The translator to the reader (of 1684)

THE present Volume, both for its Curiosity and Ingenuity, I dare recommend unto the perusal of our English nation, whose glorious actions it containeth. What relateth unto the curiosity hereof, this Piece, both of Natural and Humane History, was no sooner published in the Dutch Original, than it was snatch't up for the most curious Library's of Holland; it was Translated into Spanish (two impressions thereof being sent into Spain in one year); it was taken notice of by the learned Academy of Paris; and finally recommended as worthy our esteem, by the ingenious Author of the Weekly Memorials for the Ingenious, printed here at London about two years ago. Neither all this undeservedly, seeing it enlargeth our acquaintance of Natural History, so much prized and enquir'd for, by the Learned of this present Age, with several observations not easily to be found in other accounts already received from America: and besides, it informeth us (with huge novelty) of as great and bold attempts, in point of Military conduct and valour, as ever were performed by mankind; without excepting, here, either Alexander the Great, or Julius Cæsar, or the rest of the Nine Worthy's of Fame. Of all which actions, as we cannot confess ourselves to have been ignorant hitherto (the very name of Bucaniers being, as yet, known but unto few of the Ingenious; as their Lives, Laws, and Conversation, are in a manner unto none) so can they not choose but be admired, out of this ingenuous Author, by whosoever is curious to learn the various revolutions of humane affairs. But, more especially by our English Nation; as unto whom these things more narrowly do appertain. We having here more than half the Book filled with the unparallel'd, if not inimitable, adventures and Heroick exploits of our own Country-men, and Relations; whose undaunted, and exemplary courage, when called upon by our King and Country, we ought to emulate.

From whence it hath proceeded, that nothing of this kind was ever, as yet, published in England, I cannot easily determine; except, as some will say, from some secret Ragion di Stato. Let the reason be as t'will; this is certain, so much the more we are obliged unto this present Author, who though a stranger unto our Nation, yet with that Candour and Fidelity hath recorded our Actions, as to render the Metal of our true English Valour to be the more believed and feared abroad, than if these things had been divulged by our selves at home. From hence peradventure will other Nations learn, that the English people are of their Genius more inclinable to act than to write; seeing as well they as we have lived unacquainted with these actions of our Nation, until such time as a Foreign Author to our Country came to tell them.

Besides the merits of this Piece for its curiosity, another point of no less esteem, is the truth and sincerity wherewith everything seemeth to be penned. No greater ornament or dignity can be added unto History, either humane or natural, than truth. All other embellishments, if this be failing, are of little or no esteem; if this be delivered, are either needless or superfluous. What concerneth this requisite in our Author, his lines do everywhere declare the faithfulness and sincerity of his mind. He writeth not by hearsay, but was an eye witness, as he somewhere telleth you, unto all and every one of the bold and hazardous attempts which he relateth. And these he delivereth with such candour of stile, such ingenuity of mind, such plainness of words, such conciseness of periods, so much divested of Rhetorical Hyperboles, or the least flourishes of Eloquence, so hugely void of Passion or national Reflections, as that he strongly perswadeth all-along to the credit of what he saith; yea, raiseth the mind of the Reader to believe these things far greater than what he hath said; and having read him, leaveth onely this scruple or concern behind, that you can read him no longer. In a word, such are his deserts, that some persons peradventure would not stickle to compare him to the Father of Historians, Philip de Comines; at least thus much may be said, with all truth imaginable, that he resembleth that great Author in many of his excellent qualities.

I know some persons have objected against the greatness of these prodigious Adventures, intimating that the resistance our Bucaniers found in America, was everywhere but small. For the Spaniards, say they, in the West Indies, are become of late years nothing less, but rather much more degenerate than in Europe. The continual Peace they have enjoyed in those parts, the defect of Military Discipline, and European souldiers for their Commanders, much contributing hereunto. But more especially, and above all other reasons, the very luxury of the Soil and Riches, the extreme heat of those Countries, and influence of the Stars being such, as totally inclineth their bodies unto an infinite effeminacy and cowardize of minds.

