Chapter XVIII


Captain Morgan sends canoes and boats to the South Sea
He fires the city of Panama
Robberies and cruelties committed there by the pirates, till their return to the Castle of Chagre.


CAPTAIN MORGAN, as soon as he had placed necessary guards at several quarters within and without the city, commanded twenty-five men to seize a great boat, which had stuck in the mud of the port, for want of water, at a low tide. The same day about noon, he caused fire privately to be set to several great edifices of the city, nobody knowing who were the authors thereof, much less on what motives Captain Morgan did it, which are unknown to this day: the fire increased so, that before night the greatest part of the city was in a flame. Captain Morgan pretended the Spaniards had done it, perceiving that his own people reflected on him for that action. Many of the Spaniards, and some of the pirates, did what they could, either to quench the flame, or, by blowing up houses with gunpowder, and pulling down others, to stop it, but in vain: for in less than half an hour it consumed a whole street. All the houses of the city were built with cedar, very curious and magnificent, and richly adorned, especially with hangings and paintings, whereof part were before removed, and another great part were consumed by fire.

There were in this city (which is the see of a bishop) eight monasteries, seven for men, and one for women; two stately churches, and one hospital. The churches and monasteries were all richly adorned with altar-pieces and paintings, much gold and silver, and other precious things, all which the ecclesiastics had hidden. Besides which, here were two thousand houses of magnificent building, the greatest part inhabited by merchants vastly rich. For the rest of less quality, and tradesmen, this city contained five thousand more. Here were also many stables for the horses and mules that carry the plate of the king of Spain, as well as private men, towards the North Sea. The neighbouring fields are full of fertile plantations and pleasant gardens, affording delicious prospects to the inhabitants all the year.

The Genoese had in this city a stately house for their trade of negroes. This likewise was by Captain Morgan burnt to the very ground. Besides which building, there were consumed two hundred warehouses, and many slaves, who had hid themselves therein, with innumerable sacks of meal; the fire of which continued four weeks after it had begun. The greatest part of the pirates still encamped without the city, fearing and expecting the Spaniards would come and fight them anew, it being known they much outnumbered the pirates. This made them keep the field, to preserve their forces united, now much diminished by their losses. Their wounded, which were many, they put into one church, which remained standing, the rest being consumed by the fire. Besides these decreases of their men, Captain Morgan had sent a convoy of one hundred and fifty men to the castle of Chagre, to carry the news of his victory at Panama.

They saw often whole troops of Spaniards run to and fro in the fields, which made them suspect their rallying, which they never had the courage to do. In the afternoon Captain Morgan re-entered the city with his troops, that every one might take up their lodgings, which now they could hardly find, few houses having escaped the fire. Then they sought very carefully among the ruins and ashes, for utensils of plate or gold, that were not quite wasted by the flames: and of such they found no small number, especially in wells and cisterns, where the Spaniards had hid them.

Next day Captain Morgan dispatched away two troops, of one hundred and fifty men each, stout and well armed, to seek for the inhabitants who were escaped. These having made several excursions up and down the fields, woods, and mountains adjacent, returned after two days, bringing above two hundred prisoners, men, women, and slaves. The same day returned also the boat which Captain Morgan had sent to the South Sea, bringing three other boats which they had taken. But all these prizes they could willingly have given, and greater labour into the bargain, for one galleon, which miraculously escaped, richly laden with all the king's plate, jewels, and other precious goods of the best and richest merchants of Panama: on board which were also the religious women of the nunnery, who had embarked with them all the ornaments of their church, consisting in much gold, plate, and other things of great value.

The strength of this galleon was inconsiderable, having only seven guns, and ten or twelve muskets, and very ill provided with victuals, necessaries, and fresh water, having no more sails than the uppermost of the mainmast. This account the pirates received from some one who had spoken with seven mariners belonging to the galleon, who came ashore in the cockboat for fresh water. Hence they concluded they might easily have taken it, had they given her chase, as they should have done; but they were impeded from following this vastly rich prize, by their gluttony and drunkenness, having plentifully debauched themselves with several rich wines they found ready, choosing rather to satiate their appetites than to lay hold on such huge advantage; since this only prize would have been of far greater value than all they got at Panama, and the places thereabout. Next day, repenting of their negligence, being weary of their vices and debaucheries, they set forth another boat, well armed, to pursue with all speed the said galleon; but in vain, the Spaniards who were on board having had intelligence of their own danger one or two days before, while the pirates were cruising so near them; whereupon they fled to places more remote and unknown.

