Chapter VII


Lolonois equips a fleet to land upon the Spanish islands of America, with intent to rob, sack and burn whatsoever he met with.


OF this design Lolonois giving notice to all the pirates, whether at home or abroad, he got together, in a little while, above four hundred men; beside which, there was then in Tortuga another pirate, named Michael de Basco, who, by his piracy, had got riches sufficient to live at ease, and go no more abroad; having, withal, the office of major of the island. But seeing the great preparations that Lolonois made for this expedition, he joined him, and offered him, that if he would make him his chief captain by land (seeing he knew the country very well, and all its avenues) he would share in his fortunes, and go with him. They agreed upon articles to the great joy of Lolonois, knowing that Basco had done great actions in Europe, and had the repute of a good soldier. Thus they all embarked in eight vessels, that of Lolonois being the greatest, having ten guns of indifferent carriage.

All things being ready, and the whole company on board, they set sail together about the end of April, being, in all, six hundred and sixty persons. They steered for that part called Bayala, north of Hispaniola: here they took into their company some French hunters, who voluntarily offered themselves, and here they provided themselves with victuals and necessaries for their voyage.

From hence they sailed again the last of July, and steered directly to the eastern cape of the isle called Punta d'Espada. Hereabouts espying a ship from Puerto Rico, bound for New Spain, laden with cocoa-nuts, Lolonois commanded the rest of the fleet to wait for him near Savona, on the east of Cape Punta d'Espada, he alone intending to take the said vessel. The Spaniards, though they had been in sight full two hours, and knew them to be pirates, yet would not flee, but prepared to fight, being well armed, and provided. The combat lasted three hours, and then they surrendered. This ship had sixteen guns, and fifty fighting men aboard: they found in her 120,000 weight of cocoa, 40,000 pieces of eight, and the value of 10,000 more in jewels. Lolonois sent the vessel presently to Tortuga to be unladed, with orders to return as soon as possible to Savona, where he would wait for them: meanwhile, the rest of the fleet being arrived at Savona, met another Spanish vessel coming from Coman, with military provisions to Hispaniola, and money to pay the garrisons there. This vessel they also took, without any resistance, though mounted with eight guns. In it were 7,000 weight of powder, a great number of muskets, and like things, with 12,000 pieces of eight.

These successes encouraged the pirates, they seeming very lucky beginnings, especially finding their fleet pretty well recruited in a little time: for the first ship arriving at Tortuga, the governor ordered it to be instantly unladen, and soon after sent back, with fresh provisions, and other necessaries, to Lolonois. This ship he chose for himself, and gave that which he commanded to his comrade, Anthony du Puis. Being thus recruited with men in lieu of them he had lost in taking the prizes, and by sickness, he found himself in a good condition to set sail for Maracaibo, in the province of Neuva Venezuela, in the latitude of 12 deg. 10 min. north. This island is twenty leagues long, and twelve broad. To this port also belong the islands of Onega and Monges. The east side thereof is called Cape St. Roman, and the western side Cape of Caquibacoa: the gulf is called, by some, the Gulf of Venezuela, but the pirates usually call it the Bay of Maracaibo.

At the entrance of this gulf are two islands extending from east to west; that towards the east is called Isla de las Vigilias, or the Watch Isle; because in the middle is a high hill, on which stands a watch-house. The other is called Isla de la Palomas, or the Isle of Pigeons. Between these two islands runs a little sea, or rather lake of fresh water, sixty leagues long, and thirty broad; which disgorging itself into the ocean, dilates itself about the said two islands. Between them is the best passage for ships, the channel being no broader than the flight of a great gun, of about eight pounds. On the Isle of Pigeons standeth a castle, to impede the entry of vessels, all being necessitated to come very nigh the castle, by reason of two banks of sand on the other side, with only fourteen feet water. Many other banks of sand there are in this lake; as that called El Tablazo, or the Great Table, no deeper than ten feet, forty leagues within the lake; others there are, that have no more than six, seven, or eight feet in depth: all are very dangerous, especially to mariners unacquainted with them. West hereof is the city of Maracaibo, very pleasant to the view, its houses being built along the shore, having delightful prospects all round: the city may contain three or four thousand persons, slaves included, all which make a town of reasonable bigness. There are judged to be about eight hundred persons able to bear arms, all Spaniards. Here are one parish church, well built and adorned, four monasteries, and one hospital. The city is governed by a deputy governor, substituted by the governor of the Caraccas. The trade here exercised is mostly in hides and tobacco. The inhabitants possess great numbers of cattle, and many plantations, which extend thirty leagues in the country, especially towards the great town of Gibraltar, where are gathered great quantities of cocoa-nuts, and all other garden fruits, which serve for the regale and sustenance of the inhabitants of Maracaibo, whose territories are much drier than those of Gibraltar. Hither those of Maracaibo send great quantities of flesh, they making returns in oranges, lemons, and other fruits; for the inhabitants of Gibraltar want flesh, their fields not being capable of feeding cows or sheep.