Unto these Reasons I shall only answer in brief. This History will convince them to be manifestly false. For as to the continual Peace here alleadged, we know that no Peace could ever be established beyond the Line, since the first possession of the West-Indies by the Spaniards, till the burning of Panama. At that time, or few months before, Sir William Godolphin by his prudent negotiation in quality of Embassadour for our most Gracious Monarch, did conclude at Madrid a peace to be observed even beyond the Line, and through the whole extent of the Spanish Dominions in the West-Indies. This transaction gave the Spaniards new causes of complaints against our proceedings, that no sooner a Peace had been established for those parts of America, but our forces had taken and burnt both Chagre, St. Catherine, and Panama. But our reply was convincing, That whereas eight or ten months of time had been allowed by Articles for the publishing of the said Peace through all the Dominions of both Monarchies in America, those Hostilities had been committed, not onely without orders from his Majesty of England, but also within the space of the said eight or ten months of time. Until that time the Spanish Inhabitants of America being, as it were, in a perpetual War with Europe, certain it is that no Coasts nor Kingdoms in the World have been more frequently infested nor alarm'd with the invasions of several Nations than theirs. Thus from the very beginning of their Conquests in America, both English, French, Dutch Portuguese, Swedes, Danes, Curlanders, and all other nations that navigate the Ocean, have frequented the West-Indies, and filled them with their robberies and Assaults. From these occasions have they been in continual watch and ward, and kept their Militia in constant exercise, as also their Garrisons pretty well provided and paid; as fearing every sail they discovered at Sea, to be Pirats of one Nation or another. But much more especially, since that Curasao, Tortuga, and Jamaica have been inhabited by English, French, and Dutch, and bred up that race of Hunts-men, than which, no other ever was more desperate, nor more mortal enemies to the Spaniards, called Bucaniers. Now shall we say, that these People, through too long continuation of Peace, have utterly abolished the exercises of War, having been all-along incessantly vexed with the Tumults and Alarms thereof?

In like manner is it false, to accuse their defect of Military Discipline for want of European Commanders. For who knoweth not that all places, both Military and Civil, through those vast dominions of the West-Indies, are provided out of Spain? And those of the Militia most commonly given unto expert Commanders, trained up from their infancy in the Wars of Europe, either in Africa, Milan, Sicily, Naples, or Flanders, fighting against either English, French, Dutch, Portuguese, or Moors? Yea their very Garrisons, if you search them in those parts, will peradventure be found to be stock'd three parts to four with Souldiers both born and bred in the Kingdom of Spain.

From these Considerations it may be inferr'd what little difference ought to be allowed betwixt the Spanish Souldiers, Inhabitants of the West-Indies, and those of Europe. And how little the Soil or Climate hath influenced or caused their Courage to degenerate towards cowardize or baseness of mind. As if the very same Argument, deduced from the nature of that Climate, did not equally militate against the valour of our famous Bucaniers, and represent this to be of as degenerate Metal as theirs.

But nothing can be more clearly evinced, than is the Valour of the American Spaniards, either Souldiers or Officers, by the sequel of this History. What men ever fought more desperately than the Garrison of Chagre? Their number being 314, and of all these, only thirty remaining; of which number scarce ten were unwounded; and among them, not one officer found alive? Were not 600 killed upon the spot at Panama, 500 at Gibraltar, almost as many more at Puerto del Principe, all dying with their Arms in their hands, and facing bravely the Enemy for the defence of their Country and private Concerns? Did not those of the Town of San Pedro both fortifie themselves, lay several Ambuscades, and lastly sell their lives as dear as any European Souldier could do; Lolonois being forced to gain step by step his advance unto the Town, with huge loss both of bloud and men? Many other instances might be produced out of this compendious Volume, of the generous resistance the Spaniards made in several places, though Fortune favoured not their Arms.

