Chapter XVIII


Captain Morgan sends canoes and boats to the South Sea
He fires the city of Panama
Robberies and cruelties committed there by the pirates, till their return to the Castle of Chagre.


CAPTAIN MORGAN, as soon as he had placed necessary guards at several quarters within and without the city, commanded twenty-five men to seize a great boat, which had stuck in the mud of the port, for want of water, at a low tide. The same day about noon, he caused fire privately to be set to several great edifices of the city, nobody knowing who were the authors thereof, much less on what motives Captain Morgan did it, which are unknown to this day: the fire increased so, that before night the greatest part of the city was in a flame. Captain Morgan pretended the Spaniards had done it, perceiving that his own people reflected on him for that action. Many of the Spaniards, and some of the pirates, did what they could, either to quench the flame, or, by blowing up houses with gunpowder, and pulling down others, to stop it, but in vain: for in less than half an hour it consumed a whole street. All the houses of the city were built with cedar, very curious and magnificent, and richly adorned, especially with hangings and paintings, whereof part were before removed, and another great part were consumed by fire.

There were in this city (which is the see of a bishop) eight monasteries, seven for men, and one for women; two stately churches, and one hospital. The churches and monasteries were all richly adorned with altar-pieces and paintings, much gold and silver, and other precious things, all which the ecclesiastics had hidden. Besides which, here were two thousand houses of magnificent building, the greatest part inhabited by merchants vastly rich. For the rest of less quality, and tradesmen, this city contained five thousand more. Here were also many stables for the horses and mules that carry the plate of the king of Spain, as well as private men, towards the North Sea. The neighbouring fields are full of fertile plantations and pleasant gardens, affording delicious prospects to the inhabitants all the year.

The Genoese had in this city a stately house for their trade of negroes. This likewise was by Captain Morgan burnt to the very ground. Besides which building, there were consumed two hundred warehouses, and many slaves, who had hid themselves therein, with innumerable sacks of meal; the fire of which continued four weeks after it had begun. The greatest part of the pirates still encamped without the city, fearing and expecting the Spaniards would come and fight them anew, it being known they much outnumbered the pirates. This made them keep the field, to preserve their forces united, now much diminished by their losses. Their wounded, which were many, they put into one church, which remained standing, the rest being consumed by the fire. Besides these decreases of their men, Captain Morgan had sent a convoy of one hundred and fifty men to the castle of Chagre, to carry the news of his victory at Panama.

They saw often whole troops of Spaniards run to and fro in the fields, which made them suspect their rallying, which they never had the courage to do. In the afternoon Captain Morgan re-entered the city with his troops, that every one might take up their lodgings, which now they could hardly find, few houses having escaped the fire. Then they sought very carefully among the ruins and ashes, for utensils of plate or gold, that were not quite wasted by the flames: and of such they found no small number, especially in wells and cisterns, where the Spaniards had hid them.

Next day Captain Morgan dispatched away two troops, of one hundred and fifty men each, stout and well armed, to seek for the inhabitants who were escaped. These having made several excursions up and down the fields, woods, and mountains adjacent, returned after two days, bringing above two hundred prisoners, men, women, and slaves. The same day returned also the boat which Captain Morgan had sent to the South Sea, bringing three other boats which they had taken. But all these prizes they could willingly have given, and greater labour into the bargain, for one galleon, which miraculously escaped, richly laden with all the king's plate, jewels, and other precious goods of the best and richest merchants of Panama: on board which were also the religious women of the nunnery, who had embarked with them all the ornaments of their church, consisting in much gold, plate, and other things of great value.

