Chapter XVIII


Captain Morgan sends canoes and boats to the South Sea
He fires the city of Panama
Robberies and cruelties committed there by the pirates, till their return to the Castle of Chagre.


CAPTAIN MORGAN, as soon as he had placed necessary guards at several quarters within and without the city, commanded twenty-five men to seize a great boat, which had stuck in the mud of the port, for want of water, at a low tide. The same day about noon, he caused fire privately to be set to several great edifices of the city, nobody knowing who were the authors thereof, much less on what motives Captain Morgan did it, which are unknown to this day: the fire increased so, that before night the greatest part of the city was in a flame. Captain Morgan pretended the Spaniards had done it, perceiving that his own people reflected on him for that action. Many of the Spaniards, and some of the pirates, did what they could, either to quench the flame, or, by blowing up houses with gunpowder, and pulling down others, to stop it, but in vain: for in less than half an hour it consumed a whole street. All the houses of the city were built with cedar, very curious and magnificent, and richly adorned, especially with hangings and paintings, whereof part were before removed, and another great part were consumed by fire.

There were in this city (which is the see of a bishop) eight monasteries, seven for men, and one for women; two stately churches, and one hospital. The churches and monasteries were all richly adorned with altar-pieces and paintings, much gold and silver, and other precious things, all which the ecclesiastics had hidden. Besides which, here were two thousand houses of magnificent building, the greatest part inhabited by merchants vastly rich. For the rest of less quality, and tradesmen, this city contained five thousand more. Here were also many stables for the horses and mules that carry the plate of the king of Spain, as well as private men, towards the North Sea. The neighbouring fields are full of fertile plantations and pleasant gardens, affording delicious prospects to the inhabitants all the year.

The Genoese had in this city a stately house for their trade of negroes. This likewise was by Captain Morgan burnt to the very ground. Besides which building, there were consumed two hundred warehouses, and many slaves, who had hid themselves therein, with innumerable sacks of meal; the fire of which continued four weeks after it had begun. The greatest part of the pirates still encamped without the city, fearing and expecting the Spaniards would come and fight them anew, it being known they much outnumbered the pirates. This made them keep the field, to preserve their forces united, now much diminished by their losses. Their wounded, which were many, they put into one church, which remained standing, the rest being consumed by the fire. Besides these decreases of their men, Captain Morgan had sent a convoy of one hundred and fifty men to the castle of Chagre, to carry the news of his victory at Panama.

They saw often whole troops of Spaniards run to and fro in the fields, which made them suspect their rallying, which they never had the courage to do. In the afternoon Captain Morgan re-entered the city with his troops, that every one might take up their lodgings, which now they could hardly find, few houses having escaped the fire. Then they sought very carefully among the ruins and ashes, for utensils of plate or gold, that were not quite wasted by the flames: and of such they found no small number, especially in wells and cisterns, where the Spaniards had hid them.

Next day Captain Morgan dispatched away two troops, of one hundred and fifty men each, stout and well armed, to seek for the inhabitants who were escaped. These having made several excursions up and down the fields, woods, and mountains adjacent, returned after two days, bringing above two hundred prisoners, men, women, and slaves. The same day returned also the boat which Captain Morgan had sent to the South Sea, bringing three other boats which they had taken. But all these prizes they could willingly have given, and greater labour into the bargain, for one galleon, which miraculously escaped, richly laden with all the king's plate, jewels, and other precious goods of the best and richest merchants of Panama: on board which were also the religious women of the nunnery, who had embarked with them all the ornaments of their church, consisting in much gold, plate, and other things of great value.

The strength of this galleon was inconsiderable, having only seven guns, and ten or twelve muskets, and very ill provided with victuals, necessaries, and fresh water, having no more sails than the uppermost of the mainmast. This account the pirates received from some one who had spoken with seven mariners belonging to the galleon, who came ashore in the cockboat for fresh water. Hence they concluded they might easily have taken it, had they given her chase, as they should have done; but they were impeded from following this vastly rich prize, by their gluttony and drunkenness, having plentifully debauched themselves with several rich wines they found ready, choosing rather to satiate their appetites than to lay hold on such huge advantage; since this only prize would have been of far greater value than all they got at Panama, and the places thereabout. Next day, repenting of their negligence, being weary of their vices and debaucheries, they set forth another boat, well armed, to pursue with all speed the said galleon; but in vain, the Spaniards who were on board having had intelligence of their own danger one or two days before, while the pirates were cruising so near them; whereupon they fled to places more remote and unknown.