Next, as to the personal Valour of many of their Commanders, What man ever behaved himself more briskly than the Governour of Gibraltar, than the Governour of Puerto del Principe, both dying for the defence of their Towns; than Don Alonso del Campo, and others? Or what examples can easily parallel the desperate courage of the Governour of Chagre? who, though the Palizda's were fired, the Terraplens were sunk into the Ditch, the Breaches were entred, the Houses all burnt above him, the whole Castle taken, his men all killed; yet would not admit of any quarter, but chose rather to die under his Arms, being shot into the brain, than surrender himself as a Prisoner unto the Bucaniers. What lion ever fought to the last gasp more obstinately than the Governour of Puerto Velo? who, seeing the Town enter'd by surprizal in the night, one chief Castle blown up into the Air, all the other Forts and Castles taken, his own assaulted several ways, both Religious men and women placed at the front of the Enemy to fix the Ladders against the Walls; yet spared not to kill as many of the said Religious persons as he could. And at last, the walls being scaled, the Castle enter'd and taken, all his own men overcome by fire and sword, who had cast down their Arms, and begged mercy from the Enemy; yet would admit of none for his own life. Yet, with his own hands killed several of his Souldiers, to force them to stand to their Arms, though all were lost. Yea, though his own Wife and Daughter begged of him upon their knees that he would have his life by craving quarter, though the Enemy desired of him the same thing; yet would hearken to no cries nor perswasions, but they were forced to kill him, combating with his Arms in his hands, being not otherwise able to take him Prisoner, as they were desirous to do. Shall these men be said to be influenced with Cowardize, who thus acted to the very last Scene of their own Tragedies? Or shall we rather say that they wanted no Courage, but Fortune? It being certainly true, that he who is killed in a Batel, may be equally couragious with him that killeth. And that whosoever derogateth from the Valour of the Spaniards in the West-Indies, diminisheth in like manner the Courage of the Bucaniers, his own Country-men, who have seemed to act beyond mortal men in America.

Now, to say something concerning John Esquemeling, the first Author of this History. I take him to be a Dutch-man, or at least born in Flanders, notwithstanding that the Spanish Translation representeth him to be a Native of the Kingdom of France. His printing this History originally in Dutch, which doubtless must be his native Tongue, who otherwise was but an illiterate man, together with the very sound of his name, convincing me thereunto. True it is, he set sail from France, and was some years at Tortuga; but neither of these two Arguments, drawn from the History, are prevalent. For were he to be a French-man born, how came he to learn the Dutch language so perfectly as to prefer it to his own? Especially that not being spoken at Tortuga nor Jamaica, where he resided all the while.

I hope I have made this English Translation something more plain and correct than the Spanish. Some few notorious faults either of the Printer or the Interpreter, I am sure I have redressed. But the Spanish Translator complaining much of the intricacy of Stile in the Original (as flowing from a person who, as hath been said, was no Scholar) as he was pardonable, being in great haste, for not rendring his own Version so distinct and elaborate as he could desire; so must I be excused from the one, that is to say, Elegancy, if I have cautiously declined the other, I mean Confusion.

1291 - 1337

From 1291 to 1337

Late High Middle Ages. From the Fall of Acre in 1291 to the beginning of the Hundred Years' War in 1337.

Chapter V

The voyage of the Beagle. Chapter V. Bahia Blanca

Bahia Blanca Geology Numerous gigantic Quadrupeds Recent Extinction Longevity of species Large Animals do not require a luxuriant vegetation Southern Africa Siberian Fossils Two Species of Ostrich Habits of Oven-bird Armadilloes Venomous Snake, Toad, Lizard Hybernation of Animal Habits of Sea-Pen Indian Wars and Massacres Arrow-head, antiquarian Relic The Beagle arrived here on the 24th of August, and a week afterwards sailed for the Plata. With Captain Fitz Roy's consent I was left behind, to travel by land to Buenos Ayres. I will here add some observations, which were made during this visit and on a previous occasion, when the Beagle was employed in surveying the harbour. The plain, at the distance of a few miles from the coast, belongs to the great Pampean formation, which consists in part of a reddish clay, and in part of a highly calcareous marly rock. Nearer the coast there are some plains formed from the wreck of the upper plain, and from mud, gravel, and sand thrown up by the sea during the slow elevation of the land, of which elevation we have evidence in upraised beds of recent shells, and in rounded pebbles of pumice scattered over the country. At Punta Alta we have a section of one of these later-formed little plains, which is highly interesting from the number and extraordinary character of the remains of gigantic land-animals embedded in it. These have been fully described by Professor Owen, in the Zoology of the voyage of the Beagle, and are deposited in the College of Surgeons.