The strength of this galleon was inconsiderable, having only seven guns, and ten or twelve muskets, and very ill provided with victuals, necessaries, and fresh water, having no more sails than the uppermost of the mainmast. This account the pirates received from some one who had spoken with seven mariners belonging to the galleon, who came ashore in the cockboat for fresh water. Hence they concluded they might easily have taken it, had they given her chase, as they should have done; but they were impeded from following this vastly rich prize, by their gluttony and drunkenness, having plentifully debauched themselves with several rich wines they found ready, choosing rather to satiate their appetites than to lay hold on such huge advantage; since this only prize would have been of far greater value than all they got at Panama, and the places thereabout. Next day, repenting of their negligence, being weary of their vices and debaucheries, they set forth another boat, well armed, to pursue with all speed the said galleon; but in vain, the Spaniards who were on board having had intelligence of their own danger one or two days before, while the pirates were cruising so near them; whereupon they fled to places more remote and unknown.

The pirates found, in the ports of the island of Tavoga and Tavogilla, several boats laden with very good merchandise; all which they took, and brought to Panama, where they made an exact relation of all that had passed to Captain Morgan. The prisoners confirmed what the pirates said, adding, that they undoubtedly knew where the galleon might then be, but that it was very probable they had been relieved before now from other places. This stirred up Captain Morgan anew, to send forth all the boats in the port of Panama to seek the said galleon till they could find her. These boats, being in all four, after eight days' cruising to and fro, and searching several ports and creeks, lost all hopes of finding her: hereupon they returned to Tavoga and Tavogilla; here they found a reasonable good ship newly come from Payta, laden with cloth, soap, sugar, and biscuit, with 20,000 pieces of eight; this they instantly seized, without the least resistance; as also a boat which was not far off, on which they laded great part of the merchandises from the ship, with some slaves. With this purchase they returned to Panama, somewhat better satisfied; yet, withal, much discontented that they could not meet with the galleon.

The convoy which Captain Morgan had sent to the castle of Chagre returned much about the same time, bringing with them very good news; for while Captain Morgan was on his journey to Panama, those he had left in the castle of Chagre had sent for two boats to cruise. These met with a Spanish ship, which they chased within sight of the castle. This being perceived by the pirates in the castle, they put forth Spanish colours, to deceive the ship that fled before the boats; and the poor Spaniards, thinking to take refuge under the castle, were caught in a snare, and made prisoners. The cargo on board the said vessel consisted in victuals and provisions, than which nothing could be more opportune for the castle, where they began already to want things of this kind.

This good luck of those of Chagre caused Captain Morgan to stay longer at Panama, ordering several new excursions into the country round about; and while the pirates at Panama were upon these expeditions, those at Chagre were busy in piracies on the North Sea. Captain Morgan sent forth, daily, parties of two hundred men, to make inroads into all the country round about; and when one party came back, another went forth, who soon gathered much riches, and many prisoners. These being brought into the city, were put to the most exquisite tortures, to make them confess both other people's goods and their own. Here it happened that one poor wretch was found in the house of a person of quality, who had put on, amidst the confusion, a pair of taffety breeches of his master's, with a little silver key hanging out; perceiving which, they asked him for the cabinet of the said key. His answer was, he knew not what was become of it, but that finding those breeches in his master's house, he had made bold to wear them. Not being able to get any other answer, they put him on the rack, and inhumanly disjointed his arms; then they twisted a cord about his forehead, which they wrung so hard that his eyes appeared as big as eggs, and were ready to fall out. But with these torments not obtaining any positive answer, they hung him up by the wrists, giving him many blows and stripes under that intolerable pain and posture of body. Afterwards they cut off his nose and ears, and singed his face with burning straw, till he could not speak, nor lament his misery any longer: then, losing all hopes of any confession, they bade a negro run him through, which put an end to his life, and to their inhuman tortures. Thus did many others of those miserable prisoners finish their days, the common sport and recreation of these pirates being such tragedies.

Captain Morgan having now been at Panama full three weeks, commanded all things to be prepared for his departure. He ordered every company of men to seek so many beasts of carriage as might convey the spoil to the river where his canoes lay. About this time there was a great rumour, that a considerable number of pirates intended to leave Captain Morgan; and that, taking a ship then in port, they determined to go and rob on the South Sea, till they had got as much as they thought fit, and then return homewards, by way of the East Indies. For which purpose they had gathered much provisions, which they had hid in private places, with sufficient powder, bullets, and all other ammunition: likewise some great guns belonging to the town, muskets, and other things, wherewith they designed not only to equip their vessel, but to fortify themselves in some island which might serve them for a place of refuge.