The pirates found, in the ports of the island of Tavoga and Tavogilla, several boats laden with very good merchandise; all which they took, and brought to Panama, where they made an exact relation of all that had passed to Captain Morgan. The prisoners confirmed what the pirates said, adding, that they undoubtedly knew where the galleon might then be, but that it was very probable they had been relieved before now from other places. This stirred up Captain Morgan anew, to send forth all the boats in the port of Panama to seek the said galleon till they could find her. These boats, being in all four, after eight days' cruising to and fro, and searching several ports and creeks, lost all hopes of finding her: hereupon they returned to Tavoga and Tavogilla; here they found a reasonable good ship newly come from Payta, laden with cloth, soap, sugar, and biscuit, with 20,000 pieces of eight; this they instantly seized, without the least resistance; as also a boat which was not far off, on which they laded great part of the merchandises from the ship, with some slaves. With this purchase they returned to Panama, somewhat better satisfied; yet, withal, much discontented that they could not meet with the galleon.

The convoy which Captain Morgan had sent to the castle of Chagre returned much about the same time, bringing with them very good news; for while Captain Morgan was on his journey to Panama, those he had left in the castle of Chagre had sent for two boats to cruise. These met with a Spanish ship, which they chased within sight of the castle. This being perceived by the pirates in the castle, they put forth Spanish colours, to deceive the ship that fled before the boats; and the poor Spaniards, thinking to take refuge under the castle, were caught in a snare, and made prisoners. The cargo on board the said vessel consisted in victuals and provisions, than which nothing could be more opportune for the castle, where they began already to want things of this kind.

This good luck of those of Chagre caused Captain Morgan to stay longer at Panama, ordering several new excursions into the country round about; and while the pirates at Panama were upon these expeditions, those at Chagre were busy in piracies on the North Sea. Captain Morgan sent forth, daily, parties of two hundred men, to make inroads into all the country round about; and when one party came back, another went forth, who soon gathered much riches, and many prisoners. These being brought into the city, were put to the most exquisite tortures, to make them confess both other people's goods and their own. Here it happened that one poor wretch was found in the house of a person of quality, who had put on, amidst the confusion, a pair of taffety breeches of his master's, with a little silver key hanging out; perceiving which, they asked him for the cabinet of the said key. His answer was, he knew not what was become of it, but that finding those breeches in his master's house, he had made bold to wear them. Not being able to get any other answer, they put him on the rack, and inhumanly disjointed his arms; then they twisted a cord about his forehead, which they wrung so hard that his eyes appeared as big as eggs, and were ready to fall out. But with these torments not obtaining any positive answer, they hung him up by the wrists, giving him many blows and stripes under that intolerable pain and posture of body. Afterwards they cut off his nose and ears, and singed his face with burning straw, till he could not speak, nor lament his misery any longer: then, losing all hopes of any confession, they bade a negro run him through, which put an end to his life, and to their inhuman tortures. Thus did many others of those miserable prisoners finish their days, the common sport and recreation of these pirates being such tragedies.

Captain Morgan having now been at Panama full three weeks, commanded all things to be prepared for his departure. He ordered every company of men to seek so many beasts of carriage as might convey the spoil to the river where his canoes lay. About this time there was a great rumour, that a considerable number of pirates intended to leave Captain Morgan; and that, taking a ship then in port, they determined to go and rob on the South Sea, till they had got as much as they thought fit, and then return homewards, by way of the East Indies. For which purpose they had gathered much provisions, which they had hid in private places, with sufficient powder, bullets, and all other ammunition: likewise some great guns belonging to the town, muskets, and other things, wherewith they designed not only to equip their vessel, but to fortify themselves in some island which might serve them for a place of refuge.

This design had certainly taken effect, had not Captain Morgan had timely advice of it from one of their comrades: hereupon he commanded the mainmast of the said ship to be cut down and burnt, with all the other boats in the port: hereby the intentions of all or most of his companions were totally frustrated. Then Captain Morgan sent many of the Spaniards into the adjoining fields and country to seek for money, to ransom not only themselves, but the rest of the prisoners, as likewise the ecclesiastics. Moreover, he commanded all the artillery of the town to be nailed and stopped up. At the same time he sent out a strong company of men to seek for the governor of Panama, of whom intelligence was brought, that he had laid several ambuscades in the way by which he ought to return: but they returned soon after, saying they had not found any sign of any such ambuscades. For confirmation whereof, they brought some prisoners, who declared that the said governor had had an intention of making some opposition by the way, but that the men designed to effect it were unwilling to undertake it: so that for want of means he could not put his design in execution.