Глава 3

Сквозь ад русской революции. Воспоминания гардемарина. 1914–1919. Глава 3

В первые девяносто дней войны население приспосабливалось в тылу к новым условиям существования. Необходимо было удовлетворить многочисленные нужды страны, ведущей военные действия. Для каждого находилось много работы. Повсюду наблюдались разительные перемены, по мере того как женщины заменяли мужчин в промышленности. Когда в деревнях остались лишь старики и дети, основная нагрузка пала на плечи жен и дочерей, которые постоянно принимали участие в полевых работах, но испытывали большие трудности из-за нехватки лошадей, реквизированных армией. Муниципалитет Петрограда набирал женщин в качестве кондукторов уличных конок, что считалось настолько необычным, что спровоцировало множество доброжелательных шуток и карикатур. Женщины выполняли и другую работу, еще более непосредственно связанную с войной. По западным стандартам обеспечение русской армии продовольствием не отвечало необходимым требованиям, равно как и денежное содержание солдат. Хотя фронтовики снабжались обмундированием на должном уровне, им постоянно не хватало мелочей, о которых командование не позаботилось, а они были солдатам не по карману, но совершенно необходимы для минимального комфорта. Поэтому женщины из семей скромного достатка снабжали фронтовиков небольшим количеством табака и мыла. Занятые домашним хозяйством, свободные минуты женщины тратили на вязание шарфов, носков, рукавиц и других теплых вещей. Из набивного ситца изготавливали кисеты для табака и платки. Простыни разрывались на длинные полосы, чтобы у солдат было достаточно портянок. Все это упаковывали в старые коробки и ящики.

Chapter IV

The voyage of the Beagle. Chapter IV. Rio Negro to Bahia Blanca

Rio Negro Estancias attacked by the Indians Salt-Lakes Flamingoes R. Negro to R. Colorado Sacred Tree Patagonian Hare Indian Families General Rosas Proceed to Bahia Blanca Sand Dunes Negro Lieutenant Bahia Blanca Saline Incrustations Punta Alta Zorillo. JULY 24th, 1833.—The Beagle sailed from Maldonado, and on August the 3rd she arrived off the mouth of the Rio Negro. This is the principal river on the whole line of coast between the Strait of Magellan and the Plata. It enters the sea about three hundred miles south of the estuary of the Plata. About fifty years ago, under the old Spanish government, a small colony was established here; and it is still the most southern position (lat. 41 degs.) on this eastern coast of America inhabited by civilized man. The country near the mouth of the river is wretched in the extreme: on the south side a long line of perpendicular cliffs commences, which exposes a section of the geological nature of the country. The strata are of sandstone, and one layer was remarkable from being composed of a firmly-cemented conglomerate of pumice pebbles, which must have travelled more than four hundred miles, from the Andes. The surface is everywhere covered up by a thick bed of gravel, which extends far and wide over the open plain. Water is extremely scarce, and, where found, is almost invariably brackish.

9 000 г. до н.э. - 5000 г. до н.э.

С 9 000 г. до н.э. по 5000 г. до н.э.

От появления земледелия и скотоводства до начала использования меди в некоторых регионах.

Iron Age

Iron Age : from 1200 to 800 BC

Iron Age : from 1200 to 800 BC.

4. Развитие Мурманска и «Севгосрыбтреста» до 1929 года

Записки «вредителя». Часть I. Время террора. 4. Развитие Мурманска и «Севгосрыбтреста» до 1929 года

В Мурманске, где каждую пядь площади надо было отвоевывать у моря, была создана новая, прекрасно оборудованная гавань с громадной пропускной способностью, хотя при этом надо было экономить каждую копейку и изощряться в том, чтобы добыть и материалы и рабочую силу. Громадный железобетонный склад с бетонными чанами для засолки рыбы, с единовременной вместимостью 5000 тонн; трехэтажный железобетонный фильтровочный завод для приготовления медицинского рыбьего жира, оборудованный со всей возможной внимательностью; утилизационный завод для выработки кормовой муки из рыбных отходов — все это было создано за четыре года. В постройке находились холодильники для скорого замораживания рыбы и бондарный завод. К пристани был подведен железнодорожный подъездной путь; построен свой водопровод, ремонтная мастерская для судов и своя временная электростанция, так как городская не могла отпускать достаточно энергии. Для выгрузки траулеров были введены электрические лебедки. Мурманск стал расти на прочной основе развивающейся промышленности. Дома «Севгосрыбтреста» впервые были поставлены в определенном порядке, и в Мурманске появились улицы. Колонизация Мурмана, над которой столько лет бесплодно бились и которая стоила огромных средств, получила, наконец, реальное осуществление. Насколько помню, город развивался за последние годы следующим образом: в 1926 году — 4 000 жителей, в 1927 году — 7 000; в 1928 году — 12 000; в 1929 году — 15 000.

