The translator to the reader (of 1684)

THE present Volume, both for its Curiosity and Ingenuity, I dare recommend unto the perusal of our English nation, whose glorious actions it containeth. What relateth unto the curiosity hereof, this Piece, both of Natural and Humane History, was no sooner published in the Dutch Original, than it was snatch't up for the most curious Library's of Holland; it was Translated into Spanish (two impressions thereof being sent into Spain in one year); it was taken notice of by the learned Academy of Paris; and finally recommended as worthy our esteem, by the ingenious Author of the Weekly Memorials for the Ingenious, printed here at London about two years ago. Neither all this undeservedly, seeing it enlargeth our acquaintance of Natural History, so much prized and enquir'd for, by the Learned of this present Age, with several observations not easily to be found in other accounts already received from America: and besides, it informeth us (with huge novelty) of as great and bold attempts, in point of Military conduct and valour, as ever were performed by mankind; without excepting, here, either Alexander the Great, or Julius Cæsar, or the rest of the Nine Worthy's of Fame. Of all which actions, as we cannot confess ourselves to have been ignorant hitherto (the very name of Bucaniers being, as yet, known but unto few of the Ingenious; as their Lives, Laws, and Conversation, are in a manner unto none) so can they not choose but be admired, out of this ingenuous Author, by whosoever is curious to learn the various revolutions of humane affairs. But, more especially by our English Nation; as unto whom these things more narrowly do appertain. We having here more than half the Book filled with the unparallel'd, if not inimitable, adventures and Heroick exploits of our own Country-men, and Relations; whose undaunted, and exemplary courage, when called upon by our King and Country, we ought to emulate.

From whence it hath proceeded, that nothing of this kind was ever, as yet, published in England, I cannot easily determine; except, as some will say, from some secret Ragion di Stato. Let the reason be as t'will; this is certain, so much the more we are obliged unto this present Author, who though a stranger unto our Nation, yet with that Candour and Fidelity hath recorded our Actions, as to render the Metal of our true English Valour to be the more believed and feared abroad, than if these things had been divulged by our selves at home. From hence peradventure will other Nations learn, that the English people are of their Genius more inclinable to act than to write; seeing as well they as we have lived unacquainted with these actions of our Nation, until such time as a Foreign Author to our Country came to tell them.

Besides the merits of this Piece for its curiosity, another point of no less esteem, is the truth and sincerity wherewith everything seemeth to be penned. No greater ornament or dignity can be added unto History, either humane or natural, than truth. All other embellishments, if this be failing, are of little or no esteem; if this be delivered, are either needless or superfluous. What concerneth this requisite in our Author, his lines do everywhere declare the faithfulness and sincerity of his mind. He writeth not by hearsay, but was an eye witness, as he somewhere telleth you, unto all and every one of the bold and hazardous attempts which he relateth. And these he delivereth with such candour of stile, such ingenuity of mind, such plainness of words, such conciseness of periods, so much divested of Rhetorical Hyperboles, or the least flourishes of Eloquence, so hugely void of Passion or national Reflections, as that he strongly perswadeth all-along to the credit of what he saith; yea, raiseth the mind of the Reader to believe these things far greater than what he hath said; and having read him, leaveth onely this scruple or concern behind, that you can read him no longer. In a word, such are his deserts, that some persons peradventure would not stickle to compare him to the Father of Historians, Philip de Comines; at least thus much may be said, with all truth imaginable, that he resembleth that great Author in many of his excellent qualities.

I know some persons have objected against the greatness of these prodigious Adventures, intimating that the resistance our Bucaniers found in America, was everywhere but small. For the Spaniards, say they, in the West Indies, are become of late years nothing less, but rather much more degenerate than in Europe. The continual Peace they have enjoyed in those parts, the defect of Military Discipline, and European souldiers for their Commanders, much contributing hereunto. But more especially, and above all other reasons, the very luxury of the Soil and Riches, the extreme heat of those Countries, and influence of the Stars being such, as totally inclineth their bodies unto an infinite effeminacy and cowardize of minds.