February 24, 1671, Captain Morgan departed from Panama, or rather from the place where the city of Panama stood; of the spoils whereof he carried with him one hundred and seventy-five beasts of carriage, laden with silver, gold, and other precious things, beside about six hundred prisoners, men, women, children and slaves. That day they came to a river that passes through a delicious plain, a league from Panama: here Captain Morgan put all his forces into good order, so as that the prisoners were in the middle, surrounded on all sides with pirates, where nothing else was to be heard but lamentations, cries, shrieks, and doleful sighs of so many women and children, who feared Captain Morgan designed to transport them all into his own country for slaves. Besides, all those miserable prisoners endured extreme hunger and thirst at that time, which misery Captain Morgan designedly caused them to sustain, to excite them to seek for money to ransom themselves, according to the tax he had set upon every one. Many of the women begged Captain Morgan, on their knees, with infinite sighs and tears, to let them return to Panama, there to live with their dear husbands and children in little huts of straw, which they would erect, seeing they had no houses till the rebuilding of the city. But his answer was, "He came not thither to hear lamentations and cries, but to seek money: therefore they ought first to seek out that, wherever it was to be had, and bring it to him; otherwise he would assuredly transport them all to such places whither they cared not to go."

Next day, when the march began, those lamentable cries and shrieks were renewed, so as it would have caused compassion in the hardest heart: but Captain Morgan, as a man little given to mercy, was not moved in the least. They marched in the same order as before, one party of the pirates in the van, the prisoners in the middle, and the rest of the pirates in the rear; by whom the miserable Spaniards were at every step punched and thrust in their backs and sides, with the blunt ends of their arms, to make them march faster.

A beautiful lady, wife to one of the richest merchants of Tavoga, was led prisoner by herself, between two pirates. Her lamentations pierced the skies, seeing herself carried away into captivity often crying to the pirates, and telling them, "That she had given orders to two religious persons, in whom she had relied, to go to a certain place, and fetch so much money as her ransom did amount to; that they had promised faithfully to do it, but having obtained the money, instead of bringing it to her, they had employed it another way, to ransom some of their own, and particular friends." This ill action of theirs was discovered by a slave, who brought a letter to the said lady. Her complaints, and the cause thereof, being brought to Captain Morgan, he thought fit to inquire thereinto. Having found it to be true—especially hearing it confirmed by the confession of the said religious men, though under some frivolous exercises of having diverted the money but for a day or two, in which time they expected more sums to repay it—he gave liberty to the said lady, whom otherwise he designed to transport to Jamaica. But he detained the said religious men as prisoners in her place, using them according to their deserts.

Captain Morgan arriving at the town called Cruz, on the banks of the river Chagre, he published an order among the prisoners, that within three days every one should bring in their ransom, under the penalty of being transported to Jamaica. Meanwhile he gave orders for so much rice and maize to be collected thereabouts, as was necessary for victualling his ships. Here some of the prisoners were ransomed, but many others could not bring in their money. Hereupon he continued his voyage, leaving the village on the 5th of March following, carrying with him all the spoil he could. Hence he likewise led away some new prisoners, inhabitants there, with those in Panama, who had not paid their ransoms. But the two religious men, who had diverted the lady's money, were ransomed three days after by other persons, who had more compassion for them than they had showed for her.

About the middle of the way to Chagre, Captain Morgan commanded them to be mustered, and caused every one to be sworn, that they had concealed nothing, even not to the value of sixpence. This done, Captain Morgan knowing those lewd fellows would not stick to swear falsely for interest, he commanded every one to be searched very strictly, both in their clothes and satchels, and elsewhere. Yea, that this order might not be ill taken by his companions, he permitted himself to be searched, even to his very shoes. To this effect, by common consent, one was assigned out of every company to be searchers of the rest. The French pirates that assisted on this expedition disliked this new practice of searching; but, being outnumbered by the English, they were forced to submit as well as the rest. The search being over, they re-embarked, and arrived at the castle of Chagre on the 9th of March. Here they found all things in good order, excepting the wounded men whom they had left at their departure; for of these the greatest number were dead of their wounds.