The pirates found, in the ports of the island of Tavoga and Tavogilla, several boats laden with very good merchandise; all which they took, and brought to Panama, where they made an exact relation of all that had passed to Captain Morgan. The prisoners confirmed what the pirates said, adding, that they undoubtedly knew where the galleon might then be, but that it was very probable they had been relieved before now from other places. This stirred up Captain Morgan anew, to send forth all the boats in the port of Panama to seek the said galleon till they could find her. These boats, being in all four, after eight days' cruising to and fro, and searching several ports and creeks, lost all hopes of finding her: hereupon they returned to Tavoga and Tavogilla; here they found a reasonable good ship newly come from Payta, laden with cloth, soap, sugar, and biscuit, with 20,000 pieces of eight; this they instantly seized, without the least resistance; as also a boat which was not far off, on which they laded great part of the merchandises from the ship, with some slaves. With this purchase they returned to Panama, somewhat better satisfied; yet, withal, much discontented that they could not meet with the galleon.

The convoy which Captain Morgan had sent to the castle of Chagre returned much about the same time, bringing with them very good news; for while Captain Morgan was on his journey to Panama, those he had left in the castle of Chagre had sent for two boats to cruise. These met with a Spanish ship, which they chased within sight of the castle. This being perceived by the pirates in the castle, they put forth Spanish colours, to deceive the ship that fled before the boats; and the poor Spaniards, thinking to take refuge under the castle, were caught in a snare, and made prisoners. The cargo on board the said vessel consisted in victuals and provisions, than which nothing could be more opportune for the castle, where they began already to want things of this kind.

This good luck of those of Chagre caused Captain Morgan to stay longer at Panama, ordering several new excursions into the country round about; and while the pirates at Panama were upon these expeditions, those at Chagre were busy in piracies on the North Sea. Captain Morgan sent forth, daily, parties of two hundred men, to make inroads into all the country round about; and when one party came back, another went forth, who soon gathered much riches, and many prisoners. These being brought into the city, were put to the most exquisite tortures, to make them confess both other people's goods and their own. Here it happened that one poor wretch was found in the house of a person of quality, who had put on, amidst the confusion, a pair of taffety breeches of his master's, with a little silver key hanging out; perceiving which, they asked him for the cabinet of the said key. His answer was, he knew not what was become of it, but that finding those breeches in his master's house, he had made bold to wear them. Not being able to get any other answer, they put him on the rack, and inhumanly disjointed his arms; then they twisted a cord about his forehead, which they wrung so hard that his eyes appeared as big as eggs, and were ready to fall out. But with these torments not obtaining any positive answer, they hung him up by the wrists, giving him many blows and stripes under that intolerable pain and posture of body. Afterwards they cut off his nose and ears, and singed his face with burning straw, till he could not speak, nor lament his misery any longer: then, losing all hopes of any confession, they bade a negro run him through, which put an end to his life, and to their inhuman tortures. Thus did many others of those miserable prisoners finish their days, the common sport and recreation of these pirates being such tragedies.

Captain Morgan having now been at Panama full three weeks, commanded all things to be prepared for his departure. He ordered every company of men to seek so many beasts of carriage as might convey the spoil to the river where his canoes lay. About this time there was a great rumour, that a considerable number of pirates intended to leave Captain Morgan; and that, taking a ship then in port, they determined to go and rob on the South Sea, till they had got as much as they thought fit, and then return homewards, by way of the East Indies. For which purpose they had gathered much provisions, which they had hid in private places, with sufficient powder, bullets, and all other ammunition: likewise some great guns belonging to the town, muskets, and other things, wherewith they designed not only to equip their vessel, but to fortify themselves in some island which might serve them for a place of refuge.