This design had certainly taken effect, had not Captain Morgan had timely advice of it from one of their comrades: hereupon he commanded the mainmast of the said ship to be cut down and burnt, with all the other boats in the port: hereby the intentions of all or most of his companions were totally frustrated. Then Captain Morgan sent many of the Spaniards into the adjoining fields and country to seek for money, to ransom not only themselves, but the rest of the prisoners, as likewise the ecclesiastics. Moreover, he commanded all the artillery of the town to be nailed and stopped up. At the same time he sent out a strong company of men to seek for the governor of Panama, of whom intelligence was brought, that he had laid several ambuscades in the way by which he ought to return: but they returned soon after, saying they had not found any sign of any such ambuscades. For confirmation whereof, they brought some prisoners, who declared that the said governor had had an intention of making some opposition by the way, but that the men designed to effect it were unwilling to undertake it: so that for want of means he could not put his design in execution.

February 24, 1671, Captain Morgan departed from Panama, or rather from the place where the city of Panama stood; of the spoils whereof he carried with him one hundred and seventy-five beasts of carriage, laden with silver, gold, and other precious things, beside about six hundred prisoners, men, women, children and slaves. That day they came to a river that passes through a delicious plain, a league from Panama: here Captain Morgan put all his forces into good order, so as that the prisoners were in the middle, surrounded on all sides with pirates, where nothing else was to be heard but lamentations, cries, shrieks, and doleful sighs of so many women and children, who feared Captain Morgan designed to transport them all into his own country for slaves. Besides, all those miserable prisoners endured extreme hunger and thirst at that time, which misery Captain Morgan designedly caused them to sustain, to excite them to seek for money to ransom themselves, according to the tax he had set upon every one. Many of the women begged Captain Morgan, on their knees, with infinite sighs and tears, to let them return to Panama, there to live with their dear husbands and children in little huts of straw, which they would erect, seeing they had no houses till the rebuilding of the city. But his answer was, "He came not thither to hear lamentations and cries, but to seek money: therefore they ought first to seek out that, wherever it was to be had, and bring it to him; otherwise he would assuredly transport them all to such places whither they cared not to go."

Next day, when the march began, those lamentable cries and shrieks were renewed, so as it would have caused compassion in the hardest heart: but Captain Morgan, as a man little given to mercy, was not moved in the least. They marched in the same order as before, one party of the pirates in the van, the prisoners in the middle, and the rest of the pirates in the rear; by whom the miserable Spaniards were at every step punched and thrust in their backs and sides, with the blunt ends of their arms, to make them march faster.

A beautiful lady, wife to one of the richest merchants of Tavoga, was led prisoner by herself, between two pirates. Her lamentations pierced the skies, seeing herself carried away into captivity often crying to the pirates, and telling them, "That she had given orders to two religious persons, in whom she had relied, to go to a certain place, and fetch so much money as her ransom did amount to; that they had promised faithfully to do it, but having obtained the money, instead of bringing it to her, they had employed it another way, to ransom some of their own, and particular friends." This ill action of theirs was discovered by a slave, who brought a letter to the said lady. Her complaints, and the cause thereof, being brought to Captain Morgan, he thought fit to inquire thereinto. Having found it to be true—especially hearing it confirmed by the confession of the said religious men, though under some frivolous exercises of having diverted the money but for a day or two, in which time they expected more sums to repay it—he gave liberty to the said lady, whom otherwise he designed to transport to Jamaica. But he detained the said religious men as prisoners in her place, using them according to their deserts.