Before Maracaibo is a very spacious and secure port, wherein may be built all sorts of vessels, having great convenience of timber, which may be transported thither at little charge. Nigh the town lies also a small island called Borrica, where they feed great numbers of goats, which cattle the inhabitants use more for their skins than their flesh or milk; they slighting these two, unless while they are tender and young kids. In the fields are fed some sheep, but of a very small size. In some islands of the lake, and in other places hereabouts, are many savage Indians, called by the Spaniards bravoes, or wild: these could never be reduced by the Spaniards, being brutish, and untameable. They dwell mostly towards the west side of the lake, in little huts built on trees growing in the water; so to keep themselves from innumerable mosquitoes, or gnats, which infest and torment them night and day. To the east of the said lake are whole towns of fishermen, who likewise live in huts built on trees, as the former. Another reason of this dwelling, is the frequent inundations; for after great rains, the land is often overflown for two or three leagues, there being no less than twenty-five great rivers that feed this lake. The town of Gibraltar is also frequently drowned by these, so that the inhabitants are constrained to retire to their plantations.

Gibraltar, situate at the side of the lake about forty leagues within it, receives its provisions of flesh, as has been said, from Maracaibo. The town is inhabited by about 1,500 persons, whereof four hundred may bear arms; the greatest part of them keep shops, wherein they exercise one trade or another. In the adjacent fields are numerous plantations of sugar and cocoa, in which are many tall and beautiful trees, of whose timber houses may be built, and ships. Among these are many handsome and proportionable cedars, seven or eight feet about, of which they can build boats and ships, so as to bear only one great sail; such vessels being called piraguas. The whole country is well furnished with rivers and brooks, very useful in droughts, being then cut into many little channels to water their fields and plantations. They plant also much tobacco, well esteemed in Europe, and for its goodness is called there tobacco de sacerdotes, or priest's tobacco. They enjoy nigh twenty leagues of jurisdiction, which is bounded by very high mountains perpetually covered with snow. On the other side of these mountains is situate a great city called Merida, to which the town of Gibraltar is subject. All merchandise is carried hence to the aforesaid city on mules, and that but at one season of the year, by reason of the excessive cold in those high mountains. On the said mules returns are made in flour of meal, which comes from towards Peru, by the way of Estaffe.

Thus far I thought good to make a short description of the lake of Maracaibo, that my reader might the better comprehend what I shall say concerning the actions of pirates in this place, as follows.

Lolonois arriving at the gulf of Venezuela, cast anchor with his whole fleet out of sight of the Vigilia or Watch Isle; next day very early he set sail thence with all his ships for the lake of Maracaibo, where they cast anchor again; then they landed their men, with design to attack first the fortress that commanded the bar, therefore called de la barra. This fort consists only of several great baskets of earth placed on a rising ground, planted with sixteen great guns, with several other heaps of earth round about for covering their men: the pirates having landed a league off this fort, advanced by degrees towards it; but the governor having espied their landing, had placed an ambuscade to cut them off behind, while he should attack them in front. This the pirates discovered, and getting before, they defeated it so entirely, that not a man could retreat to the castle: this done, Lolonois, with his companions, advanced immediately to the fort, and after a fight of almost three hours, with the usual desperation of this sort of people, they became masters thereof, without any other arms than swords and pistols: while they were fighting, those who were the routed ambuscade, not being able to get into the castle, retired into Maracaibo in great confusion and disorder, crying "The pirates will presently be here with two thousand men and more." The city having formerly been taken by this kind of people, and sacked to the uttermost, had still an idea of that misery; so that upon these dismal news they endeavoured to escape towards Gibraltar in their boats and canoes, carrying with them all the goods and money they could. Being come to Gibraltar, they told how the fortress was taken, and nothing had been saved, nor any persons escaped.