This design had certainly taken effect, had not Captain Morgan had timely advice of it from one of their comrades: hereupon he commanded the mainmast of the said ship to be cut down and burnt, with all the other boats in the port: hereby the intentions of all or most of his companions were totally frustrated. Then Captain Morgan sent many of the Spaniards into the adjoining fields and country to seek for money, to ransom not only themselves, but the rest of the prisoners, as likewise the ecclesiastics. Moreover, he commanded all the artillery of the town to be nailed and stopped up. At the same time he sent out a strong company of men to seek for the governor of Panama, of whom intelligence was brought, that he had laid several ambuscades in the way by which he ought to return: but they returned soon after, saying they had not found any sign of any such ambuscades. For confirmation whereof, they brought some prisoners, who declared that the said governor had had an intention of making some opposition by the way, but that the men designed to effect it were unwilling to undertake it: so that for want of means he could not put his design in execution.

February 24, 1671, Captain Morgan departed from Panama, or rather from the place where the city of Panama stood; of the spoils whereof he carried with him one hundred and seventy-five beasts of carriage, laden with silver, gold, and other precious things, beside about six hundred prisoners, men, women, children and slaves. That day they came to a river that passes through a delicious plain, a league from Panama: here Captain Morgan put all his forces into good order, so as that the prisoners were in the middle, surrounded on all sides with pirates, where nothing else was to be heard but lamentations, cries, shrieks, and doleful sighs of so many women and children, who feared Captain Morgan designed to transport them all into his own country for slaves. Besides, all those miserable prisoners endured extreme hunger and thirst at that time, which misery Captain Morgan designedly caused them to sustain, to excite them to seek for money to ransom themselves, according to the tax he had set upon every one. Many of the women begged Captain Morgan, on their knees, with infinite sighs and tears, to let them return to Panama, there to live with their dear husbands and children in little huts of straw, which they would erect, seeing they had no houses till the rebuilding of the city. But his answer was, "He came not thither to hear lamentations and cries, but to seek money: therefore they ought first to seek out that, wherever it was to be had, and bring it to him; otherwise he would assuredly transport them all to such places whither they cared not to go."

Next day, when the march began, those lamentable cries and shrieks were renewed, so as it would have caused compassion in the hardest heart: but Captain Morgan, as a man little given to mercy, was not moved in the least. They marched in the same order as before, one party of the pirates in the van, the prisoners in the middle, and the rest of the pirates in the rear; by whom the miserable Spaniards were at every step punched and thrust in their backs and sides, with the blunt ends of their arms, to make them march faster.

A beautiful lady, wife to one of the richest merchants of Tavoga, was led prisoner by herself, between two pirates. Her lamentations pierced the skies, seeing herself carried away into captivity often crying to the pirates, and telling them, "That she had given orders to two religious persons, in whom she had relied, to go to a certain place, and fetch so much money as her ransom did amount to; that they had promised faithfully to do it, but having obtained the money, instead of bringing it to her, they had employed it another way, to ransom some of their own, and particular friends." This ill action of theirs was discovered by a slave, who brought a letter to the said lady. Her complaints, and the cause thereof, being brought to Captain Morgan, he thought fit to inquire thereinto. Having found it to be true—especially hearing it confirmed by the confession of the said religious men, though under some frivolous exercises of having diverted the money but for a day or two, in which time they expected more sums to repay it—he gave liberty to the said lady, whom otherwise he designed to transport to Jamaica. But he detained the said religious men as prisoners in her place, using them according to their deserts.

Captain Morgan arriving at the town called Cruz, on the banks of the river Chagre, he published an order among the prisoners, that within three days every one should bring in their ransom, under the penalty of being transported to Jamaica. Meanwhile he gave orders for so much rice and maize to be collected thereabouts, as was necessary for victualling his ships. Here some of the prisoners were ransomed, but many others could not bring in their money. Hereupon he continued his voyage, leaving the village on the 5th of March following, carrying with him all the spoil he could. Hence he likewise led away some new prisoners, inhabitants there, with those in Panama, who had not paid their ransoms. But the two religious men, who had diverted the lady's money, were ransomed three days after by other persons, who had more compassion for them than they had showed for her.

