy desired of him the same thing; yet would hearken to no cries nor perswasions, but they were forced to kill him, combating with his Arms in his hands, being not otherwise able to take him Prisoner, as they were desirous to do. Shall these men be said to be influenced with Cowardize, who thus acted to the very last Scene of their own Tragedies? Or shall we rather say that they wanted no Courage, but Fortune? It being certainly true, that he who is killed in a Batel, may be equally couragious with him that killeth. And that whosoever derogateth from the Valour of the Spaniards in the West-Indies, diminisheth in like manner the Courage of the Bucaniers, his own Country-men, who have seemed to act beyond mortal men in America.

Now, to say something concerning John Esquemeling, the first Author of this History. I take him to be a Dutch-man, or at least born in Flanders, notwithstanding that the Spanish Translation representeth him to be a Native of the Kingdom of France. His printing this History originally in Dutch, which doubtless must be his native Tongue, who otherwise was but an illiterate man, together with the very sound of his name, convincing me thereunto. True it is, he set sail from France, and was some years at Tortuga; but neither of these two Arguments, drawn from the History, are prevalent. For were he to be a French-man born, how came he to learn the Dutch language so perfectly as to prefer it to his own? Especially that not being spoken at Tortuga nor Jamaica, where he resided all the while.

I hope I have made this English Translation something more plain and correct than the Spanish. Some few notorious faults either of the Printer or the Interpreter, I am sure I have redressed. But the Spanish Translator complaining much of the intricacy of Stile in the Original (as flowing from a person who, as hath been said, was no Scholar) as he was pardonable, being in great haste, for not rendring his own Version so distinct and elaborate as he could desire; so must I be excused from the one, that is to say, Elegancy, if I have cautiously declined the other, I mean Confusion.

7. «Ком-баре»

Записки «вредителя». Часть I. Время террора. 7. «Ком-баре»

К этим начальническим фигурам примыкали коммунисты и комсомольцы, занимавшие меньшие должности. Большинство их были на так называемой «общественной» работе как члены месткомов, фабкомов и прочих полагающихся комитетов; они же заполняли канцелярию и сидели у теплых мест — в кооперативе, складах, отделе снабжения. На производстве бывали единицы, но в таком случае при них неизменно находился беспартийный заместитель, несущий ответственность. В море они не работали как большевики, не стремились коммунизировать состав капитанов. Если какого-нибудь коммуниста и заставляли поступить на траулер, он оттуда сбегал при первой возможности. Все эти люди были пришлые, многие с уголовной практикой, которую они не всегда забывали, а иногда и успешно применяли в тресте. Они критиковали работу других совершенно ее не зная, занимались изданием «стенгазеты» и писанием в ней пасквилей, «проведением очередных кампаний по займам, политграмоте, текущей политике», но реальной работы не делали.

6. Вывод за ворота

Записки «вредителя». Часть III. Концлагерь. 6. Вывод за ворота

Очередь под открытым небом, то есть большую часть года под дождем и снежной метелью. Многие проглатывают свою порцию тут же, стоя, другие бегут в барак, на нары. У кого есть чайник, берут кипяток. Но все торопятся, потому что надо исполнить длинную и сложную процедуру, чтобы получить право выйти за проволоку и успеть на работу. В бараке, у ротного, надо получить «рабочую книжку», расписаться в книге, отметить часы и минуты получения, затем в канцелярии дежурного по лагерю надо показать книжку и получить пропуск на выход за проволоку. Получивших пропуска конвойные выстраивают на «линейке» и ведут к воротам. Здесь часовой просчитывает заключенных, проверяет пропуска. Вывод из ворот происходит в восемь часов утра, к девяти все должны быть разведены по всем учреждениям лагеря, разбросанным по городу Кеми. Так как всем надо «выправить документы» одновременно — всюду толкотня, очереди, ругань Нас гонят на принудительную работу, и мы же должны добыть себе пропуска, а нас же ругают в течение всей этой процедуры... Ведут нас посреди дороги, осенью и весной покрытой невылазной грязью. Среди конвойных попадаются рьяные служаки, которые требуют, чтобы мы строго соблюдали военный строй, а обуты мы все бог знает как, и многие месят эту каторжную грязь уже из последних сил. — Равняться чище в рядах! — кричит наш командир, останавливая и равняя шеренги. — До вечера стоять будете. — А нам что, постоим! — слышится из рядов. — Срок идет. Конвойный бросается искать виновных, отбирает пять-шесть документов, записывает фамилии.

1200 г. до н.э. - 800 г. до н.э.