The castle thus taken by the pirates, they presently signified to the ships their victory, that they should come farther in without fear of danger: the rest of that day was spent in ruining and demolishing the said castle. They nailed the guns, and burnt as much as they could not carry away, burying the dead, and sending on board the fleet the wounded. Next day, very early, they weighed anchor, and steered altogether towards Maracaibo, about six leagues distant from the fort; but the wind failing that day, they could advance little, being forced to expect the tide. Next morning they came in sight of the town, and prepared for landing under the protection of their own guns, fearing the Spaniards might have laid an ambuscade in the woods: they put their men into canoes, brought for that purpose, and landed where they thought most convenient, shooting still furiously with their great guns: of those in the canoes, half only went ashore, the other half remained aboard; they fired from the ships as fast as possible, towards the woody part of the shore, but could discover nobody; then they entered the town, whose inhabitants, as I told you, were retired to the woods, and Gibraltar, with their wives, children, and families. Their houses they left well provided with victuals, as flour, bread, pork, brandy, wines, and poultry, with these the pirates fell to making good cheer, for in four weeks before they had no opportunity of filling their stomachs with such plenty.

They instantly possessed themselves of the best houses in the town, and placed sentinels wherever they thought convenient; the great church served them for their main guard. Next day they sent out an hundred and sixty men to find out some of the inhabitants in the woods thereabouts; these returned the same night, bringing with them 20,000 pieces of eight, several mules laden with household goods and merchandise, and twenty prisoners, men, women, and children. Some of these were put to the rack, to make them confess where they had hid the rest of the goods; but they could extort very little from them. Lolonois, who valued not murdering, though in cold blood, ten or twelve Spaniards, drew his cutlass, and hacked one to pieces before the rest, saying, "If you do not confess and declare where you have hid the rest of your goods, I will do the like to all your companions." At last, amongst these horrible cruelties and inhuman threats, one promised to show the place where the rest of the Spaniards were hid; but those that were fled, having intelligence of it, changed place, and buried the remnant of their riches underground, so that the pirates could not find them out, unless some of their own party should reveal them; besides, the Spaniards flying from one place to another every day, and often changing woods, were jealous even of each other, so as the father durst scarce trust his own son.

After the pirates had been fifteen days in Maracaibo, they resolved for Gibraltar; but the inhabitants having received intelligence thereof, and that they intended afterwards to go to Merida, gave notice of it to the governor there, who was a valiant soldier, and had been an officer in Flanders. His answer was, "he would have them take no care, for he hoped in a little while to exterminate the said pirates." Whereupon he came to Gibraltar with four hundred men well armed, ordering at the same time the inhabitants to put themselves in arms, so that in all he made eight hundred fighting men. With the same speed he raised a battery toward the sea, mounted with twenty guns, covered with great baskets of earth: another battery he placed in another place, mounted with eight guns. This done, he barricaded a narrow passage to the town through which the pirates must pass, opening at the same time another through much dirt and mud into the wood totally unknown to the pirates.

The pirates, ignorant of these preparations, having embarked all their prisoners and booty, took their way towards Gibraltar. Being come in sight of the place, they saw the royal standard hanging forth, and that those of the town designed to defend their houses. Lolonois seeing this, called a council of war what they ought to do, telling his officers and mariners, "That the difficulty of the enterprise was very great, seeing the Spaniards had had so much time to put themselves in a posture of defence, and had got a good body of men together, with much ammunition; but notwithstanding," said he, "have a good courage; we must either defend ourselves like good soldiers, or lose our lives with all the riches we have got. Do as I shall do who am your captain: at other times we have fought with fewer men than we have in our company at present, and yet we have overcome greater numbers than there possibly can be in this town: the more they are, the more glory and the greater riches we shall gain." The pirates supposed that all the riches of the inhabitants of Maracaibo were transported to Gibraltar, or at least the greatest part. After this speech, they all promised to follow, and obey him. Lolonois made answer, "'Tis well; but know ye, withal, that the first man who shall show any fear, or the least apprehension thereof, I will pistol him with my own hands."