Unto these Reasons I shall only answer in brief. This History will convince them to be manifestly false. For as to the continual Peace here alleadged, we know that no Peace could ever be established beyond the Line, since the first possession of the West-Indies by the Spaniards, till the burning of Panama. At that time, or few months before, Sir William Godolphin by his prudent negotiation in quality of Embassadour for our most Gracious Monarch, did conclude at Madrid a peace to be observed even beyond the Line, and through the whole extent of the Spanish Dominions in the West-Indies. This transaction gave the Spaniards new causes of complaints against our proceedings, that no sooner a Peace had been established for those parts of America, but our forces had taken and burnt both Chagre, St. Catherine, and Panama. But our reply was convincing, That whereas eight or ten months of time had been allowed by Articles for the publishing of the said Peace through all the Dominions of both Monarchies in America, those Hostilities had been committed, not onely without orders from his Majesty of England, but also within the space of the said eight or ten months of time. Until that time the Spanish Inhabitants of America being, as it were, in a perpetual War with Europe, certain it is that no Coasts nor Kingdoms in the World have been more frequently infested nor alarm'd with the invasions of several Nations than theirs. Thus from the very beginning of their Conquests in America, both English, French, Dutch Portuguese, Swedes, Danes, Curlanders, and all other nations that navigate the Ocean, have frequented the West-Indies, and filled them with their robberies and Assaults. From these occasions have they been in continual watch and ward, and kept their Militia in constant exercise, as also their Garrisons pretty well provided and paid; as fearing every sail they discovered at Sea, to be Pirats of one Nation or another. But much more especially, since that Curasao, Tortuga, and Jamaica have been inhabited by English, French, and Dutch, and bred up that race of Hunts-men, than which, no other ever was more desperate, nor more mortal enemies to the Spaniards, called Bucaniers. Now shall we say, that these People, through too long continuation of Peace, have utterly abolished the exercises of War, having been all-along incessantly vexed with the Tumults and Alarms thereof?

In like manner is it false, to accuse their defect of Military Discipline for want of European Commanders. For who knoweth not that all places, both Military and Civil, through those vast dominions of the West-Indies, are provided out of Spain? And those of the Militia most commonly given unto expert Commanders, trained up from their infancy in the Wars of Europe, either in Africa, Milan, Sicily, Naples, or Flanders, fighting against either English, French, Dutch, Portuguese, or Moors? Yea their very Garrisons, if you search them in those parts, will peradventure be found to be stock'd three parts to four with Souldiers both born and bred in the Kingdom of Spain.

From these Considerations it may be inferr'd what little difference ought to be allowed betwixt the Spanish Souldiers, Inhabitants of the West-Indies, and those of Europe. And how little the Soil or Climate hath influenced or caused their Courage to degenerate towards cowardize or baseness of mind. As if the very same Argument, deduced from the nature of that Climate, did not equally militate against the valour of our famous Bucaniers, and represent this to be of as degenerate Metal as theirs.

But nothing can be more clearly evinced, than is the Valour of the American Spaniards, either Souldiers or Officers, by the sequel of this History. What men ever fought more desperately than the Garrison of Chagre? Their number being 314, and of all these, only thirty remaining; of which number scarce ten were unwounded; and among them, not one officer found alive? Were not 600 killed upon the spot at Panama, 500 at Gibraltar, almost as many more at Puerto del Principe, all dying with their Arms in their hands, and facing bravely the Enemy for the defence of their Country and private Concerns? Did not those of the Town of San Pedro both fortifie themselves, lay several Ambuscades, and lastly sell their lives as dear as any European Souldier could do; Lolonois being forced to gain step by step his advance unto the Town, with huge loss both of bloud and men? Many other instances might be produced out of this compendious Volume, of the generous resistance the Spaniards made in several places, though Fortune favoured not their Arms.

