The translator to the reader (of 1684)

THE present Volume, both for its Curiosity and Ingenuity, I dare recommend unto the perusal of our English nation, whose glorious actions it containeth. What relateth unto the curiosity hereof, this Piece, both of Natural and Humane History, was no sooner published in the Dutch Original, than it was snatch't up for the most curious Library's of Holland; it was Translated into Spanish (two impressions thereof being sent into Spain in one year); it was taken notice of by the learned Academy of Paris; and finally recommended as worthy our esteem, by the ingenious Author of the Weekly Memorials for the Ingenious, printed here at London about two years ago. Neither all this undeservedly, seeing it enlargeth our acquaintance of Natural History, so much prized and enquir'd for, by the Learned of this present Age, with several observations not easily to be found in other accounts already received from America: and besides, it informeth us (with huge novelty) of as great and bold attempts, in point of Military conduct and valour, as ever were performed by mankind; without excepting, here, either Alexander the Great, or Julius Cæsar, or the rest of the Nine Worthy's of Fame. Of all which actions, as we cannot confess ourselves to have been ignorant hitherto (the very name of Bucaniers being, as yet, known but unto few of the Ingenious; as their Lives, Laws, and Conversation, are in a manner unto none) so can they not choose but be admired, out of this ingenuous Author, by whosoever is curious to learn the various revolutions of humane affairs. But, more especially by our English Nation; as unto whom these things more narrowly do appertain. We having here more than half the Book filled with the unparallel'd, if not inimitable, adventures and Heroick exploits of our own Country-men, and Relations; whose undaunted, and exemplary courage, when called upon by our King and Country, we ought to emulate.

From whence it hath proceeded, that nothing of this kind was ever, as yet, published in England, I cannot easily determine; except, as some will say, from some secret Ragion di Stato. Let the reason be as t'will; this is certain, so much the more we are obliged unto this present Author, who though a stranger unto our Nation, yet with that Candour and Fidelity hath recorded our Actions, as to render the Metal of our true English Valour to be the more believed and feared abroad, than if these things had been divulged by our selves at home. From hence peradventure will other Nations learn, that the English people are of their Genius more inclinable to act than to write; seeing as well they as we have lived unacquainted with these actions of our Nation, until such time as a Foreign Author to our Country came to tell them.

Besides the merits of this Piece for its curiosity, another point of no less esteem, is the truth and sincerity wherewith everything seemeth to be penned. No greater ornament or dignity can be added unto History, either humane or natural, than truth. All other embellishments, if this be failing, are of little or no esteem; if this be delivered, are either needless or superfluous. What concerneth this requisite in our Author, his lines do everywhere declare the faithfulness and sincerity of his mind. He writeth not by hearsay, but was an eye witness, as he somewhere telleth you, unto all and every one of the bold and hazardous attempts which he relateth. And these he delivereth with such candour of stile, such ingenuity of mind, such plainness of words, such conciseness of periods, so much divested of Rhetorical Hyperboles, or the least flourishes of Eloquence, so hugely void of Passion or national Reflections, as that he strongly perswadeth all-along to the credit of what he saith; yea, raiseth the mind of the Reader to believe these things far greater than what he hath said; and having read him, leaveth onely this scruple or concern behind, that you can read him no longer. In a word, such are his deserts, that some persons peradventure would not stickle to compare him to the Father of Historians, Philip de Comines; at least thus much may be said, with all truth imaginable, that he resembleth that great Author in many of his excellent qualities.

I know some persons have objected against the greatness of these prodigious Adventures, intimating that the resistance our Bucaniers found in America, was everywhere but small. For the Spaniards, say they, in the West Indies, are become of late years nothing less, but rather much more degenerate than in Europe. The continual Peace they have enjoyed in those parts, the defect of Military Discipline, and European souldiers for their Commanders, much contributing hereunto. But more especially, and above all other reasons, the very luxury of the Soil and Riches, the extreme heat of those Countries, and influence of the Stars being such, as totally inclineth their bodies unto an infinite effeminacy and cowardize of minds.