Captain Morgan arriving at the town called Cruz, on the banks of the river Chagre, he published an order among the prisoners, that within three days every one should bring in their ransom, under the penalty of being transported to Jamaica. Meanwhile he gave orders for so much rice and maize to be collected thereabouts, as was necessary for victualling his ships. Here some of the prisoners were ransomed, but many others could not bring in their money. Hereupon he continued his voyage, leaving the village on the 5th of March following, carrying with him all the spoil he could. Hence he likewise led away some new prisoners, inhabitants there, with those in Panama, who had not paid their ransoms. But the two religious men, who had diverted the lady's money, were ransomed three days after by other persons, who had more compassion for them than they had showed for her.

About the middle of the way to Chagre, Captain Morgan commanded them to be mustered, and caused every one to be sworn, that they had concealed nothing, even not to the value of sixpence. This done, Captain Morgan knowing those lewd fellows would not stick to swear falsely for interest, he commanded every one to be searched very strictly, both in their clothes and satchels, and elsewhere. Yea, that this order might not be ill taken by his companions, he permitted himself to be searched, even to his very shoes. To this effect, by common consent, one was assigned out of every company to be searchers of the rest. The French pirates that assisted on this expedition disliked this new practice of searching; but, being outnumbered by the English, they were forced to submit as well as the rest. The search being over, they re-embarked, and arrived at the castle of Chagre on the 9th of March. Here they found all things in good order, excepting the wounded men whom they had left at their departure; for of these the greatest number were dead of their wounds.

From Chagre, Captain Morgan sent, presently after his arrival, a great boat to Puerto Bello, with all the prisoners taken at the isle of St. Catherine, demanding of them a considerable ransom for the castle of Chagre, where he then was; threatening otherwise to ruin it. To this those of Puerto Bello answered, they would not give one farthing towards the ransom of the said castle, and the English might do with it as they pleased. Hereupon the dividend was made of all the spoil made in that voyage; every company, and every particular person therein, receiving their proportion, or rather what part thereof Captain Morgan pleased to give them. For the rest of his companions, even of his own nation, murmured at his proceedings, and told him to his face that he had reserved the best jewels to himself: for they judged it impossible that no greater share should belong to them than two hundred pieces of eight, per capita, of so many valuable plunders they had made; which small sum they thought too little for so much labour, and such dangers, as they had been exposed to. But Captain Morgan was deaf to all this, and many other like complaints, having designed to cheat them of what he could.

At last, finding himself obnoxious to many censures of his people, and fearing the consequence, he thought it unsafe to stay any longer at Chagre, but ordered the ordnance of the castle to be carried on board his ship; then he caused most of the walls to be demolished, the edifices to be burnt, and as many other things ruined as could be done in a short time. This done, he went secretly on board his own ship, without giving any notice to his companions, and put out to sea, being only followed by three or four vessels of the whole fleet. These were such (as the French pirates believed) as went shares with Captain Morgan in the best part of the spoil, which had been concealed from them in the dividend. The Frenchmen could willingly have revenged themselves on Captain Morgan and his followers, had they been able to encounter him at sea; but they were destitute of necessaries, and had much ado to find sufficient provisions for their voyage to Jamaica, he having left them unprovided for all things.

THE END

12. Первые аресты в Мурманске. Отворите! Это ГПУ

Записки «вредителя». Часть I. Время террора. 12. Первые аресты в Мурманске. Отворите! Это ГПУ

Моя квартирка, считавшаяся по Мурманску хорошей, потому что дом был построен несколько лет назад, с его стен не текла вода, под ним не росла плесень и грибы, — все же была далека от благоустройства: печи дымили так, что при топке надо было открывать настежь двери и окна; в полу были такие щели, что если зимой случалось расплескать на полу воду, она замерзала; уборная была холодная, без воды; переборки между моей квартирой и соседними, где ютилось несколько семей служащих треста, были так тонки, что все было слышно. В моей квартире, как и в других, была одна комната и крохотная кухня. Все мое имущество состояло из дивана, на котором я спал, двух столов, трех стульев и полки с книгами. Семья моя жила в Петербурге, и сидеть одному в такой комнате было невыносимо тоскливо, особенно по вечерам. Выл ветер, стучала в деревянную обшивку дома обледеневшая веревка, протянутая для сушки белья; и все казалось, что кто-то подходит к дому и стучится. Когда было морозно и тихо, в небе играли сполохи — северное сияние; точно в ответ им начинали гудеть электрические провода, то тихо и однотонно, то постепенно усиливаясь и переходя словно в рев парохода. Это действовало на нервы и вызывало бессонницу. В конце марта в одну из таких ночей я услышал стук и шаги. «Верно, что-нибудь на пристани случилось и матросы идут будить помощника, заведующего траловым флотом. Никогда нет этому человеку покоя, ни днем, ни ночью». Прислушался — да, так. Стучат к нему. Прошло часа два. Кто-то резко постучал в мою дверь. Вставать не хотелось: наверно, по ошибке или пьяный матрос забрел не туда. Нет, стучат.