With this resolution they cast anchor nigh the shore, near three-quarters of a league from the town: next day before sun-rising, they landed three hundred and eighty men well provided, and armed every one with a cutlass, and one or two pistols, and sufficient powder and bullet for thirty charges. Here they all shook hands in testimony of good courage, and began their march, Lolonois speaking thus, "Come, my brethren, follow me, and have good courage." They followed their guide, who, believing he led them well, brought them to the way which the governor had barricaded. Not being able to pass that way, they went to the other newly made in the wood among the mire, which the Spaniards could shoot into at pleasure; but the pirates, full of courage, cut down the branches of trees and threw them on the way, that they might not stick in the dirt. Meanwhile, those of Gibraltar fired with their great guns so furiously, they could scarce hear nor see for the noise and smoke. Being passed the wood, they came on firm ground, where they met with a battery of six guns, which immediately the Spaniards discharged upon them, all loaded with small bullets and pieces of iron; and the Spaniards sallying forth, set upon them with such fury, as caused the pirates to give way, few of them caring to advance towards the fort, many of them being already killed and wounded. This made them go back to seek another way; but the Spaniards having cut down many trees to hinder the passage, they could find none, but were forced to return to that they had left. Here the Spaniards continued to fire as before, nor would they sally out of their batteries to attack them any more. Lolonois and his companions not being able to grimp up the baskets of earth, were compelled to use an old stratagem, wherewith at last they deceived and overcame the Spaniards.

Lolonois retired suddenly with all his men, making show as if he fled; hereupon the Spaniards crying out "They flee, they flee, let us follow them," sallied forth with great disorder to the pursuit. Being drawn to some distance from the batteries, which was the pirates only design, they turned upon them unexpectedly with sword in hand, and killed above two hundred men; and thus fighting their way through those who remained, they possessed themselves of the batteries. The Spaniards that remained abroad, giving themselves over for lost, fled to the woods: those in the battery of eight guns surrendered themselves, obtaining quarter for their lives. The pirates being now become masters of the town, pulled down the Spanish colours and set up their own, taking prisoners as many as they could find. These they carried to the great church, where they raised a battery of several great guns, fearing lest the Spaniards that were fled should rally, and come upon them again; but next day, being all fortified, their fears were over. They gathered the dead to bury them, being above five hundred Spaniards, besides the wounded in the town, and those that died of their wounds in the woods. The pirates had also above one hundred and fifty prisoners, and nigh five hundred slaves, many women and children.

Of their own companions only forty were killed, and almost eighty wounded, whereof the greatest part died through the bad air, which brought fevers and other illness. They put the slain Spaniards into two great boats, and carrying them a quarter of a league to sea, they sunk the boats; this done, they gathered all the plate, household stuff, and merchandise they could, or thought convenient to carry away. The Spaniards who had anything left had hid it carefully: but the unsatisfied pirates, not contented with the riches they had got, sought for more goods and merchandise, not sparing those who lived in the fields, such as hunters and planters. They had scarce been eighteen days on the place, when the greatest part of the prisoners died for hunger. For in the town were few provisions, especially of flesh, though they had some, but no sufficient quantity of flour of meal, and this the pirates had taken for themselves, as they also took the swine, cows, sheep, and poultry, without allowing any share to the poor prisoners; for these they only provided some small quantity of mules' and asses' flesh; and many who could not eat of that loathsome provision died for hunger, their stomachs not being accustomed to such sustenance. Of the prisoners many also died under the torment they sustained to make them discover their money or jewels; and of these, some had none, nor knew of none, and others denying what they knew, endured such horrible deaths.