Next, as to the personal Valour of many of their Commanders, What man ever behaved himself more briskly than the Governour of Gibraltar, than the Governour of Puerto del Principe, both dying for the defence of their Towns; than Don Alonso del Campo, and others? Or what examples can easily parallel the desperate courage of the Governour of Chagre? who, though the Palizda's were fired, the Terraplens were sunk into the Ditch, the Breaches were entred, the Houses all burnt above him, the whole Castle taken, his men all killed; yet would not admit of any quarter, but chose rather to die under his Arms, being shot into the brain, than surrender himself as a Prisoner unto the Bucaniers. What lion ever fought to the last gasp more obstinately than the Governour of Puerto Velo? who, seeing the Town enter'd by surprizal in the night, one chief Castle blown up into the Air, all the other Forts and Castles taken, his own assaulted several ways, both Religious men and women placed at the front of the Enemy to fix the Ladders against the Walls; yet spared not to kill as many of the said Religious persons as he could. And at last, the walls being scaled, the Castle enter'd and taken, all his own men overcome by fire and sword, who had cast down their Arms, and begged mercy from the Enemy; yet would admit of none for his own life. Yet, with his own hands killed several of his Souldiers, to force them to stand to their Arms, though all were lost. Yea, though his own Wife and Daughter begged of him upon their knees that he would have his life by craving quarter, though the Enemy desired of him the same thing; yet would hearken to no cries nor perswasions, but they were forced to kill him, combating with his Arms in his hands, being not otherwise able to take him Prisoner, as they were desirous to do. Shall these men be said to be influenced with Cowardize, who thus acted to the very last Scene of their own Tragedies? Or shall we rather say that they wanted no Courage, but Fortune? It being certainly true, that he who is killed in a Batel, may be equally couragious with him that killeth. And that whosoever derogateth from the Valour of the Spaniards in the West-Indies, diminisheth in like manner the Courage of the Bucaniers, his own Country-men, who have seemed to act beyond mortal men in America.

Now, to say something concerning John Esquemeling, the first Author of this History. I take him to be a Dutch-man, or at least born in Flanders, notwithstanding that the Spanish Translation representeth him to be a Native of the Kingdom of France. His printing this History originally in Dutch, which doubtless must be his native Tongue, who otherwise was but an illiterate man, together with the very sound of his name, convincing me thereunto. True it is, he set sail from France, and was some years at Tortuga; but neither of these two Arguments, drawn from the History, are prevalent. For were he to be a French-man born, how came he to learn the Dutch language so perfectly as to prefer it to his own? Especially that not being spoken at Tortuga nor Jamaica, where he resided all the while.

I hope I have made this English Translation something more plain and correct than the Spanish. Some few notorious faults either of the Printer or the Interpreter, I am sure I have redressed. But the Spanish Translator complaining much of the intricacy of Stile in the Original (as flowing from a person who, as hath been said, was no Scholar) as he was pardonable, being in great haste, for not rendring his own Version so distinct and elaborate as he could desire; so must I be excused from the one, that is to say, Elegancy, if I have cautiously declined the other, I mean Confusion.

1603 - 1648

С 1603 по 1648 год

От смерти Елизаветы I Английской в 1603 до Вестфальского мира и конца Тридцатилетней войны в 1648.