VII. «Мягкий камушек»

Побег из ГУЛАГа. Часть 3. VII. «Мягкий камушек»

Наконец, мы наткнулись на маленькую котловину, защищенную, как крепость, выпирающими из земли гранитами. В глубине лежало крохотное озерко. Черная, мертвая вода стояла в нем, как замершая; около лежал гранит, плоский, похожий на стол. — Больше не могу, — вырвалось у меня. — Спать хочу так, что ноги не держат, — и я повалилась на гранит ничком, закрывшись с головой пальто. Я не уснула, а словно потеряла сознание или погрузилась в воду, около которой лежала. Мне было темно и спокойно до бесчувствия. Снилось, что я, на самом деле, лежу на дне, а надо мной стоит тяжелая вода и гудит, как отзвонившие колокола. Последние сутки у меня не было ни минуты сна, и этот отдых казался волшебным. Я очнулась от шепота около меня. Отец и сын собирали чай в ямке рядом с камнем, на котором я лежала. В котелке была горячая вода, в кружке заварен чай, на сухари положены кусочки сала. Шел четвертый день пути, мы прошли километров семьдесят — восемьдесят по карте и накрутили по горам и оврагам еще километров сорок, а чай пили только второй раз. Он казался необычайно вкусным, живительным, чудесным, но, чтобы решиться вскипятить его, нужно было найти особенно потаенное место и греть его исключительно на бересте, чтоб совершенно не было дыма. Солнце стояло высоко, небо было легкое, голубое; в котловинке, у озерка, было спокойно, как в неприступной крепости. Казалось, что, уйдя из опасной долины, мы разделались с погоней, которой немыслимо будет угадать, куда мы свернули, и напасть на наш след. — Мама, твой камушек, наверное, мягкий? — дразнил сын. — Мягкий.

Глава 3. Балтийские «касатки» в войне на Хвалынском море (1919-1920 гг.) [61]

Короли подплава в море червонных валетов. Часть I. Советский подплав в период Гражданской войны (1918–1920 гг.). Глава 3. Балтийские «касатки» в войне на Хвалынском море (1919-1920 гг.)

Волжскую военную флотилию (ВВФ) сформировали во время Гражданской войны в бассейне р. Волги и на акватории северной части Каспийского моря, где она действовала в период с июня 1918 г. по самый конец июля 1919 г. Из ее состава в октябре 1918 г. выделилась Астрахано-Каспийская военная флотилия (АКВФ). Главной [62] базой АКВФ стала Астрахань. Находясь в составе 11-й армии, вяло проводившей операции в северной части Каспия, АКВФ осуществляла ее поддержку с моря и защиту дельты р. Волги. Как и везде на всех фронтах, сил и средств для ведения боевых действий не хватало, и высшее руководство молодой Советской Республики распорядилось направить на Каспий боевые корабли с Балтики. Среди них оказались и 4 малые подводные лодки: три лодки типа «Касатка» — сама «Касатка», «Макрель» и «Окунь» и еще одна — уникальная «Минога». Если бы политики лучше учились в гимназии или, по крайней мере, посоветовались со спецами, то подводные лодки оставили бы тогда в покое. Вот что говорится о северном Каспии в Военной энциклопедии издания 1912 г.: «Каспийское море (Хвалынское), величайшее на земном шаре озеро, остаток «Сарматского моря», которое вместе с Черным и Каспийским морями покрывало в начале третичного периода весь юг России. Этот обширный бассейн представляет чрезвычайное разнообразие в климатическом и физическом отношениях. В гидрографическом отношении Каспийское море линией устье р. Терек — п-ов Мангышлак{6} делится на два обособленных бассейна.