Finally, after having been in possession of the town four entire weeks, they sent four of the prisoners to the Spaniards that were fled to the woods, demanding of them a ransom for not burning the town. The sum demanded was 10,000 pieces of eight, which if not sent, they threatened to reduce it to ashes. For bringing in this money, they allowed them only two days; but the Spaniards not having been able to gather so punctually such a sum, the pirates fired many parts of the town; whereupon the inhabitants begged them to help quench the fire, and the ransom should be readily paid. The pirates condescended, helping as much as they could to stop the fire; but, notwithstanding all their best endeavours, one part of the town was ruined, especially the church belonging to the monastery was burnt down. After they had received the said sum, they carried aboard all the riches they had got, with a great number of slaves which had not paid the ransom; for all the prisoners had sums of money set upon them, and the slaves were also commanded to be redeemed. Hence they returned to Maracaibo, where being arrived, they found a general consternation in the whole city, to which they sent three or four prisoners to tell the governor and inhabitants, "they should bring them 30,000 pieces of eight aboard their ships, for a ransom of their houses, otherwise they should be sacked anew and burnt."

Among these debates a party of pirates came on shore, and carried away the images, pictures, and bells of the great church, aboard the fleet. The Spaniards who were sent to demand the sum aforesaid returned, with orders to make some agreement; who concluded with the pirates to give for their ransom and liberty 20,000 pieces of eight, and five hundred cows, provided that they should commit no farther hostilities, but depart thence presently after payment of money and cattle. The one and the other being delivered, the whole fleet set sail, causing great joy to the inhabitants of Maracaibo, to see themselves quit of them: but three days after they renewed their fears with admiration, seeing the pirates appear again, and re-enter the port with all their ships: but these apprehensions vanished, upon hearing one of the pirate's errand, who came ashore from Lolonois, "to demand a skilful pilot to conduct one of the greatest ships over the dangerous bank that lieth at the very entry of the lake." Which petition, or rather command, was instantly granted.

They had now been full two months in those towns, wherein they committed those cruel and insolent actions we have related. Departing thence, they took their course to Hispaniola, and arrived there in eight days, casting anchor in a port called Isla de la Vacca, or Cow Island. This island is inhabited by French bucaniers, who mostly sell the flesh they hunt to pirates and others, who now and then put in there to victual, or trade. Here they unladed their whole cargazon of riches, the usual storehouse of the pirates being commonly under the shelter of the bucaniers. Here they made a dividend of all their prizes and gains, according to the order and degree of every one, as has been mentioned before. Having made an exact calculation of all their plunder, they found in ready money 260,000 pieces of eight: this being divided, every one received for his share in money, as also in silk, linen, and other commodities, to the value of above 100 pieces of eight. Those who had been wounded received their first part, after the rate mentioned before, for the loss of their limbs: then they weighed all the plate uncoined, reckoning ten pieces of eight to a pound; the jewels were prized indifferently, either too high or too low, by reason of their ignorance: this done, every one was put to his oath again, that he had not smuggled anything from the common stock. Hence they proceeded to the dividend of the shares of such as were dead in battle, or otherwise: these shares were given to their friends, to be kept entire for them, and to be delivered in due time to their nearest relations, or their apparent lawful heirs.

The whole dividend being finished, they set sail for Tortuga: here they arrived a month after, to the great joy of most of the island; for as to the common pirates, in three weeks they had scarce any money left, having spent it all in things of little value, or lost it at play. Here had arrived, not long before them, two French ships, with wine and brandy, and suchlike commodities; whereby these liquors, at the arrival of the pirates, were indifferent cheap. But this lasted not long, for soon after they were enhanced extremely, a gallon of brandy being sold for four pieces of eight. The governor of the island bought of the pirates the whole cargo of the ship laden with cocoa, giving for that rich commodity scarce the twentieth part of its worth. Thus they made shift to lose and spend the riches they had got, in much less time than they were purchased: the taverns and stews, according to the custom of pirates, got the greatest part; so that, soon after, they were forced to seek more by the same unlawful means they had got the former.

30 г. до н.э. - 476 г. н.э

С 30 г. до н.э. по 476 г. н.э

Римская (имперская) и поздняя Античность. С конца последнего эллинистического государства, Птолемейского Египта в 30 г. до н.э. до конца Западной Римской империи в 476 г. н.э.