Unto these Reasons I shall only answer in brief. This History will convince them to be manifestly false. For as to the continual Peace here alleadged, we know that no Peace could ever be established beyond the Line, since the first possession of the West-Indies by the Spaniards, till the burning of Panama. At that time, or few months before, Sir William Godolphin by his prudent negotiation in quality of Embassadour for our most Gracious Monarch, did conclude at Madrid a peace to be observed even beyond the Line, and through the whole extent of the Spanish Dominions in the West-Indies. This transaction gave the Spaniards new causes of complaints against our proceedings, that no sooner a Peace had been established for those parts of America, but our forces had taken and burnt both Chagre, St. Catherine, and Panama. But our reply was convincing, That whereas eight or ten months of time had been allowed by Articles for the publishing of the said Peace through all the Dominions of both Monarchies in America, those Hostilities had been committed, not onely without orders from his Majesty of England, but also within the space of the said eight or ten months of time. Until that time the Spanish Inhabitants of America being, as it were, in a perpetual War with Europe, certain it is that no Coasts nor Kingdoms in the World have been more frequently infested nor alarm'd with the invasions of several Nations than theirs. Thus from the very beginning of their Conquests in America, both English, French, Dutch Portuguese, Swedes, Danes, Curlanders, and all other nations that navigate the Ocean, have frequented the West-Indies, and filled them with their robberies and Assaults. From these occasions have they been in continual watch and ward, and kept their Militia in constant exercise, as also their Garrisons pretty well provided and paid; as fearing every sail they discovered at Sea, to be Pirats of one Nation or another. But much more especially, since that Curasao, Tortuga, and Jamaica have been inhabited by English, French, and Dutch, and bred up that race of Hunts-men, than which, no other ever was more desperate, nor more mortal enemies to the Spaniards, called Bucaniers. Now shall we say, that these People, through too long continuation of Peace, have utterly abolished the exercises of War, having been all-along incessantly vexed with the Tumults and Alarms thereof?

In like manner is it false, to accuse their defect of Military Discipline for want of European Commanders. For who knoweth not that all places, both Military and Civil, through those vast dominions of the West-Indies, are provided out of Spain? And those of the Militia most commonly given unto expert Commanders, trained up from their infancy in the Wars of Europe, either in Africa, Milan, Sicily, Naples, or Flanders, fighting against either English, French, Dutch, Portuguese, or Moors? Yea their very Garrisons, if you search them in those parts, will peradventure be found to be stock'd three parts to four with Souldiers both born and bred in the Kingdom of Spain.

From these Considerations it may be inferr'd what little difference ought to be allowed betwixt the Spanish Souldiers, Inhabitants of the West-Indies, and those of Europe. And how little the Soil or Climate hath influenced or caused their Courage to degenerate towards cowardize or baseness of mind. As if the very same Argument, deduced from the nature of that Climate, did not equally militate against the valour of our famous Bucaniers, and represent this to be of as degenerate Metal as theirs.

But nothing can be more clearly evinced, than is the Valour of the American Spaniards, either Souldiers or Officers, by the sequel of this History. What men ever fought more desperately than the Garrison of Chagre? Their number being 314, and of all these, only thirty remaining; of which number scarce ten were unwounded; and among them, not one officer found alive? Were not 600 killed upon the spot at Panama, 500 at Gibraltar, almost as many more at Puerto del Principe, all dying with their Arms in their hands, and facing bravely the Enemy for the defence of their Country and private Concerns? Did not those of the Town of San Pedro both fortifie themselves, lay several Ambuscades, and lastly sell their lives as dear as any European Souldier could do; Lolonois being forced to gain step by step his advance unto the Town, with huge loss both of bloud and men? Many other instances might be produced out of this compendious Volume, of the generous resistance the Spaniards made in several places, though Fortune favoured not their Arms.