13. Мы все учились понемногу... Судмедэксперт Возрожденный как зеркало советской судебной медицины

Перевал Дятлова. Смерть, идущая по следу... 13. Мы все учились понемногу... Судмедэксперт Возрожденный как зеркало советской судебной медицины

Требования к полноте судебно-медицинского исследования тела погибшего человека менялось сообразно развитию медицины вообще и судебной медицины в частности. Сейчас в широком доступе находятся, например, протоколы вскрытия тел отца Наполеона (1785 г.), самого Наполеона (1823 г.) и Андрея Ющинского (1911 г.), того самого мальчика, чья трагическая гибель инициировала широко известное "дело Бейлиса". По этим документам можно проследить развитие судебно-медицинских представлений о полноте посмертного изучения человеческого тела и реконструкции причин, обусловивших его смерть. В царской России анатомирование погибших насильственной смертью с целью установления причин смерти было введено законодательно в 1809 г. постановлением Сената (для военнослужащих эту дату следует отодвинуть почти на век - в 1716 г. - но в рамках нашего исследования подобное уточнение совершенно несущественно). В Советской России установление единообразия и наведение порядка в деле судебно-медицинского обеспечения деятельности правоохранительных органов, началось во второй половине 20-х гг. прошлого столетия. В 1928 г. появились "Правила для составления заключения о тяжести повреждения", описывающие порядок прохождения судебно-медицинской экспертизы живым человеком. На следующий год появились "Правила судебномедицинского исследования трупов". Чуть позже - в 1934 г. - советская бюрократическая машина родила "Правила амбулаторного судебно-медицинского акушерско-гинекологического исследования", документ, ориентированный на борьбу с криминальными абортами. Дело заключалось в том, что тогда аборты были запрещены законодательно и, соотвественно, все они стали криминальными (за исключением особо оговоренных случаев).

Судьба катеров после войны

«Шнелльботы». Германские торпедные катера Второй мировой войны. Судьба катеров после войны

Послевоенная жизнь «шнелльботов» была весьма непродолжительной. Их примерно поровну поделили между державами-победительницами. Подавляющее большинство из 32 «шнелльботов», доставшихся Великобритании, было сдано на слом либо затоплено в Северном море в течение двух лет после окончания войны. Расчетливые американцы выставили 26 своих катеров на продажу, и даже сумели извлечь из этого выгоду, «сплавив» их флотам Норвегии и Дании. Полученные СССР по репарациям «шнелльботы» (29 единиц) совсем недолго находились в боевом составе ВМФ - сказалось отсутствие запасных частей, да и сами корпуса были сильно изношены; 12 из них попали в КБФ, где прослужили до февраля 1948 года. Остальные перешли на Север, где 8 катеров были списаны, не пробыв в строю и года. Продлить жизнь остальных до июня 1952 года удалось, использовав механизмы с исключенных «шнелльботов». Экономные датчане дотянули эксплуатацию своих трофеев до 1966 года. Часть катеров они перекупили у Норвегии; всего их в датском флоте насчитывалось 19 единиц. Во флоте ФРГ осталось лишь два «шнелльбота» - бывшие S-116 и S-130. Они использовались в качестве опытовых судов, и к 1965 году были сданы на слом. До наших дней не дожило ни одного немецкого торпедного катера периода Второй мировой войны. Единственными экспонатами, связанными со «шнелльботами», были два дизеля МВ-501, снятые с S-116 и находившиеся в Техническом музее в Мюнхене. Но и они погибли во время пожара в апреле 1983 года.