From Chagre, Captain Morgan sent, presently after his arrival, a great boat to Puerto Bello, with all the prisoners taken at the isle of St. Catherine, demanding of them a considerable ransom for the castle of Chagre, where he then was; threatening otherwise to ruin it. To this those of Puerto Bello answered, they would not give one farthing towards the ransom of the said castle, and the English might do with it as they pleased. Hereupon the dividend was made of all the spoil made in that voyage; every company, and every particular person therein, receiving their proportion, or rather what part thereof Captain Morgan pleased to give them. For the rest of his companions, even of his own nation, murmured at his proceedings, and told him to his face that he had reserved the best jewels to himself: for they judged it impossible that no greater share should belong to them than two hundred pieces of eight, per capita, of so many valuable plunders they had made; which small sum they thought too little for so much labour, and such dangers, as they had been exposed to. But Captain Morgan was deaf to all this, and many other like complaints, having designed to cheat them of what he could.

At last, finding himself obnoxious to many censures of his people, and fearing the consequence, he thought it unsafe to stay any longer at Chagre, but ordered the ordnance of the castle to be carried on board his ship; then he caused most of the walls to be demolished, the edifices to be burnt, and as many other things ruined as could be done in a short time. This done, he went secretly on board his own ship, without giving any notice to his companions, and put out to sea, being only followed by three or four vessels of the whole fleet. These were such (as the French pirates believed) as went shares with Captain Morgan in the best part of the spoil, which had been concealed from them in the dividend. The Frenchmen could willingly have revenged themselves on Captain Morgan and his followers, had they been able to encounter him at sea; but they were destitute of necessaries, and had much ado to find sufficient provisions for their voyage to Jamaica, he having left them unprovided for all things.

THE END

Побег из ГУЛАГа

Чернавина Т. Побег из ГУЛАГа

17. Духовенство в тюрьме

Записки «вредителя». Часть II. Тюрьма. 17. Духовенство в тюрьме

В СССР бывали определенные периоды гонений на бывших чиновников, военных, на интеллигенцию, крестьянство, специалистов, занятых на производстве. Гонения то обострялись, то затихали, вспыхивали снова в зависимости от различных поворотов политики, и достигли своего апогея после объявления пятилетки. Преследования священнослужителей, начавшиеся с первых дней советской власти, никогда не прекращались, но считалось, что правительство СССР в принципе якобы твердо держится свободы вероисповеданий и при случае демонстрирует «знатным иностранцам», как, например, Бернарду Шоу, какую-нибудь из уцелевших церквей. Граждане СССР прекрасно знают, что аресты среди «церковных» не прекращаются и что не всегда бывает легко найти священника, чтобы отслужить панихиду или похоронить человека верующего. За мое пребывание в тюрьме на Шпалерной в каждой общей камере всегда не менее десяти — пятнадцати человек, привлекавшихся по религиозным делам. Бывали они и в одиночках, так что общее их число было, вероятно, не менее десяти процентов. Формально им предъявлялось обвинение по статье 58, пункт 10 и пункт 11: контрреволюционная агитация и участие в контрреволюционной организации, что давало от трех лет заключения в концлагерь до расстрела с конфискацией имущества.

Таблица 4. Торпедное, артиллерийское, минное и стрелковое вооружение подводных лодок - 1

Короли подплава в море червонных валетов. Приложение. Таблица 4. Торпедное, артиллерийское, минное и стрелковое вооружение подводных лодок: Торпеды

Торпеды Тип торпеды Калибр, мм Длина, м Вес торпеды, кг Вес заряда кг Скорость хода, уз Дальность хода, км Примечание 45–15 (Уайтхеда1910/15 г. «Л») 450 5,2 655 100 38 1,0 Стале-бронзовая торпеда для лодок с «влажным подогревом» проекта Фиумского з-да. В советском флоте именовалась 45–15 и находилась на вооружении до ВОВ для пл т. «АГ». По направлению управлялась пр. Обри, по глубине — гидростатическим аппаратом. Имелось до 1 тыс. 34 2,0 29 3,0 25 4,0 53–27 533 7,15 1725 250 43,5 3,7 Проект Остехбюро. Производств о з-да «Двигатель». Изготовлено до 700 ед. Принята на вооружение в 1927 г. Подходила к аппаратам пл т. «Калев» 45–36-Н 450 5,7 935 200 41 3,0 Торпеда 45Ф, воспроизведенная НИМТИ по купленной в Италии. Производство з-да «Красный Прогресс».