About the middle of the way to Chagre, Captain Morgan commanded them to be mustered, and caused every one to be sworn, that they had concealed nothing, even not to the value of sixpence. This done, Captain Morgan knowing those lewd fellows would not stick to swear falsely for interest, he commanded every one to be searched very strictly, both in their clothes and satchels, and elsewhere. Yea, that this order might not be ill taken by his companions, he permitted himself to be searched, even to his very shoes. To this effect, by common consent, one was assigned out of every company to be searchers of the rest. The French pirates that assisted on this expedition disliked this new practice of searching; but, being outnumbered by the English, they were forced to submit as well as the rest. The search being over, they re-embarked, and arrived at the castle of Chagre on the 9th of March. Here they found all things in good order, excepting the wounded men whom they had left at their departure; for of these the greatest number were dead of their wounds.

From Chagre, Captain Morgan sent, presently after his arrival, a great boat to Puerto Bello, with all the prisoners taken at the isle of St. Catherine, demanding of them a considerable ransom for the castle of Chagre, where he then was; threatening otherwise to ruin it. To this those of Puerto Bello answered, they would not give one farthing towards the ransom of the said castle, and the English might do with it as they pleased. Hereupon the dividend was made of all the spoil made in that voyage; every company, and every particular person therein, receiving their proportion, or rather what part thereof Captain Morgan pleased to give them. For the rest of his companions, even of his own nation, murmured at his proceedings, and told him to his face that he had reserved the best jewels to himself: for they judged it impossible that no greater share should belong to them than two hundred pieces of eight, per capita, of so many valuable plunders they had made; which small sum they thought too little for so much labour, and such dangers, as they had been exposed to. But Captain Morgan was deaf to all this, and many other like complaints, having designed to cheat them of what he could.

At last, finding himself obnoxious to many censures of his people, and fearing the consequence, he thought it unsafe to stay any longer at Chagre, but ordered the ordnance of the castle to be carried on board his ship; then he caused most of the walls to be demolished, the edifices to be burnt, and as many other things ruined as could be done in a short time. This done, he went secretly on board his own ship, without giving any notice to his companions, and put out to sea, being only followed by three or four vessels of the whole fleet. These were such (as the French pirates believed) as went shares with Captain Morgan in the best part of the spoil, which had been concealed from them in the dividend. The Frenchmen could willingly have revenged themselves on Captain Morgan and his followers, had they been able to encounter him at sea; but they were destitute of necessaries, and had much ado to find sufficient provisions for their voyage to Jamaica, he having left them unprovided for all things.

THE END

Les Grandes Misères de la guerre

Jacques Callot. Les Grandes Misères de la guerre, 1633

Les Grandes Misères de la guerre sont une série de dix-huit eaux-fortes, éditées en 1633, et qui constituent l'une des œuvres maitresses de Jacques Callot. Le titre exact en est (d'après la planche de titre) : Les Misères et les Malheurs de la guerre, mais on appelle fréquemment cette série Les Grandes Misères... pour la différencier de la série Les Petites Misères de la guerre. Cette suite se compose de dix-huit pièces qui représentent, plus complètement que dans les Petites Misères, les malheurs occasionnés par la guerre. Les plaques sont conservées au Musée lorrain de Nancy.