15. Физико-техническая экспертиза. Прекращение расследования, закрытие уголовного дела

Перевал Дятлова. Смерть, идущая по следу... 15. Физико-техническая экспертиза. Прекращение расследования, закрытие уголовного дела

Итак, 9 мая 1959 г. судмедэксперт Возрождённый закончил свою скорбную работу и тела четырёх туристов, найденные в овраге, были отправлены в Свердловск для предания земле. Погибшие находились в закрытых гробах и их тела не были предъявлены близким, лишь отец Людмилы Дубининой - Александр Николаевич - сумел добиться, чтобы для него было сделано исключение. Увидев останки дочери, он едва не лишился чувств. Гроб с телом Семёна Золотарёва забрала его мать, приехавшая с Северного Кавказа, остальные трое туристов были похоронены на Михайловском кладбище рядом со своими товарищами по группе, чьи тела нашли в феврале-марте. Теперь там поставлен общий монумент с фотографиями туристов, а также Никитина, похороненного здесь же. Есть среди них и фотографии Кривонищенко и Золотарёва, хотя захоронения их находятся в других местах. Во время майских похорон не обошлось без душераздирающих моментов. Так, например, мать Николая Тибо-Бриньоля вспомнила, как не хотела отпускать сына в этот январский поход, уговаривала его покончить с туристическими вылазками на природу, мол, не мальчик он уже, институт закончил, пора взрослеть. Коля пообещал матери, что этот поход будет последним в его жизни...

XVII. Цена спасения

Побег из ГУЛАГа. Часть 3. XVII. Цена спасения

— Мама! — крикнул сын изо всей силы. Я уже бежала к шалашу. Из леса быстро шли двое военных. Где же он?.. Вот. Идет, шатается. Какое страшное лицо. Заплыло отеком, черное, у носа запеклась кровь... — Милый, милый, — мы опять держим его за руки; мальчик гладит его, целует, а муж бессильно опускается на низкий край сруба и смотрит мимо нас. — Что случилось? Дорогой, милый... — Папочка, вот, выпей. Мама сейчас чай приготовит, мы припрятали для тебя одну заварку и один кусочек сахара. — У них есть немного, — с трудом говорит он, показывая на финнов-пограничников, смотревших на нас в смущении. — Мне не дали купить, сказали — всего взяли, а сами почти все съели, — волнуется он. — Пустяки. Главное то, что мы спасены. Все будет хорошо. — Я шел два дня, голодный, ничего не ел; сапоги развалились. Они думали дойти скорее меня. Едва дотащил их, три дня шли... Я понимала, что они не могли представить себе, как идет человек, спасая все то, что у него осталось в жизни. Финны должны были ошибиться в расчете времени — они мерили его другой мерой. У мужа хрипело в груди. Он закашлялся и выплюнул в ссохшийся, почерневший от крови платок красный сгусток: — Расшибся, — сказал он тихо. — Дорога трудная? — Очень. Камни. Мальчик ласкался и чуть не плакал. Отчего папа такой, ничего не говорит, не рассказывает, будто не рад... Финны в это время сварили овсяную кашу.

Глава XXI

Путешествие натуралиста вокруг света на корабле «Бигль». Глава XXI. От Маврикия до Англии

Остров Маврикий, его красивый вид Громадное кольцо гор, расположенных в виде кратера Индусы Остров св. Елены История изменения растительности Причина вымирания наземных моллюсков Остров Вознесения Изменение ввезенных крыс Вулканические бомбы Пласты инфузорий Баия Бразилия Великолепие тропического пейзажа Пернамбуку Своеобразный риф Рабство Возвращение в Англию Обзор нашего путешествия 29 апреля. — Утром мы обогнули северную оконечность острова Маврикий, или Иль-де-Франс. Открывшийся перед нами вид на остров вполне оправдал наши ожидания, возбужденные многочисленными известными описаниями его красот. На переднем плане раскинулась пологая равнина Панплемусс с разбросанными по ней домами; обширные плантации сахарного тростника окрашивали ее в ярко-зеленый цвет. Яркость зелени была тем более замечательна, что этот цвет бросается в глаза обыкновенно лишь с очень короткого расстояния. К центру острова над прекрасно возделанной равниной поднимались группы лесистых гор; их вершины, как то обыкновенно бывает с древними вулканическими породами, представляли собой ряд необычайно острых пиков. Вокруг этих вершин собирались массы белых облаков, словно для того, чтобы усладить взоры путешественника. Весь остров с его пологой "прибрежной полосой и горами в середине был полон какого-то безукоризненного изящества; пейзаж казался взору гармоничным (если позволительно так выразиться). Большую часть следующего дня я провел, гуляя по городу и посещая разных лиц. Город довольно велик и насчитывает, говорят, 20 тысяч жителей; улицы очень чистые и правильные.