Диагностируя диктаторов

Карл Густав Юнг : Диагностируя диктаторов : Аналитическая психология: прошлое и настоящее / К.Г.Юнг, Э. Cэмюэлс, В.Одайник, Дж. Хаббэк. Сост. В.В. Зеленский, А.М. Руткевич. М.: Мартис, 1995

Октябрь 1938 г. Запоминающийся интеллигентный и неутомимый X. Р. Никербокер был одним из лучших американских иностранных корреспондентов. Родился в Техасе в 1899 г.; в 1923 г. в Мюнхене, где он изучал психиатрию, во время пивного путча Гитлера переключился на журналистику, в дальнейшем большая часть его карьеры связана с Берлином. Но он также печатал материалы о Советском Союзе (премия Пулитцера 1931 г.), итало-эфиопской войне, гражданской войне в Испании, японо-китайской войне, присоединении Австрии, Мюнхенском соглашении. Он писал репортажи о битве за Британию, о войне в Тихом океане: погиб в 1949 г. в Бомбее в авиационной катастрофе. Никербокер посетил Юнга в Кюснахте в октябре 1938 г., приехав непосредственно из Праги, где оказался свидетелем распада Чехословакии. Это интервью, одно из самых продолжительных, которое дал Юнг, было опубликовано в «Херст Интернейшенл-Космополитен» за январь 1939 г. и в несколько измененном виде вошло в книгу Никербокера «Завтра Гитлер?» (1941). В основу настоящей публикации положена статья из «Kocмополитен», из которой исключили всякий иной материал, кроме вопросов и ответов. В этом же выпуске журнала был помещен биографический очерк о Юнге, написанный Элизабет Шепли Серджент. Эти статьи из «Космополитен» сделали имя Юнга известным в США. Никербокер: Что произойдет, если Гитлера, Муссолини и Сталина, всех вместе, закрыть на замок, выделив для них на неделю буханку хлеба и кувшин воды? Кто-то получит все или они разделят хлеб и воду? Юнг: Я сомневаюсь, что они поделятся.

Верхний Палеолит

Верхний Палеолит. Период примерно от 50 000 лет назад до 12 000 г. до н.э.

Верхний Палеолит. Период примерно от 50 000 лет назад до 12 000 г. до н.э.

Chapter XVIII

The pirates of Panama or The buccaneers of America : Chapter XVIII

Captain Morgan sends canoes and boats to the South Sea He fires the city of Panama Robberies and cruelties committed there by the pirates, till their return to the Castle of Chagre. CAPTAIN MORGAN, as soon as he had placed necessary guards at several quarters within and without the city, commanded twenty-five men to seize a great boat, which had stuck in the mud of the port, for want of water, at a low tide. The same day about noon, he caused fire privately to be set to several great edifices of the city, nobody knowing who were the authors thereof, much less on what motives Captain Morgan did it, which are unknown to this day: the fire increased so, that before night the greatest part of the city was in a flame. Captain Morgan pretended the Spaniards had done it, perceiving that his own people reflected on him for that action. Many of the Spaniards, and some of the pirates, did what they could, either to quench the flame, or, by blowing up houses with gunpowder, and pulling down others, to stop it, but in vain: for in less than half an hour it consumed a whole street. All the houses of the city were built with cedar, very curious and magnificent, and richly adorned, especially with hangings and paintings, whereof part were before removed, and another great part were consumed by fire. There were in this city (which is the see of a bishop) eight monasteries, seven for men, and one for women; two stately churches, and one hospital. The churches and monasteries were all richly adorned with altar-pieces and paintings, much gold and silver, and other precious things, all which the ecclesiastics had hidden.