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13. Мой первый допрос

Записки «вредителя». Часть I. Время террора. 13. Мой первый допрос

Медленно шел я к стоящему на высоком берегу одноэтажному длинному, как барак, дому ГПУ. Вокруг него, как и у других домов Мурманска, забора не было; грязь такая же, как всюду. Перед домом среди вонючих помойных ям рылись свиньи. Прихожая, или комната для дежурных, разделена низкой перегородкой, за которой сидят двое в красноармейской форме. Один деятельно крутил ручку допотопного телефона, всегда бывшего в неисправности, второй зевал и лениво разглядывал меня. — Вам кого? Протянул ему молча повестку. — Обождите. Сел на скамью, уныло смотрю, как медленно движутся стрелки на стенных часах. Дежурные говорят о выдачах в кооперативе. Наконец, подходит красноармеец. — Давайте! Пропустил меня вперед и ввел в коридор. Арестован я уже, или это у них такой общий порядок водить под конвоем? Коридор широкий, грязный, темный. Справа ряд дверей с висячими замками — камеры. Здесь сейчас С. В. Щербаков и К. И. Кротов, люди, которые, может быть, заслуживают наибольшего уважения в тресте. У одной из дверей в конце коридора конвойный останавливает меня. — Обождите. — Слегка стучит в дверь, вводит в кабинет следователя. Грязные тесовые стены, некрашеный пол, два стола, три стула. За одним из столов сидит женщина. «Опять ждать, — подумал я, — верно, стенографистка». Мне и в голову не пришло, что следователем может быть женщина; меня удивило, когда она обратилась ко мне со словами: — Товарищ Чернавин, садитесь, нам надо много о чем с вами поговорить. Она указала мне на стул перед ее столом.

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8. Дырка в голову

Записки «вредителя». Часть II. Тюрьма. 8. Дырка в голову

Неделю меня не вызывали на допрос. Я не удивлялся, так как в камере вскоре узнал повадки следователей. Основная заповедь советского арестанта — не верь следователю — действительна во всех мелочах. Следователь врет всегда. Если он говорит: «Я вас вызову завтра», значит, он собирается оставить вас в покое; если грозит: «Лишу передачи», значит, об этом и не думает, и т. д. И все же, даже зная это, очень трудно действительно не верить следователю. Арестант, которому сказано, что его вызовут на допрос, невольно его ждет и волнуется. Так для меня прошла неделя монотонной суетной жизни в камере, в которой часы и дни слиты в один поток, и кажется, будто только что началось это сидение, и в то же время, что продолжается бесконечно долго. Наконец, снова раздался голос стража, неверно читающего мою фамилию: — Имя, отчество? Давай! Следователь Барышников сидит с мрачным видом. — Садитесь. Как поживаете? — Ничего. — Давно вас не вызывал. Очень занят. Познакомились с камерой? — Познакомился. — Нашли знакомых? — Нет. — С кем сошлись ближе? — С бандитами. Хорошие ребята — Сокол, Смирнов и другие. Знаете? — А еще с кем? — Больше ни с кем. — Пора бросить ваши увертки и отвечать как следует. Я пожал плечами. — Ваши преступления нам известны... Бросьте ваш независимый вид. Вы — вредитель.

Глава 7. Зимняя война балтийских подводных лодок (1939–1940 гг.) [154]

Короли подплава в море червонных валетов. Часть III. Обзор эволюции подводных сил СССР (1935-1941 гг.). Глава 7. Зимняя война балтийских подводных лодок (1939–1940 гг.)

30 ноября 1939 г. Советский Союз развязал войну против маленькой Финляндии, по численности населения не превосходившей Ленинграда. Вошедшие в зону войны Балтийский и Северный флоты приступили к выполнению поставленных перед ними боевых задач. Основные боевые действия флота развернулись на Балтийском морском театре, охватив среднюю часть Балтийского моря, Финский и Ботнический заливы. В войне приняли участие надводные корабли, подводные лодки, авиация, артиллерийские и стрелковые части береговой обороны флота. К войне с Финляндией Советский Союз стал готовиться заблаговременно, обвинив финское правительство в подготовке к нападению на СССР. Уже 3 ноября 1939 г. НК ВМФ флагман флота 2 ранга Н. Кузнецов директивой Военному совету БФ № 10254сс поставил задачу Балтийскому флоту (командующий флотом флагман 2 ранга [155] В. Трибуц, начальник штаба флота капитан 1 ранга Ю. Пантелеев) на ведение боевых действий. Согласно директиве приказано: — подводным лодкам найти и уничтожить броненосцы береговой обороны (ббо) Финляндии, не допустить их ухода в Швецию; — действиями подводных лодок и авиации у берегов Финляндии прекратить подвоз морем войск, боеприпасов и сырья; — в случае вступления или помощи Швеции действиями авиации, подводных лодок и легких сил воспрепятствовать шведскому флоту оказывать помощь Финляндии. Следует отметить невысокое качество самой подготовки к войне, основывавшейся на мизерных разведывательных данных о флоте и береговой обороне соседней Финляндии. «Разведка работала и продолжает еще работать плохо.