Proistoria.org : History of the World

History of the World. Texts. Images. Contents in English, French, Russian and some other languages

Глава 23

Сквозь ад русской революции. Воспоминания гардемарина. 1914–1919. Глава 23

Гражданская война в России явилась конфликтом непримиримых принципов. Одну сторону конфликта представляли красные, выступавшие за безоговорочную диктатуру пролетариата, другую – белые, считавшие такую диктатуру узурпацией власти и стремившиеся к ее ликвидации. Для тех, кто ясно понимал это, компромисса не существовало, но большинство солдат в обеих армиях не вникали в столь далекие от них проблемы. Обе стороны прибегали к мобилизации крестьян на военную службу и заставляли сражаться за чуждые простым солдатам цели. Находясь между противоборствующими сторонами, русский крестьянин полагался на судьбу и покорно служил в той армии, которая призвала его первой. Оправдания войны белыми и красными казались одинаково неприемлемыми для него, но выбора у него не было. Как правило, солдаты враждующих армий не питали вражды друг к другу и считали противников такими же жертвами обстоятельств, как и сами. Когда призывника захватывала противная сторона, он искренне возмущался, если с ним обращались как с военнопленным. Если же ему позволили служить в армии противника, он очень быстро приспосабливался к новым условиям и воевал не хуже, чем остальные солдаты. Обычно захвату в плен сопутствовали нелепые обстоятельства, а пленники отличались невероятной наивностью. Во время успешной атаки в лесистой местности я однажды наткнулся на раненого красноармейца, лежащего под деревом. Когда я его увидел, солдат принялся кричать: – Не убивайте! Не убивайте! Сдаюсь! Вступаю в Белую армию по собственной воле и желанию! Я опустился возле него на колени и осмотрел рану. Пуля задела кость ноги под правым коленом, но в данный момент физическая боль волновала его меньше.

Chapter XVI

The voyage of the Beagle. Chapter XVI. Northern Chile and Peru

Coast-road to Coquimbo Great Loads carried by the Miners Coquimbo Earthquake Step-formed Terrace Absence of recent Deposits Contemporaneousness of the Tertiary Formations Excursion up the Valley Road to Guasco Deserts Valley of Copiapo Rain and Earthquakes Hydrophobia The Despoblado Indian Ruins Probable Change of Climate River-bed arched by an Earthquake Cold Gales of Wind Noises from a Hill Iquique Salt Alluvium Nitrate of Soda Lima Unhealthy Country Ruins of Callao, overthrown by an Earthquake Recent Subsidence Elevated Shells on San Lorenzo, their decomposition Plain with embedded Shells and fragments of Pottery Antiquity of the Indian Race APRIL 27th.—I set out on a journey to Coquimbo, and thence through Guasco to Copiapo, where Captain Fitz Roy kindly offered to pick me up in the Beagle. The distance in a straight line along the shore northward is only 420 miles; but my mode of travelling made it a very long journey. I bought four horses and two mules, the latter carrying the luggage on alternate days. The six animals together only cost the value of twenty-five pounds sterling, and at Copiapo I sold them again for twenty-three. We travelled in the same independent manner as before, cooking our own meals, and sleeping in the open air. As we rode towards the Vino del Mar, I took a farewell view of Valparaiso, and admired its picturesque appearance. For geological purposes I made a detour from the high road to the foot of the Bell of Quillota.