Next, as to the personal Valour of many of their Commanders, What man ever behaved himself more briskly than the Governour of Gibraltar, than the Governour of Puerto del Principe, both dying for the defence of their Towns; than Don Alonso del Campo, and others? Or what examples can easily parallel the desperate courage of the Governour of Chagre? who, though the Palizda's were fired, the Terraplens were sunk into the Ditch, the Breaches were entred, the Houses all burnt above him, the whole Castle taken, his men all killed; yet would not admit of any quarter, but chose rather to die under his Arms, being shot into the brain, than surrender himself as a Prisoner unto the Bucaniers. What lion ever fought to the last gasp more obstinately than the Governour of Puerto Velo? who, seeing the Town enter'd by surprizal in the night, one chief Castle blown up into the Air, all the other Forts and Castles taken, his own assaulted several ways, both Religious men and women placed at the front of the Enemy to fix the Ladders against the Walls; yet spared not to kill as many of the said Religious persons as he could. And at last, the walls being scaled, the Castle enter'd and taken, all his own men overcome by fire and sword, who had cast down their Arms, and begged mercy from the Enemy; yet would admit of none for his own life. Yet, with his own hands killed several of his Souldiers, to force them to stand to their Arms, though all were lost. Yea, though his own Wife and Daughter begged of him upon their knees that he would have his life by craving quarter, though the Enemy desired of him the same thing; yet would hearken to no cries nor perswasions, but they were forced to kill him, combating with his Arms in his hands, being not otherwise able to take him Prisoner, as they were desirous to do. Shall these men be said to be influenced with Cowardize, who thus acted to the very last Scene of their own Tragedies? Or shall we rather say that they wanted no Courage, but Fortune? It being certainly true, that he who is killed in a Batel, may be equally couragious with him that killeth. And that whosoever derogateth from the Valour of the Spaniards in the West-Indies, diminisheth in like manner the Courage of the Bucaniers, his own Country-men, who have seemed to act beyond mortal men in America.

Now, to say something concerning John Esquemeling, the first Author of this History. I take him to be a Dutch-man, or at least born in Flanders, notwithstanding that the Spanish Translation representeth him to be a Native of the Kingdom of France. His printing this History originally in Dutch, which doubtless must be his native Tongue, who otherwise was but an illiterate man, together with the very sound of his name, convincing me thereunto. True it is, he set sail from France, and was some years at Tortuga; but neither of these two Arguments, drawn from the History, are prevalent. For were he to be a French-man born, how came he to learn the Dutch language so perfectly as to prefer it to his own? Especially that not being spoken at Tortuga nor Jamaica, where he resided all the while.

I hope I have made this English Translation something more plain and correct than the Spanish. Some few notorious faults either of the Printer or the Interpreter, I am sure I have redressed. But the Spanish Translator complaining much of the intricacy of Stile in the Original (as flowing from a person who, as hath been said, was no Scholar) as he was pardonable, being in great haste, for not rendring his own Version so distinct and elaborate as he could desire; so must I be excused from the one, that is to say, Elegancy, if I have cautiously declined the other, I mean Confusion.

V. Гепеустовская волынка

Побег из ГУЛАГа. Часть 2. V. Гепеустовская волынка

При дневном свете городишко оказался еще меньше: если бы не мрачный дом ГПУ, все было бы мирно, сонно, местами даже красиво, особенно там, где виден изрезанный бухтами глубокий залив. Здесь говорится — губа. Но Север — безнадежный. Одни болота и граниты. Пришли в комендатуру: узкий коридорчик, дощатая переборка, в ней окошко, как на Шпалерке, в помещении для передач, только все меньше. За окошком сидит здоровенный детина — гепеуст... Рожа круглая, сытая, румяная, сам толстый и такой же нахальный, как все. — Как мне получить разрешение на свидание с таким-то? — называю ему фамилию, надеясь, что он скажет, что разрешение для него уже есть. — Стол свиданий, — отвечает он, ни о чем не справляясь. — Но муж писал мне, что хлопочет о свидании, может быть, разрешение уже есть. — Стол свиданий. Щелк, окошко захлопывается. Не у кого даже спросить, где этот «стол свиданий». Выходим на улицу. Кто-то проходит мимо, но все похожи на заключенных, а с ними разговаривать нельзя, еще наделаешь им беды... Идем в управление ГПУ. Не поймешь, куда войти. Наконец, попадается гепеуст. — Скажите, где стол свиданий? — Второй этаж, — буркнул он на ходу. — Как же туда попасть? — кричу ему вдогонку. Махнул рукой — за угол дома. Верно. Нашли вход в канцелярию; окошечко, надпись: «Стол свиданий». Очередь: две пожилые интеллигентки, баба с грудным ребенком, которого она держит под полушубком, и дама в котиковом манто.