Глава 1

Сквозь ад русской революции. Воспоминания гардемарина. 1914–1919. Глава 1

Если бы кто-нибудь сегодня сказал мне, что через 20 лет я больше не буду американцем, что каждому городу и селению этой страны суждено пережить войну и голод, что жизнь всех моих друзей будет выбита из привычной колеи и большинство из них погибнет насильственной смертью, а сам я окажусь в отдаленном уголке мира, навсегда оторванный от своей семьи, – если кто-нибудь сказал бы мне все это, я счел бы такого человека безумцем и категорически отверг столь мрачные прогнозы. Возможно, позднее, уединившись и дав волю воображению, впал бы в томительное беспокойство. Я вспомнил бы, что не так давно считал подобное предсказание смехотворным и абсурдным, однако оно полностью оправдалось. Даже самое невероятное кажется возможным теперь, когда я начал чувствовать пропасть, разделяющую мое восприятие жизни прежде и сейчас. Внутренне я изменился: иным стало мое отношение к понятию «национальное», у меня другие привязанности и устремления. Только память связывает того, кем я был, с тем, каким я стал, – непрочная цепь впечатлений, – которая одним концом накрепко прикована к живому, пульсирующему настоящему, а другим теряется в дымке времени, в странном, ирреальном прошлом. Трогая эту цепь, разум извлекает из далекого времени живые картины; каждая исчерпывающе полна: там люди, краски и звуки. Одновременно каждый образ – лишь эпизод в цепи событий, лишь миг бегущего времени, лишь маленькая ступень на этапе моего развития. Пять, десять, пятнадцать лет назад каждому из этих этапов соответствовали определенные надежды и разочарования, вера и убеждения.

Часть III. Обзор эволюции подводных сил СССР (1935-1941 гг.) [127]

Короли подплава в море червонных валетов. Часть III. Обзор эволюции подводных сил СССР (1935–1941 гг.)

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The Effects of a Global Thermonuclear War

Wm. Robert Johnston: Last updated 18 August 2003

4th edition: escalation in 1988 By Wm. Robert Johnston. Last updated 18 August 2003. Introduction The following is an approximate description of the effects of a global nuclear war. For the purposes of illustration it is assumed that a war resulted in mid-1988 from military conflict between the Warsaw Pact and NATO. This is in some ways a worst-case scenario (total numbers of strategic warheads deployed by the superpowers peaked about this time; the scenario implies a greater level of military readiness; and impact on global climate and crop yields are greatest for a war in August). Some details, such as the time of attack, the events leading to war, and the winds affecting fallout patterns, are only meant to be illustrative. This applies also to the global geopolitical aftermath, which represents the author's efforts at intelligent speculation. There is much public misconception concerning the physical effects of nuclear war--some of it motivated by politics. Certainly the predictions described here are uncertain: for example, casualty figures in the U.S. are accurate perhaps to within 30% for the first few days, but the number of survivors in the U.S. after one year could differ from these figures by as much as a factor of four. Nonetheless, there is no reasonable basis for expecting results radically different from this description--for example, there is no scientific basis for expecting the extinction of the human species. Note that the most severe predictions concerning nuclear winter have now been evaluated and discounted by most of the scientific community. Sources supplying the basis for this description include the U.S.

Глава II

Путешествие натуралиста вокруг света на корабле «Бигль». Глава II. Рио-де-Жанейро

Рио-де-Жанейро Поездка к северу от мыса Фрио Сильное испарение Рабство Залив Ботофого Наземные планарии Облака на Корковадо Сильный дождь Певчие лягушки Светящиеся насекомые Щелкун и его прыганье Синий туман Шум, производимый бабочкой Энтомология Муравьи Оса, убивающая жука Паразитический паук Уловки крестовика Пауки, живущие обществами Паук, ткущий несимметричную паутину С 4 апреля по 5 июля 1832 г. — Через несколько дней после нашего прибытия я познакомился с одним англичанином, который отправлялся в свое поместье, расположенное более чем в 100 милях от столицы, к северу от мыса Фрио. Я охотно принял его любезное приглашение ехать вместе с ним. 8 апреля. — Нас было семь человек. Первый переход оказался очень интересным. День был необыкновенно знойный, и, когда мы проезжали через лес, все вокруг было в полном покое, который нарушали лишь огромные великолепные бабочки, лениво порхавшие вокруг. С холмов за Прая-Гранди открылся прекрасный вид: среди ярких красок преобладал синий оттенок, небо и неподвижные воды залива великолепием своим соперничали друг с другом. Некоторое время дорога шла возделанными полями, после чего мы въехали в лес, грандиозность которого на всем его протяжении совершенно ни с чем не сравнима. К полудню мы прибыли в Итакаю. Эта деревушка лежит на равнине; дом, стоящий посредине селения, окружают хижины негров. Правильная форма и расположение этих хижин напомнили мне изображения готтентотских селений в Южной Африке.