Chapter IV

The voyage of the Beagle. Chapter IV. Rio Negro to Bahia Blanca

Rio Negro Estancias attacked by the Indians Salt-Lakes Flamingoes R. Negro to R. Colorado Sacred Tree Patagonian Hare Indian Families General Rosas Proceed to Bahia Blanca Sand Dunes Negro Lieutenant Bahia Blanca Saline Incrustations Punta Alta Zorillo. JULY 24th, 1833.—The Beagle sailed from Maldonado, and on August the 3rd she arrived off the mouth of the Rio Negro. This is the principal river on the whole line of coast between the Strait of Magellan and the Plata. It enters the sea about three hundred miles south of the estuary of the Plata. About fifty years ago, under the old Spanish government, a small colony was established here; and it is still the most southern position (lat. 41 degs.) on this eastern coast of America inhabited by civilized man. The country near the mouth of the river is wretched in the extreme: on the south side a long line of perpendicular cliffs commences, which exposes a section of the geological nature of the country. The strata are of sandstone, and one layer was remarkable from being composed of a firmly-cemented conglomerate of pumice pebbles, which must have travelled more than four hundred miles, from the Andes. The surface is everywhere covered up by a thick bed of gravel, which extends far and wide over the open plain. Water is extremely scarce, and, where found, is almost invariably brackish.

Глава 29

Сквозь ад русской революции. Воспоминания гардемарина. 1914–1919. Глава 29

Впервые за шесть лет мы оказались в городе, не изувеченном обезображивающими шрамами. Обильная зеленая листва парков и веселая суета на улицах превращали Копенгаген в волшебную сказку. После нескольких лет, проведенных среди людей, которые постоянно испытывали голод и неопределенность, датчане показались нам фантастическими существами из другого мира. Мы с изумлением смотрели на ухоженных мужчин, праздно прогуливающихся вдоль тротуаров, глазели на беззаботных элегантных женщин и на детей, оглашавших улицы громким смехом. Мы не верили своим глазам и чувствам. Но еще удивительнее было их отношение к нам. Несколько лет нас преследовали так долго и неотступно, что каждого постороннего человека мы невольно воспринимали с опаской, как потенциального противника. Уже наутро все датские газеты отвели целые колонки рассказам о нас и нашем корабле. Сначала нас обеспокоили толпы людей, собравшиеся у перил набережной и наблюдавшие, как мы драили палубу и наводили чистоту на корабле. Но не было нужды знакомиться с датчанами близко, чтобы сразу же почувствовать их расположение, и эта атмосфера дружественности оказывала на нас ошеломляющее впечатление. На другой день мы не имели отбоя от посетителей и приглашений. В Копенгагене было много русских – большей частью семьи, которые во время революции находились за рубежом. Они распахнули для нас двери своих домов и буквально состязались друг с другом в гостеприимности.