C 1200 г. до н.э. по 800 г. до н.э.

От Катастрофы Бронзового века между 1200 г. до н.э. и 1150 г. до н.э. до конца древнегреческих Темных веков примерно в 800 г. до н.э.

II. На отлете

Побег из ГУЛАГа. Часть 3. II. На отлете

Странное чувство: я собираюсь в отчаянный побег, и стоит кому-нибудь заподозрить меня в этом, расстрел обеспечен и мне, и мужу, — но вместе с тем страдаю от невозможности взглянуть последний раз на то, что остается. Ни на что не хватает времени, сердце заходится от печали: я же расстаюсь со всем, со всеми! Я не успеваю опомниться, и вот мы с сыном уже в поезде и едем увы, знакомой дорогой. По-прежнему у насыпи заключенные копают землю, едут на свидания жены, конфузливо сторонясь других пассажиров. Но я теперь не чувствую себя повязанной с ними одной участью. Я еду не на свидание, а гораздо дальше. Мы с сыном попадаем в компанию студентов, которых послали из лесного техникума нарядчиками и десятниками на лесозаготовки. Настроение у них не очень веселое, и мне еще приходится их утешать. Сапоги выдали не всем, — как по лесу ходить в поношенных штиблетах — неизвестно. Накомарников нет совсем. Сказали, что все выдадут на месте работы, но кто этому поверит? Не ехать было нельзя, потому что лесной техникум на общем собрании вызвался послать студентов на лесозаготовки. Приняли постановление общим криком, а потом уже по разверстке определяли, кого куда. В светлую полярную ночь не спится: душно, жарко, из окон засыпает песком и паровозной сажей. — Ты чего не дрыхнешь? — перешептываются двое студентов на верхних полках. — Помнишь, Мишку убили в прошлом году? — Не в этих местах. Под Архангельском. — Тоже на лесозаготовках. — Случай. — Невеселый! — Ясно. Лесорубам не веселее нашего.

Оглавление

Карта материалов на Русском и других языках, использующих Кириллицу

Глава 26

Сквозь ад русской революции. Воспоминания гардемарина. 1914–1919. Глава 26

Вскоре после отступления Генштаб реорганизовал армию. Были проведены перестановки в командном составе, слияния дивизий и полков, созданы новые воинские части. Во многом претерпел изменения и весь личный состав. Я не удивился, когда получил приказ о переводе с бронепоезда во вновь формируемый танковый батальон. Расставание с приятелями-офицерами и командой бронепоезда, конечно, опечалило, но перспектива службы в танковом подразделении казалась заманчивой. В моем случае на перевод в другую воинскую часть повлияли два фактора: во-первых, желание моих флотских друзей, уже находящихся при танках, чтобы я проходил службу вместе с ними; во-вторых, мое знание английского языка на рабочем уровне. Три больших тяжелых танка и два легких представляли собой весомый вклад союзников в Северо-западную армию. Будучи новейшим вооружением, еще не использовавшимся в России, танки прибыли в сопровождении 40 британских офицеров и солдат. Идея состояла в том, что, пока русские не научатся управлять машинами, их экипажи будут формироваться наполовину из англичан. Формирование такого подразделения – сложная проблема, но отношения между русскими и англичанами изначально отличались дружелюбием, уже после первой недели между ними возникла взаимная искренняя симпатия. Большей частью это было заслугой полковника из Южной Африки и русского флотского капитана. Оба олицетворяли лучшие качества боевого офицерства своих стран. Русские отдавали должное мотивам, которые побудили британских офицеров добровольно включиться в борьбу с большевиками, англичане, в свою очередь, относились к русским чутко и тактично.

Глава 8

Сквозь ад русской революции. Воспоминания гардемарина. 1914–1919. Глава 8

Через две-три недели после отречения царя первая волна энтузиазма спала. Одни люди, увлеченные первыми успехами революции, начали спускаться на землю. Другие, которые просто удивлялись ей, вернулись к прерванным занятиям и пытались приспособиться к новым условиям. Снова стал вращаться маховик промышленности, заработал государственный механизм, жизнь входила в свою колею. Но, несмотря на внешнее успокоение, не хватало чего-то существенного и важного. В воздухе витала неопределенность. Временное правительство приступило к выполнению своих функций с намерением разумно править в разумной стране и решительно подобрать разорванные концы нити там, где их бросил старый режим. Однако новая власть плохо представляла себе природу вооруженного восстания, никто не сознавал в ней потенциальных опасностей и грандиозности задач. Если бы некоторые из правителей обладали даром предвидения того, что произойдет, они бы не стремились возбуждать общественное мнение до опасного уровня. Большинство населения было так поглощено открывающимися перспективами, что считало революцию благом. Внезапность переворота заставляла каждого остро воспринимать то, что происходит вокруг него, но оставаться совершенно равнодушным к всеобщему хаосу. Каждый день рождал новые дилеммы: инфантильные представления о свободе вступали в конфликт с чувством ответственности, высокие принципы сталкивались с неприкрытым эгоизмом, интеллект предпринимал тщетные попытки найти почву для взаимопонимания с глупостью. В России наступило время перебранки. Нигде конфронтация не приняла таких масштабов, как в Петрограде.