III. Дорога в УСЛОН

Побег из ГУЛАГа. Часть 2. III. Дорога в УСЛОН

Октябрьский вокзал, бывший Николаевский, теперь Московский. Большевики любят менять названия. Двенадцать часов ночи. На Москву отходит «Красная стрела» — курьерский, на котором ездит вся советская знать и иностранцы. Видны международные вагоны, «мягкие» вагоны, — иначе говоря, первого и второго класса; все ярко освещено. Публика — с чемоданами, кожаными портфелями. Несколько советских дам (называются теперь сов-барыни) в котиковых манто, в шубах с огромными меховыми воротниками, в крохотных шляпках. На Мурманск — Кемь поезд идет с деревянной платформы. На перроне темно. Все занято тяжкой, простонародной толпой с мешками, самодельными сундучками, невероятными узлами, из которых торчат заплатанные валенки. Много мужиков с топорами и пилами. Много баб с малыми ребятами, одетыми в лохмотья, укрученными в обрывки старых платков и тряпок. Куда едут, на что едут — страшно подумать. С политикой уничтожения «кулака как класса» все сбиты с места и шатаются по всей Руси великой, потому что на своей родине — смерть верная и скорая, на чужой стороне тоже смерть, но на ходу не так страшно умирать. Многих выгоняют из домов насильно — «раскулачивают», многие бредут сами в надежде, что где-то дают хлеба кило на день. Что жить придется за Полярным кругом, в землянках или насквозь промерзающих бараках, что ребятишки перемрут за зиму, об этом не знают и не думают. Все равно — один конец. В вагонаx почти полный мрак. Народу набивается на пассажирские и багажные полки столько, что видишь только отовсюду торчащие ноги, головы, обезображенные тяжкой работой руки.

Таблица 4. Торпедное, артиллерийское, минное и стрелковое вооружение подводных лодок - 4

Короли подплава в море червонных валетов. Приложение. Таблица 4. Торпедное, артиллерийское, минное и стрелковое вооружение подводных лодок: Артиллерийское и стрелковое вооружение

Артиллерийское и стрелковое вооружение Наименование, система, завод-изготовитель Калибр, мм/длина ствола в калибрах, затвор, прицел, заряжание Дальность стрельбы, каб На каких подводных лодках устанавливались и в каком количестве Орудие Б-24ПЛ 100/45; 100/51, клиновой, 1 х ПЛ, патронное 118,5 Т. «Д» — 1; «К» — 2; «Л» — 1; «П» — 2; «С» — 1 Орудие 21-К 45/46, клиновой, 1 х ШБ-1М, патронное 51,3 Т. «Д» — 1; «К» — 2; «Л» — 1; «П» — 1; «С» — 1; «Щ» III сер — 1; «Щ» — 2; «М» — 1 Орудие системы Канэ на станке Меллера, Обуховский 75/50, поршневой, оптический, патронное 42 Т. «Барс»: «Пантера», «Леопард», «Рысь», «Буревестник» — по 1. В 20-е гг. на всех «барсах», оставшихся в строю, 57-мм орудия сменили на 75-мм. Т. «Ёрш» — 1, «Л-55» — 1 Орудие системы Гочкиса, Обуховский 57/50, клиновой, патронное 25 «Нерпа» — 1, т.

Глава 20

Сквозь ад русской революции. Воспоминания гардемарина. 1914–1919. Глава 20

Советская Россия и Финляндия – два различных мира. Два народа, жившие рядом, не имели точек соприкосновения и надежных средств сообщения. Контраст был поразительным. После двух лет лицезрения грязных, неряшливых красноармейцев чистенькая, аккуратная военная форма финнов радовала глаз. Смена опасного, неопрятного, запущенного Петрограда на безупречно чистую финскую деревушку оказывала умиротворяющее воздействие. Простой деревянный дом, в котором размещалась комендантская служба, был безукоризненно опрятным: пол, окна, сосновые скамейки – все сияло чистотой. Комендант, молодой розовощекий лейтенант, принимал каждого беженца из советской России по одному. Когда я сидел перед дверью его кабинета, ожидая вызова, вошел наш проводник. Все финские солдаты, видимо, были с ним знакомы. Из обрывков разговора, которые удалось услышать, я убедился, что помимо сопровождения людей из России в Финляндию, проводник передавал финской стороне и разведывательные данные. Проводник подошел, вручил мне пакет и сказал: – Здесь пятьсот марок… Где мой револьвер? Я передал ему оружие. – Если вам захочется вернуться, лейтенант скажет, где меня найти. – Сомневаюсь, что захочется, но если все же я передумаю, то постараюсь вас отыскать. Никто не поможет в этом деле лучше. Впервые за наше непродолжительное знакомство на лице проводника появилось нечто вроде улыбки. Очевидно, сказанное польстило его профессиональной гордости. Мы обменялись рукопожатием, и он ушел. Беседа с комендантом длилась недолго. Он задал мне несколько вопросов и записал ответы в карточку.