Годы решений

Освальд Шпенглер : Годы решений / Пер. с нем. В. В. Афанасьева; Общая редакция А.В. Михайловского.- М.: СКИМЕНЪ, 2006.- 240с.- (Серия «В поисках утраченного»)

Введение Едва ли кто-то так же страстно, как я, ждал свершения национального переворота этого года (1933). Уже с первых дней я ненавидел грязную революцию 1918 года как измену неполноценной части нашего народа по отношению к другой его части - сильной, нерастраченной, воскресшей в 1914 году, которая могла и хотела иметь будущее. Все, что я написал после этого о политике, было направлено против сил, окопавшихся с помощью наших врагов на вершине нашей нищеты и несчастий для того, чтобы лишить нас будущего. Каждая строка должна была способствовать их падению, и я надеюсь, что так оно и произошло. Что-то должно было наступить в какой-либо форме для того, чтобы освободить глубочайшие инстинкты нашей крови от этого давления, если уж нам выпало участвовать в грядущих решениях мировой истории, а не быть лишь ее жертвами. Большая игра мировой политики еще не завершена. Самые высокие ставки еще не сделаны. Для любого живущего народа речь идет о его величии или уничтожении. Но события этого года дают нам надежду на то, что этот вопрос для нас еще не решен, что мы когда-нибудь вновь - как во времена Бисмарка - станем субъектом, а не только объектом истории. Мы живем в титанические десятилетия. Титанические - значит страшные и несчастные. Величие и счастье не пара, и у нас нет выбора. Никто из ныне живущих где-либо в этом мире не станет счастливым, но многие смогут по собственной воле пройти путь своей жизни в величии или ничтожестве. Однако тот, кто ищет только комфорта, не заслуживает права присутствовать при этом. Часто тот, кто действует, видит недалеко. Он движется без осознания подлинной цели.

Antiquity

Antiquity : from 800 BC to 476 AD

Antiquity : from 800 BC to 476 AD.

Глава 8

Борьба за Красный Петроград. Глава 8

Английский империализм, признавший в числе первых западноевропейских государств национальные новообразования Прибалтики и придерживавшийся в своей внешней политике лозунга расчленения бывшей Российской империи, решил придать демократический оттенок русской контрреволюции на Петроградском фронте. Облачение в демократическую одежду всего белого движения на северо-западе России имело в виду, помимо общих политические соображений, создание единого антисоветского фронта, заключение военного союза прибалтийских государств, в первую очередь Эстонии и Финляндии, с русской белогвардейщиной в лице командования Северо-западной армии. Для того чтобы это соглашение было юридически правомочным и в целях лучшей организации контрреволюции, английский империализм к августу 1919 г. от политики относительной пассивности перешел к непосредственному вмешательству в дела Северо-западной армии. Первым и наиболее классическим актом английского вмешательства в ход гражданской [271] войны на Петроградском фронте было создание русского белогвардейского Северо-западного правительства. Политическое совещание, образованное в Финляндии в качестве совещательного органа при генерале Юдениче, было скомпрометировано своей ярко выраженной и отнюдь не скрываемой монархической программой.