XVII. Цена спасения

Побег из ГУЛАГа. Часть 3. XVII. Цена спасения

— Мама! — крикнул сын изо всей силы. Я уже бежала к шалашу. Из леса быстро шли двое военных. Где же он?.. Вот. Идет, шатается. Какое страшное лицо. Заплыло отеком, черное, у носа запеклась кровь... — Милый, милый, — мы опять держим его за руки; мальчик гладит его, целует, а муж бессильно опускается на низкий край сруба и смотрит мимо нас. — Что случилось? Дорогой, милый... — Папочка, вот, выпей. Мама сейчас чай приготовит, мы припрятали для тебя одну заварку и один кусочек сахара. — У них есть немного, — с трудом говорит он, показывая на финнов-пограничников, смотревших на нас в смущении. — Мне не дали купить, сказали — всего взяли, а сами почти все съели, — волнуется он. — Пустяки. Главное то, что мы спасены. Все будет хорошо. — Я шел два дня, голодный, ничего не ел; сапоги развалились. Они думали дойти скорее меня. Едва дотащил их, три дня шли... Я понимала, что они не могли представить себе, как идет человек, спасая все то, что у него осталось в жизни. Финны должны были ошибиться в расчете времени — они мерили его другой мерой. У мужа хрипело в груди. Он закашлялся и выплюнул в ссохшийся, почерневший от крови платок красный сгусток: — Расшибся, — сказал он тихо. — Дорога трудная? — Очень. Камни. Мальчик ласкался и чуть не плакал. Отчего папа такой, ничего не говорит, не рассказывает, будто не рад... Финны в это время сварили овсяную кашу.

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IV. Люди

Побег из ГУЛАГа. Часть 3. IV. Люди

Ночью идти было спокойнее. День, когда люди бродят даже по таким диким местам, опасен и тревожен. Мы шли быстро, и, чтобы быть меньше заметными, — отец впереди, на некотором расстоянии сын, потом я. Места были прекрасные: в глубине долины протекала полноводная река, то бурливая, то порожистая, как горные речки, то со спокойным широким плесом. По обрывистым берегам стояли высокие сосны. Тишина была полная: птицы уже не пели, зверья никакого не было видно. Вдруг, когда я еще ничего не успела заметить подозрительного, муж нагнулся и словно скатился под обрыв, за ним мальчик, за ним и я. Условленно было делать немедленно то, что делает вожак. Из-за края обрыва я увидела, что в нескольких саженях стояли дома: два или три. На другом берегу тоже был дом. Людей не было видно, но если бы мы увидали кого, и, следовательно, кто-то нас мог заметить, то это было бы печально. В панике мы заметались по округе, с обрыва бросились в лес, пересекли болото, пошли в гору. Я окончательно потеряла направление и ничего не понимала. Вуаль у меня была порвана сучками, на которые я натыкалась, под нее набились комары, поедали мои уши и слепили глаза. Солнце жгло. В лесу недвижно стояло паркое, сырое тепло. Я выбивалась из сил и не могла догнать отца с сыном, которые что-то видели, перебегали, нагнувшись, быстро шли в гору уже без всякой тропы. Наконец, они присели за огромную поваленную ель, собираясь, очевидно, поесть, потому что со вчерашнего дня еще никто не проглотил ни кусочка. Я не могла и думать о еде: сердце у меня билось, в висках стучало, и, дойдя до них, я бросилась ничком на землю, закрыв голову макинтошем, чтобы только передохнуть от комаров.