22. Безысходное

Записки «вредителя». Часть II. Тюрьма. 22. Безысходное

В «Крестах» время шло, как на Шпалерной, но многие попадали сюда к концу следствия и вскоре уходили на этап. Так ушел наш профессор, получив десять лет концлагерей. На его место посадили военного летчика, совсем еще молодого человека. Откупившегося Ивана Ивановича сменил один из служащих Академии наук. Все шло как-то уже по-обычному, и людские драмы волновали, может быть, меньше, чем в первое время, когда раз ночью к нам втолкнули в камеру нового заключенного, судьба которого нас потрясла своей безысходностью. Это был совсем молодой человек. Вид у него был ужасный. Одежда изорвана так, как после схватки, руки дрожали, глаза блуждали. Он был в таком страшном возбуждении, что никого не видел и ничего не замечал вокруг. Вещи свои он беспомощно выронил из рук, затем пытался ходить по камере, хотя пол был занят нашими телами. Потом остановился в углу у двери, хватаясь за голову и бормоча несвязные слова. — Сорок восемь часов... Через сорок восемь часов расстрел. Конец. Выхода нет. Куда мне деваться? Он метался, как в предсмертной тоске. Мы предлагали ему сесть на койку, устроить как-нибудь вещи, выпить воды, но он не слышал и не замечал нас, видя перед собой только свое. Наконец, на вопрос кого-то из нас, откуда он, кто он, он обратился к нам и стал неудержимо говорить, рассказывая о себе и пытаясь хотя бы нас заставить понять то невероятное, нелепое стечение обстоятельств, которое его губило. — Вы понимаете, — говорил он, — я — истерик. С болезненной фантазией, с манией выдумывать необыкновенные истории.

1. Введение

Записки «вредителя». Часть I. Время террора. 1. Введение

Моя судьба — обыкновенная история русского ученого, специалиста, — общая судьба вообще культурных людей в СССР. Какой бы тяжкой ни казалась моя личная судьба, она легче судьбы большинства: мне пришлось меньше вытерпеть на допросе и «следствии»; мой приговор — пять лет каторжных работ, значительно легче обычного — расстрела или десяти лет. Многие люди, которые подвергались пыткам и казни, были старше меня и имели гораздо большее значение в науке, чем я. Вина у нас была одна: превосходство культуры, которое нам не могли простить большевики. Я говорю о себе только потому, что другие говорить не могут: молча должны они умирать от пули чекиста, идти в ссылку без надежды вернуться и также молча умирать. Я бежал с каторги, рискуя жизнью жены и сына. Без оружия, без теплой одежды, в ужасной обуви, почти без пищи. Мы пересекли морской залив в дырявой лодке, заплатанной моими руками. Прошли сотни верст. Без компаса и карты, далеко за полярным кругом, дикими горами, лесами и страшными болотами. Судьба помогла мне бежать, и она накладывает на меня долг говорить от лица тех, кто погиб молча.