20. В «Кресты»

Записки «вредителя». Часть II. Тюрьма. 20. В «Кресты»

Утром 25 января 1931 года узнали, что пятьсот человек назначены в «Кресты». ГПУ получило там в свое ведение второй корпус, до этого времени занятый уголовными. Началась всеобщая сумятица. Многие, особенно старожилы, сильно приуныли: при переводе они теряли все свои преимущества. Кроме того, мы все горевали, предвидя потерю всех мелких, но драгоценных для нас вещей: иголки, обрывки веревочек, самодельные ножи — все это должно было пропасть при обыске во время перевода. Беспорядок и суматоха, поднятые начальством, требовавшим мгновенного исполнения приказов, были удручающими. Часами стояли мы в камере для обыска, чтобы подвергнуться этой унизительной процедуре: часами нас проверяли, записывали, считали и пересчитывали, часами ждали мы «черного ворона», который, переполненный до отказа, перевозил нас партиями на другую сторону Невы, в «Кресты». Ожидающих перевозки, уже обысканных, просчитанных и записанных, охраняла уже не тюремная стража, которой не хватало, а простые солдаты из войск ГПУ. Конвойные с любопытством оглядывали нас, крадучись вступали в беседу. — За что, товарищ, сидишь? — Кто его знает, сам не знаю, — был обычный ответ. — Вот, поди ты, все вот так. За что только народ в тюрьмах держат! Воры те свободно по улицам ходят, а хороших людей — по тюрьмам держат. — Тише ты, — останавливал его другой конвойный, — видишь, шпик, — кивнул он головой на подходившего тюремного надзирателя. Дошла и моя очередь. Втиснули в набитый до отказа тюремный фургон, так что последних приминали дверцами; помчали.

Middle Paleolithic

Middle Paleolithic : from 300 000 to 50 000 years before present

Middle Paleolithic : from 300 000 to 50 000 years before present.

Глава 10. Обновление Черноморского подплава [212]

Глава 10. Обновление Черноморского подплава [212]

В январе 1930 г. подводные лодки Отдельного дивизиона приступили к отработке взаимодействия с авиацией флота. 25 января пл «АГ-23» (Воеводин) и «АГ-24» (Сластников) выполняли тактическое упражнение: «наведение подводных лодок самолетами для атаки крейсера». После занятия лодками своих позиций где-то в районе западнее мыса Херсонес, с евпаторийского рейда в море вышел кр «Коминтерн», а из района Кача вылетели два самолета. Подлетая к району Евпатории, самолеты тут же обнаружили крейсер, так как деваться ему было некуда, но передать радиодонесение им не пришлось, поскольку на два самолета оказалась только одна радиостанция, у которой в то время, как назло, в радиопередатчике сгорела генераторная лампа. Моряки в таких случаях идут на сближение до дистанции голосовой связи, у авиаторов же такой номер [213] не пройдет, потому что они высоко и под шум мотора до парохода не докричишься. Но они имели другое средство контактной связи. И тогда один самолет, оставшись в районе обнаружения крейсера, продолжал следить за ним, а другой полетел к лодкам, чтобы передать им информацию «из рук в руки». В те времена для этого использовался вымпел, представлявший собой капсулу, в которую заключалось написанное на бумаге донесение и к которой крепился длинный матерчатый «хвост» яркой расцветки. Подлетая к адресату, аэроплан снижался, и летчик-наблюдатель сбрасывал вымпел, стараясь, чтобы он попал на палубу корабля. Подлетев к одной из лодок, самолет сбросил вымпел, который упал рядом с лодкой в воду. А когда его поймали за «хвост», то он оторвался, а капсула с донесением пропала в черноморских волнах.

1559 - 1603

С 1559 по 1603 год

С конца Итальянских войн в 1559 до смерти Елизаветы I Английской в 1603.

Список схем

Короли подплава в море червонных валетов. Список иллюстраций. Список схем