VIII. Конец семьи

Побег из ГУЛАГа. Часть 1. VIII. Конец семьи

Катастрофы всегда внезапны, сколько бы их не ждали. Месяц ночных мук, прислушивания к шагам, к словам, к каждому шороху — а случилось это почти днем, когда возвращались со службы. В это время легко не застать дома, но услужливый коммунист-сослуживец справился по телефону: — Дома? Ну, как поживаете? — Вам что-нибудь нужно? — Нет, ничего. Я хотел спросить, не уезжаете ли куда? Через четверть часа агент ГПУ был у нас с ордером на арест... Я задержалась на службе, а когда пришла, все было кончено. Почти ничего не тронуто: обыск производился поверхностный, небрежный, потому что действительное положение вещей их не интересовало. Возможно, что и развязка была уже предрешена... Какой-то безликий молодой человек в штатском с равнодушным видом сидел в кресле и курил. Больше ничего, а дома, семьи уже не было. Все кругом будто оледенело, умерло. Муж переодевался, собирал вещи, быть может, в последнюю дорогу, я ему молча помогала, но все это так машинально, что я не знала, живы ли мы еще или вместо нас двигались наши тени. Все стало каким-то призрачным, ненастоящим... По окончании формальностей с актом об обыске все сели за стол в столовой. Собрала чай, его никто не пил, — нельзя было сделать ни глотка. Машину все не подавали: при таком разгоне у ГПУ не хватало автомобилей. Мы сидели и молча, в последний раз, смотрели друг на друга.

Часть II. Тюрьма

Записки «вредителя». Часть II. Тюрьма

Chapter I

The voyage of the Beagle. Chapter I. St.Jago - Cape de Verde Islands

Porto Praya Ribeira Grande Atmospheric Dust with Infusoria Habits of a Sea-slug and Cuttle-fish St. Paul's Rocks, non-volcanic Singular Incrustations Insects the first Colonists of Islands Fernando Noronha Bahia Burnished Rocks Habits of a Diodon Pelagic Confervae and Infusoria Causes of discoloured Sea AFTER having been twice driven back by heavy southwestern gales, Her Majesty's ship Beagle, a ten-gun brig, under the command of Captain Fitz Roy, R. N., sailed from Devonport on the 27th of December, 1831. The object of the expedition was to complete the survey of Patagonia and Tierra del Fuego, commenced under Captain King in 1826 to 1830,—to survey the shores of Chile, Peru, and of some islands in the Pacific—and to carry a chain of chronometrical measurements round the World. On the 6th of January we reached Teneriffe, but were prevented landing, by fears of our bringing the cholera: the next morning we saw the sun rise behind the rugged outline of the Grand Canary island, and suddenly illuminate the Peak of Teneriffe, whilst the lower parts were veiled in fleecy clouds. This was the first of many delightful days never to be forgotten. On the 16th of January, 1832, we anchored at Porto Praya, in St. Jago, the chief island of the Cape de Verd archipelago. The neighbourhood of Porto Praya, viewed from the sea, wears a desolate aspect. The volcanic fires of a past age, and the scorching heat of a tropical sun, have in most places rendered the soil unfit for vegetation.

1. «Добро пожаловать»

Записки «вредителя». Часть III. Концлагерь. 1. «Добро пожаловать»

Попов остров, куда нас наконец привезли, не совсем остров. Отделен он от материка только «обсушкой» — низким местом, затопляемым морем два раза в сутки во время прилива. В отлив он соединяется с сушей труднопроходимым болотом. Когда-то он был покрыт лесом, теперь там торчат только отдельные кривые деревья, стелется полярная березка, и моховые болота чередуются с выходами огромных, выглаженных льдами гранитов. На Поповом острове — огромный лесопильный завод, морская пристань, куда приходят иностранные пароходы за советским лесом, а в двух-трех километрах от нее два распределительных пункта Соловецкого концлагеря — «Мореплав» и «Кок». Нас выгрузили и погнали в «Мореплав». Шли мы по грязной, тяжелой дороге, по болоту, по талому снегу. Мы еще хуже держались на ногах, чем нас гнали из «Крестов», вещи валились из рук, но нас также окружили конвойными, также, нет, хуже — понукали грубыми окриками и бранью. Протащившись километра два, мы увидели деревянные вышки, часовых, заграждение из колючей проволоки и огромные ворота. У ворот «за проволокой» был дощатый барак, где находится канцелярия коменданта и караульное помещение. За этими воротами начиналась каторга. — Посмотрите вверх, — дернул меня за рукав мой сосед. Над воротами была арка, убранная еловыми ветками. Над ней два плаката: «Да здравствует 1 Мая, праздник трудящихся всего мира!» и «Добро пожаловать!» Я не мог удержаться от смеха. Смеялись все, кто поднимал голову и видел плакаты.