Глава 12

Борьба за Красный Петроград. Глава 12

Колоссальную работу по обороне Петрограда выполняла коммунистическая партия. Петроградские городской и губернский комитеты РКП(б) приняли все меры к тому, чтобы обеспечить перелом на ближайшем фронте и наряду с этим подготовить город к обороне изнутри. На призыв Петрограда откликнулись не только ближайшие губернские комитеты партии, но и более отдаленные. Посильная помощь оказывалась со всех сторон. Под непосредственным руководством партии проходила вся работа внутренней обороны города: коммунисты, поставленные под ружье с первых же дней поражения полевых частей Красной армии, явились той внутренней силой, на которую ложилась тяжелая обязанность встретить противника в случае его вторжения в пределы города. В последующие дни октября коммунисты играли роль связующего звена, цементировали районные отряды внутренней обороны, поднимали боевое настроение бойцов отряда, выполняли самые трудные и сложные задания по обороне города. Наряду с мужчинами-партийцами принимали активное участие и [415] женщины — члены партии, роль которых, как и работниц вообще, отмечалась выше в связи с деятельностью районов. Значительная часть коммунистов пошла на усиление полевых частей Красной армии и, принимая участие в целом ряде боев на фронте с Северо-западной армией, показывала пример стойкости и героизма. Общую картину состояния организации г. Петрограда в 1919 г. можно восстановить только по тем статистическим данным, которые были результатом произведенной в январе 1920 г. переписи наличного состава членов Петроградской организации по спискам коллективов и при проверке членских карточек, но без непосредственного опроса членов организации.

Chapter XIII

The pirates of Panama or The buccaneers of America : Chapter XIII

Captain Morgan goes to Hispaniola to equip a new fleet, with intent to pillage again on the coast of the West Indies. CAPTAIN MORGAN perceived now that Fortune favoured him, by giving success to all his enterprises, which occasioned him, as is usual in human affairs, to aspire to greater things, trusting she would always be constant to him. Such was the burning of Panama, wherein Fortune failed not to assist him, as she had done before, though she had led him thereto through a thousand difficulties. The history hereof I shall now relate, being so remarkable in all its circumstances, as peradventure nothing more deserving memory will be read by future ages. Captain Morgan arriving at Jamaica, found many of his officers and soldiers reduced to their former indigency, by their vices and debaucheries. Hence they perpetually importuned him for new exploits. Captain Morgan, willing to follow Fortune's call, stopped the mouths of many inhabitants of Jamaica, who were creditors to his men for large sums, with the hopes and promises of greater achievements than ever, by a new expedition. This done, he could easily levy men for any enterprise, his name being so famous through all those islands as that alone would readily bring him in more men than he could well employ. He undertook therefore to equip a new fleet, for which he assigned the south side of Tortuga as a place of rendezvous, writing letters to all the expert pirates there inhabiting, as also to the governor, and to the planters and hunters of Hispaniola, informing them of his intentions, and desiring their appearance, if they intended to go with him.

Chapter II

The voyage of the Beagle. Chapter II. Rio de Janeiro

Rio de Janeiro Excursion north of Cape Frio Great Evaporation Slavery Botofogo Bay Terrestrial Planariae Clouds on the Corcovado Heavy Rain Musical Frogs Phosphorescent Insects Elater, springing powers of Blue Haze Noise made by a Butterfly Entomology Ants Wasp killing a Spider Parasitical Spider Artifices of an Epeira Gregarious Spider Spider with an unsymmetrical Web APRIL 4th to July 5th, 1832.—A few days after our arrival I became acquainted with an Englishman who was going to visit his estate, situated rather more than a hundred miles from the capital, to the northward of Cape Frio. I gladly accepted his kind offer of allowing me to accompany him. April 8th.—Our party amounted to seven. The first stage was very interesting. The day was powerfully hot, and as we passed through the woods, everything was motionless, excepting the large and brilliant butterflies, which lazily fluttered about. The view seen when crossing the hills behind Praia Grande was most beautiful; the colours were intense, and the prevailing tint a dark blue; the sky and the calm waters of the bay vied with each other in splendour. After passing through some cultivated country, we entered a forest, which in the grandeur of all its parts could not be exceeded. We arrived by midday at Ithacaia; this small village is situated on a plain, and round the central house are the huts of the negroes. These, from their regular form and position, reminded me of the drawings of the Hottentot habitations in Southern Africa.