Глава XVII

Путешествие натуралиста вокруг света на корабле «Бигль». Глава XVII. Галапагосский архипелаг

Вся группа — вулканического происхождения Обилие кратеров Безлиственные кустарники Колония на острове Чарлз Остров Джемс Соляное озеро в кратере Естественная история архипелага Орнитология, своеобразные вьюрки Пресмыкающиеся Образ жизни исполинских черепах Морская ящерица, питающаяся водорослями Травоядная наземная ящерица, роющая норы Важное место пресмыкающихся на архипелаге Рыбы, моллюски, насекомые Растительность Американский тип организации Различия между видами или расами на различных островах Доверчивость птиц Страх перед человеком — инстинкт приобретаемый 15 сентября. — Этот архипелаг состоит из десяти главных островов, пять из которых особенно велики. Они расположены на самом экваторе, на расстоянии от 500 до 600 миль к западу от побережья Америки. Все они образованы вулканическими породами: немногочисленные обломки гранита, замечательно отполированные и измененные под действием высокой температуры, вряд ли можно считать исключением. Некоторые кратеры, возвышающиеся над более крупными островами, имеют громадные размеры и достигают высоты от 3 до 4 тысяч футов. Склоны их усеяны бесчисленными более мелкими отверстиями. Можно смело утверждать, что на всем архипелаге имеется по крайней мере две тысячи кратеров. Кратеры состоят либо из лавы и шлаков, либо из тонко наслоившегося вулканического туфа, похожего на песчаник.

Chapter X

The voyage of the Beagle. Chapter X. Tierra Del Fuego

Tierra del Fuego, first arrival Good Success Bay An Account of the Fuegians on board Interview With the Savages Scenery of the Forests Cape Horn Wigwam Cove Miserable Condition of the Savages Famines Cannibals Matricide Religious Feelings Great Gale Beagle Channel Ponsonby Sound Build Wigwams and settle the Fuegians Bifurcation of the Beagle Channel Glaciers Return to the Ship Second Visit in the Ship to the Settlement Equality of Condition amongst the Natives DECEMBER 17th, 1832.—Having now finished with Patagonia and the Falkland Islands, I will describe our first arrival in Tierra del Fuego. A little after noon we doubled Cape St. Diego, and entered the famous strait of Le Maire. We kept close to the Fuegian shore, but the outline of the rugged, inhospitable Statenland was visible amidst the clouds. In the afternoon we anchored in the Bay of Good Success. While entering we were saluted in a manner becoming the inhabitants of this savage land. A group of Fuegians partly concealed by the entangled forest, were perched on a wild point overhanging the sea; and as we passed by, they sprang up and waving their tattered cloaks sent forth a loud and sonorous shout. The savages followed the ship, and just before dark we saw their fire, and again heard their wild cry. The harbour consists of a fine piece of water half surrounded by low rounded mountains of clay-slate, which are covered to the water's edge by one dense gloomy forest. A single glance at the landscape was sufficient to show me how widely different it was from anything I had ever beheld.

Chapter XII

The voyage of the Beagle. Chapter XII. Central Chile

Valparaiso Excursion to the Foot of the Andes Structure of the Land Ascend the Bell of Quillota Shattered Masses of Greenstone Immense Valleys Mines State of Miners Santiago Hot-baths of Cauquenes Gold-mines Grinding-mills Perforated Stones Habits of the Puma El Turco and Tapacolo Humming-birds JULY 23rd.—The Beagle anchored late at night in the bay of Valparaiso, the chief seaport of Chile. When morning came, everything appeared delightful. After Tierra del Fuego, the climate felt quite delicious—the atmosphere so dry, and the heavens so clear and blue with the sun shining brightly, that all nature seemed sparkling with life. The view from the anchorage is very pretty. The town is built at the very foot of a range of hills, about 1600 feet high, and rather steep. From its position, it consists of one long, straggling street, which runs parallel to the beach, and wherever a ravine comes down, the houses are piled up on each side of it. The rounded hills, being only partially protected by a very scanty vegetation, are worn into numberless little gullies, which expose a singularly bright red soil. From this cause, and from the low whitewashed houses with tile roofs, the view reminded me of St. Cruz in Teneriffe. In a north-westerly direction there are some fine glimpses of the Andes: but these mountains appear much grander when viewed from the neighbouring hills: the great distance at which they are situated can then more readily be perceived. The volcano of Aconcagua is particularly magnificent.