Часть II. Тюрьма

Записки «вредителя». Часть II. Тюрьма

Глава 25

Сквозь ад русской революции. Воспоминания гардемарина. 1914–1919. Глава 25

В августе 1919 года верховное командование красных решило покончить с Северо-западной армией, которая в это время приблизилась на опасное расстояние к Петрограду. На позициях красных за линией фронта наблюдались признаки повышенной активности, пленные сообщали о ежедневном прибытии на фронт свежих красных дивизий. Мы ожидали крупного наступления каждое утро и пытались предотвратить главный удар. Но еще до того, как красные выбрали время для его нанесения, мы получили приказ штаба о всеобщем отступлении. Большинство железнодорожных путей и шоссе между Петроградом и границей Эстонии тянулись по прямой линии с востока на запад, но по каким-то непонятным причинам было приказано оставить главные пути и отступать в юго-западном направлении. Лишь бронепоезда были вынуждены двигаться на запад по основному пути на Ямбург, нам дали указания обеспечивать их свободное прохождение до тех пор, пока последняя воинская часть не перейдет железнодорожное полотно с севера. Во время отступления нервозность всегда достигает апогея, все становится возможным, когда войска перемещаются по проселочным дорогам в стороне от известных им ориентиров. Когда белые пехотинцы отступили за железнодорожные пути, противник совершил рывок вперед вдоль прибрежного шоссе, тянувшегося параллельно железной дороге. На другой день мы все еще находились на расстоянии примерно 50 миль к востоку от Ямбурга и стояли перед угрозой быть отрезанными от своей базы.

9. Не верь следователю

Записки «вредителя». Часть II. Тюрьма. 9. Не верь следователю

Я вернулся в камеру в удрученном состоянии. У следователя я чувствовал больше злобы, чем волнения; оставшись же наедине с самим собой, я не чувствовал твердости. Убьют — несомненно, как убили всех моих друзей. Погибнут жена и сын, потому что у них конфискуют все, а жену сошлют. Так было с семьями «48-ми». Я должен умереть молча, дожидаясь дня, когда вызовут «с вещами», когда поведут коридорами вниз, в подвал, скрутят руки, накинут на голову мешок и кто-нибудь из этих мерзавцев пустит сзади пулю в затылок. Так нет же, не будет этого, не дамся я, как теленок на бойне. Я все обдумал и решил на следующем допросе убить следователя. Оружие, необходимое для этого, было у сидевших со мной в камере уголовных. У них был столовый нож, наточенный так, что они им брились. Был треугольный напильник, которым можно было бы действовать как стилетом, если приделать к нему ручку от ножа. Наконец, был стальной брусок, не менее пятисот граммов весом. Я остановился на этом бруске. Его можно было спрятать в рукав, и он был достаточно тяжел, чтобы одним ударом проломить череп. Промахнуться мне не хотелось. Надо действовать наверняка. Барышников ходил с револьвером в кобуре, но держал себя неосторожно, когда кончал допрос. Он шел мимо меня к вешалке, где висела его шинель и шапка, становился ко мне спиной, когда снимал шинель. Этот момент надо использовать, чтобы нанести удар. Он должен был рухнуть на пол, я мог завладеть револьвером, выскочить в буфет и при удаче успеть застрелить еще двух-трех следователей. Меня убили бы в сумятице и перестрелке. Картина мне представлялась заманчивой. Я наказал бы этого негодяя, из-за которого погиб С. В.

Итог боевой деятельности торпедных катеров

«Шнелльботы». Германские торпедные катера Второй мировой войны. «Шнелльботы» на войне. Итог боевой деятельности торпедных катеров

К началу Второй мировой войны в составе кригсмарине имелось всего 17 торпедных катеров. До декабря 1939 года в строй вошли еще четыре; за 1940, 1941, 1942 и 1943 годы было построено соответственно 20, 30, 36 и 38 «шнелльботов». На 1944 год приходится пик их производства - 65 единиц; еще 14 немцы успели изготовить за четыре месяца 1945-го. Таким образом, общая численность построенных в Германии больших торпедных катеров составляет 220 единиц (не считая малых типа KM, LS и поставленных на экспорт). Потери «шнелльботов» вплоть до 1944 года значительно отставали от их производства. В 1939 году не погибло ни одного катера (лишь S-17 был списан из-за штормовых повреждений); в 1940, 1941 и 1942 годах их убыль составила всего лишь четыре, три и пять единиц соответственно. Хотя в дальнейшем число погибших «шнелльботов» резко увеличилось (19 в 1943-м и 58 в 1944-м), общая их численность в составе ВМС по-прежнему росла. Так, если в декабре 1941 года кригсмарине располагали 57 катерами, то в декабре 1942-го их было 83, в декабре 1943-го - 96 и в декабре 1944-го - 117. Всего за годы войны погибло 112 «шнелльботов». 46 из них были потоплены авиацией, 30 уничтожены кораблями союзников, 18 подорвались на минах; остальные погибли по другим причинам. Кроме того, численность торпедных катеров уменьшилась за счет продажи «шнелльботов» Испании (6 единиц) и их переоборудования в суда других классов (10 единиц). Наиболее эффективно «москиты» использовались в боях в Ла-Манше.