Глава XV

Путешествие натуралиста вокруг света на корабле «Бигль». Глава XV. Переход через Кордильеры

Вальпараисо Перевал Портильо Сообразительность мулов Горные потоки Как была открыта руда Доказательства постепенного поднятия Кордильер Влияние снега на горные породы Геологическое строение двух главных хребтов, различие их происхождения и поднятия Значительное опускание Красный снег Ветры Снежные столбы Сухой и прозрачный воздух Электричестве Пампасы Фауна восточных склонов Ано Саранча Огромные клопы Мендоси Перевал Успальята Окременелые деревья, погребенные в их естественном положении Мост Инков Преувеличенная трудность горных проходов Кумбре Касучи Вальпараисо 7 марта 1835 г. — Мы простояли в Консепсьоне три дня и отплыли в Вальпараисо. Ветер был северный, и мы добрались до выхода из гавани Консепсьона только перед наступлением сумерек. Так как мы находились очень близко к земле и опускался густой туман, то мы бросили якорь. Вскоре у самого нашего борта вдруг появилось американское китобойное судно: мы услыхали голос янки, заклинавшего матросов помолчать, пока он прислушивается к бурунам. Капитан Фиц-Рой крикнул ему громко и отчетливо, чтобы он бросил якорь там, где находится. Бедняга решил, должно быть, что это голос с берега: на судне его тотчас же поднялся страшный галдеж, все закричали: «Отдавай якорь! трави канат! убирай паруса!» Ничего более смешного я никогда не слыхал. Если бы весь экипаж судна состоял из одних капитанов, без единого матроса, то и тогда не могло бы возникнуть большего гама, чем тот, в какой сливались эти беспорядочно выкрикиваемые команды.

Таблица 3. Переименование подводных лодок - 2

Короли подплава в море червонных валетов. Приложение. Таблица 3. Переименование подводных лодок: Черноморский флот

Черноморский флот Первоначальное имя Годы переименований и новые имена 1920 1921 1922 1923 1930 1931 1934 «АГ-21»         «Металлист», № 16 «А-5» «АГ-23» «АГ-23 им. тов. Троцкого» ПЛ-16 «Незаможный» «Шахтер» №12   «А-1» «АГ-24» «АГ-24 им. тов. Луначарского» ПЛ-17 «Коммунист»   №13   «А-2» [399] «АГ-25»   ПЛ-18   «Марксист» № 14   «А-3» «АГ-26» «АГ-26 им. тов. С. С. Каменева» ПЛ-19   «Политработник»     «А-4» «Нерпа»   ПЛ-20 «Политрук»   №11    

10. «Академическое дело»

Записки «вредителя». Часть II. Тюрьма. 10. «Академическое дело»

«Академическое дело» или, как его называли еще, «платоновское дело», по имени академика С. Ф. Платонова, было одним из самых крупных дел ГПУ, наряду с «шахтинским процессом», делом «48-ми», процессом «промпартии» и др. Для жизни русской интеллигенции оно имело огромное значение, значительно большее, чем пышно разыгранный весной 1931 года «процесс меньшевиков», подробно освещенный в советской и заграничной печати. «Академическое дело» известно сравнительно мало, потому что ГПУ не вынесло его на открытый суд и решило судьбу крупнейших ученых в своих застенках. Скудные сведения о нем, проникавшие через лиц, привлеченных по этому «делу», и от близких, передавались каждый раз с такой опаской, были так отрывочны, что даже официальная часть, то есть самое обвинение, осталась в значительной мере неясной и противоречивой. Когда явится возможность представить это дело по документам и свидетельствам людей, непосредственно привлекавшихся по нему, оно займет место истинного некролога русской, особенно исторической, науки. Это будет одна из самых трагичных страниц в повести о русской интеллигенции. Я же могу говорить о нем только как случайный свидетель, со слов лиц, попадавших со мною в те же тюремные камеры, бывших со мною в этапе или в Соловецком концентрационном лагере. Кроме того, я связан тем, что могу передать только ту часть разговоров, по которым ГПУ не сможет установить, от кого я их слышал. Особенностью этого «дела» было прежде всего то, что оно оказалось «неудачным» для ГПУ.