VIII. Тоже Кемь

Побег из ГУЛАГа. Часть 2. VIII. Тоже Кемь

Дома, в той избе, которая нам дала приют и которую я вспомню с благодарностью в смертный час, я опять села на лавку у окна. Не умею передать того, что со мной делалось; каторга вызывала во мне большее возмущение, чем тюрьма. Все, что я видела, врезалось в душу, и хотелось узнать еще больше, до самой глубины горя и унижения, чтобы понять, где же конец. По улице погнали партию молодых еще, но до крайности истомленных людей. Лица их были серы, как бесплодная земля, голова, плечи, руки опущены, как под непомерной тяжестью, хотя за плечами у них были только жалкие, полупустые холщовые мешки. Кругом шли конвойные с карабинами наперевес. — На Белбалтлаг гонют, — вздохнула старуха, подсевшая ко мне на лавку. — Спаси, Господи, спаси и сохрани, и помилуй души наши, — говорила она, крестя их в окно мелкими крестиками. — Выживет ли кто? Каждый день гонют и гонют, а и казарм-то нету, струменту-то нету; землю, сказывут, деревянными лопатами роют, а морозец-то захватывает, как камень. Как мороз закрепчает, так и сами померзнут. Завидуют многие. Позавидуешь и смерти с жизни такой. — Скажи ты мне, бабонька, — обратилась она ко мне, — может, ты ученая какая, откуда така жизнь завелась? Я ничего не ответила. Что я могла сказать этой женщине, которая всю жизнь прошла честно, чисто, правдиво? — Не знаешь? — спросила она. — Нет. — То-то, не знаешь. Кого ни спрошу — никто не знает. Кабы знатье, может, и помог бы кто. Старухи бают, дьявол это путает, а смекаю — от людей это. Иной человек хуже нечистого.

Chapter XVIII

The voyage of the Beagle. Chapter XVIII. Tahiti and New Zealand

Pass through the Low Archipelago Tahiti Aspect Vegetation on the Mountains View of Eimeo Excursion into the Interior Profound Ravines Succession of Waterfalls Number of wild useful Plants Temperance of the Inhabitants Their moral state Parliament convened New Zealand Bay of Islands Hippahs Excursion to Waimate Missionary Establishment English Weeds now run wild Waiomio Funeral of a New Zealand Woman Sail for Australia OCTOBER 20th.—The survey of the Galapagos Archipelago being concluded, we steered towards Tahiti and commenced our long passage of 3200 miles. In the course of a few days we sailed out of the gloomy and clouded ocean-district which extends during the winter far from the coast of South America. We then enjoyed bright and clear weather, while running pleasantly along at the rate of 150 or 160 miles a day before the steady trade-wind. The temperature in this more central part of the Pacific is higher than near the American shore. The thermometer in the poop cabin, by night and day, ranged between 80 and 83 degs., which feels very pleasant; but with one degree or two higher, the heat becomes oppressive. We passed through the Low or Dangerous Archipelago, and saw several of those most curious rings of coral land, just rising above the water's edge, which have been called Lagoon Islands.

Глава XVIII

Путешествие натуралиста вокруг света на корабле «Бигль». Глава XVIII. Таити и Новая Зеландия

Переход через Низменный архипелаг Таити. Вид на остров Горная растительность Вид на Эимео Экскурсия в глубь острова Глубокие ущелья Ряд водопадов Множество полезных дикорастущих растений Трезвость жителей Состояние их нравственности Созыв парламента Новая Зеландия Бухта Айлендс. Хиппа Экскурсия в Уаимате Хозяйство миссионеров Английские сорняки, ныне одичавшие Уаиомио Похороны новозеландки Отплытие в Австралию 20 октября. — Закончив съемку Галапагосского архипелага, мы направились на Таити и начали длинный переход в 3 200 миль. Через несколько дней мы вышли из облачной и сумрачной области океана, простирающейся зимой на большое расстояние от побережья Южной Америки. Теперь мы наслаждались солнечной, ясной погодой и, подгоняемые постоянным пассатом, весело плыли со скоростью 150—160 миль в день. Температура в этой области Тихого океана, лежащей ближе к его центру, выше, чем близ американских берегов. Термометр на юте днем и ночью колебался между 27 и 28°, и это было очень приятно; но уже одним-двумя градусами выше жара становится невыносимой. Мы прошли через Низменный, или Опасный, архипелаг и видели несколько тех любопытнейших колец из коралловой почвы, чуть возвышающихся над водой, которым дали название лагунных островов. Над длинной, ослепительно белой береговой полосой тянется зеленая полоса растительности; уходя в обе стороны, полосы быстро суживаются вдали и теряются за горизонтом. С верхушки-мачты внутри кольца видно обширное пространство спокойной воды.