Мезолит

Мезолит : период примерно с 12 000 г. до н.э. по 9 000 г. до н.э.

Мезолит : период примерно с 12 000 г. до н.э. по 9 000 г. до н.э.

Chapter II

The pirates of Panama or The buccaneers of America : Chapter II

A description of Tortuga The fruits and plants there How the French first settled there, at two several times, and forced out the Spaniards The author twice sold in the said island. THE island of Tortuga is situate on the north side of Hispaniola, in 20 deg. 30 min. latitude; its just extent is threescore leagues about. The Spaniards, who gave name to this island, called it so from the shape of the land, in some manner resembling a great sea-tortoise, called by them Tortuga-de-mar. The country is very mountainous, and full of rocks, and yet thick of lofty trees, that grow upon the hardest of those rocks, without partaking of a softer soil. Hence it comes that their roots, for the greatest part, are seen naked, entangled among the rocks like the branching of ivy against our walls. That part of this island which stretches to the north is totally uninhabited: the reason is, first, because it is incommodious, and unhealthy: and, secondly, for the ruggedness of the coast, that gives no access to the shore, unless among rocks almost inaccessible: for this cause it is peopled only on the south part, which hath only one port indifferently good: yet this harbour has two entries, or channels, which afford passage to ships of seventy guns; the port itself being without danger, and capable of receiving a great number of vessels. The inhabited parts, of which the first is called the Low-Lands, or Low-Country: this is the chief among the rest, because it contains the port aforesaid. The town is called Cayona, and here live the chiefest and richest planters of the island.

16. Старожилы

Записки «вредителя». Часть II. Тюрьма. 16. Старожилы

Не стремились к работе только закоренелые старожилы тюрьмы. Их было всего несколько человек, но зато один из них сидел уже более двух лет. Мы, собственно говоря, точно и не знали, почему они сидят так долго и в чем они обвиняются. По-видимому, у одного из них дело безнадежно запуталось из-за перевранной фамилии, и, приговорив его к десяти годам концлагерей, его вернули с Попова острова, то есть с распределительного пункта, но «дело» продолжали тянуть. Других не то забыли, не то перестали ими интересоваться, как запоздавшими и ненужными, и у следователей никак не доходили руки, чтобы решить, наконец, их судьбу. Они же, пережив в свое время все волнения и страхи, тупели и переставали воспринимать что бы то ни было, кроме обыденных тюремных мелочей, заменивших им жизнь. — Фи, еще молодой, фи, еще ничего не знаете, — любил приговаривать один из них, немец, пожилой человек. — Посидите с мое, тогда узнаете. Дфа с половиной гота! Разфе так пол метут! Фот как пол надо мести. И он брал щетку и внушал новичку выработанные им принципы по подметанию пола. Другие наставительно сообщали правила еды умывания, прогулки. Сами они ревниво соблюдали весь выработанный ими ритуал и проводили день со своеобразным вкусом. Вставали они до официального подъема и тщательно, не торопясь, умывались, бесцеремонно брызгая на новичков, спящих на полу. Затем аккуратно свертывали постель и поднимали койки, точно рассчитывая окончить эту процедуру к моменту общего подъема. В начинавшейся суматохе, давке, очередях они стояли в стороне, со старательно скрученной цигаркой в самодельном мундштучке. К еде они относились с особым вкусом.

718 - 843

From 718 to 843

High Early Middle Ages. From the beginning of Charles Martel's rule in 718 to the Treaty of Verdun in 843.