29. Почему Рустем Слободин замёрз первым?

Перевал Дятлова. Смерть, идущая по следу... 29. Почему Рустем Слободин замёрз первым?

Рустем Слободин был не только хорошим спортсменом. Он был ещё и рисковым парнем. Летом 1958 г. Рустем вместе с отцом совершил пешеходный переход из города Фрунзе (нынешний Бишкек) в Андижан. Этот 300-километровй поход проходил по горной малонаселённой местности (западный Тянь-Шань), причём эпитет "малонаселённый" в данном случае является синонимом слова "опасный". Чем менее населена местность, тем опаснее случайные встречи. Особенно, когда этническим русским путшественникам доводится встречаться с киргизами, уйгурами, узбеками, дунганами и представителями иных, весьма непохожих на них своею ментальностью, народов. Про интернационализм и братство трудящихся вспоминать во время таких встречь, конечно, можно, но нож и топор желательно всегда держать под рукою - эти доводы всегда оказываются весомее упомянутых "интернационализма" и "братства". Автор прекрасно осведомлён о специфических проявлениях "братства народов" в условиях СССР, поскольку имел счастье обучаться три года в одном классе с казахскими детьми, которые искренне ненавидели русских только за то, что у тех не было блох. Было это лет на 20 позже похода Слободиных по западному Тянь-Шаню, но даже в конце "золотых" 70-х казахские дети вовсю совокуплялись с ослицами под одобрительные выкрики старших. Автор наблюдал подобные сцены неоднократно и потому ясно понимает, что Рустема Слободина и диких жителей Тянь-Шаня летом 1958 г. разделяла не просто ментальность - между ними лежала настоящая цивилизационная пропасть. Русских не то, чтобы ненавидели - эпитет этот слишком одномерен и не передаёт всей специфики межнациональных отношений - русским просто завидовали за их белую кожу, запах мыла и за то, что у них не было блох.

Eneolithic

Eneolithic : from 5000 to 3300 BC

Eneolithic : from 5000 to 3300 BC.

16. Старожилы

Записки «вредителя». Часть II. Тюрьма. 16. Старожилы

Не стремились к работе только закоренелые старожилы тюрьмы. Их было всего несколько человек, но зато один из них сидел уже более двух лет. Мы, собственно говоря, точно и не знали, почему они сидят так долго и в чем они обвиняются. По-видимому, у одного из них дело безнадежно запуталось из-за перевранной фамилии, и, приговорив его к десяти годам концлагерей, его вернули с Попова острова, то есть с распределительного пункта, но «дело» продолжали тянуть. Других не то забыли, не то перестали ими интересоваться, как запоздавшими и ненужными, и у следователей никак не доходили руки, чтобы решить, наконец, их судьбу. Они же, пережив в свое время все волнения и страхи, тупели и переставали воспринимать что бы то ни было, кроме обыденных тюремных мелочей, заменивших им жизнь. — Фи, еще молодой, фи, еще ничего не знаете, — любил приговаривать один из них, немец, пожилой человек. — Посидите с мое, тогда узнаете. Дфа с половиной гота! Разфе так пол метут! Фот как пол надо мести. И он брал щетку и внушал новичку выработанные им принципы по подметанию пола. Другие наставительно сообщали правила еды умывания, прогулки. Сами они ревниво соблюдали весь выработанный ими ритуал и проводили день со своеобразным вкусом. Вставали они до официального подъема и тщательно, не торопясь, умывались, бесцеремонно брызгая на новичков, спящих на полу. Затем аккуратно свертывали постель и поднимали койки, точно рассчитывая окончить эту процедуру к моменту общего подъема. В начинавшейся суматохе, давке, очередях они стояли в стороне, со старательно скрученной цигаркой в самодельном мундштучке. К еде они относились с особым вкусом.

Upper Paleolithic

Upper Paleolithic : from 50 000 years before present to 12 000 BC

Upper Paleolithic : from 50 000 years before present to 12 000 BC.