Глава XII

Путешествие натуралиста вокруг света на корабле «Бигль». Глава XII. Среднее Чили

Вальпараисо Экскурсия к подножию Анд Строение местности Восхождение на Колокольную гору Кильоты Раздробленные глыбы зеленокаменной породы Громадные долины Рудники Положение горняков Сант-Яго Каукнесские горячие воды Золотые прииски Мельницы, для руды Продырявленные камни Повадки пумы Тюрко и тапаколо Колибри 23 июля. — Поздней ночью «Бигль» бросил якорь в заливе Вальпа раисо — главном морском порте Чили. С наступлением утра все показалось нам восхитительным. После Огненной Земли климат Вальпараисо был просто чудесен: воздух такой сухой, небо ясное и синее, солнце сияет так ярко, что кажется, будто жизнь так и брызжет отовсюду. С якорной стоянки открывается прелестный вид. Город выстроен у самого подножия цепи довольно крутых холмов вышиной около 1 600 футов. Из-за такого расположения он состоит из одной длинной, широко раскинувшейся улицы, идущей парал лельно берегу, и каждый раз, когда по дороге встречается овраг, дома громоздятся по обоим его склонам. Округленные холмы, лишь частично покрытые очень скудной растительностью, изрыты бесчи сленными лощинками, в которых обнажается необыкновенно яркого красного цвета почва. Все это, а также низенькие выбеленные дома с черепичными крышами вызвали в моей памяти Сайта-Крус на Тене рифе. В северо-восточном направлении кое-где отчетливо виднеются Анды; но с окрестных холмов эти горы кажутся гораздо более вели чественными: оттуда лучше ощущается то огромное расстояние, на котором они находятся. Особенно великолепен вулкан Аконкагуа.

3. Продажа

Записки «вредителя». Часть IV. Работа в «Рыбпроме». Подготовка к побегу. 3. Продажа

Жизнь моя в концентрационном лагере складывалась необыкновенно удачно. Мне как-то непонятно везло. Множество весьма квалифицированных специалистов не попадало в лагере на работу по своей специальности — я был назначен, через месяц по прибытии в лагерь, на должность ихтиолога; через два месяца после этого послан в длительную и совершенно необычную для лагеря «исследовательскую» поездку, тогда как огромное большинство годами сидели, ничего не видя, кроме казарм и помещения, в котором им приходилось работать. Мне было разрешено, ровно через шесть месяцев по прибытии в лагерь, свидание с женой и сыном. Наконец, не прошло и двух месяцев после отъезда жены, как у меня была вновь крупная удача — меня «продали», или, точнее, сдали в аренду на три месяца. Продажа специалистов, широко применявшаяся в концентрационных лагерях в период 1928–1930 годов, была прекращена в начале 1931 года. Все проданные специалисты были возвращены в концентрационные лагеря. Видимо, это было общее распоряжение центра, вызванное проводившейся в 1930 году за границей кампании против принудительного труда в СССР. За время моего пребывания в концентрационном лагере в 1931 и 1932 годах я знаю только три случая продажи специалистов из Соловецкого лагеря. Осенью 1931 года был продан один юрист на должность консультанта в государственное учреждение в Петрозаводск, и я, совместно с ученым специалистом по рыбоведению К.

Глава 25

Сквозь ад русской революции. Воспоминания гардемарина. 1914–1919. Глава 25

В августе 1919 года верховное командование красных решило покончить с Северо-западной армией, которая в это время приблизилась на опасное расстояние к Петрограду. На позициях красных за линией фронта наблюдались признаки повышенной активности, пленные сообщали о ежедневном прибытии на фронт свежих красных дивизий. Мы ожидали крупного наступления каждое утро и пытались предотвратить главный удар. Но еще до того, как красные выбрали время для его нанесения, мы получили приказ штаба о всеобщем отступлении. Большинство железнодорожных путей и шоссе между Петроградом и границей Эстонии тянулись по прямой линии с востока на запад, но по каким-то непонятным причинам было приказано оставить главные пути и отступать в юго-западном направлении. Лишь бронепоезда были вынуждены двигаться на запад по основному пути на Ямбург, нам дали указания обеспечивать их свободное прохождение до тех пор, пока последняя воинская часть не перейдет железнодорожное полотно с севера. Во время отступления нервозность всегда достигает апогея, все становится возможным, когда войска перемещаются по проселочным дорогам в стороне от известных им ориентиров. Когда белые пехотинцы отступили за железнодорожные пути, противник совершил рывок вперед вдоль прибрежного шоссе, тянувшегося параллельно железной дороге. На другой день мы все еще находились на расстоянии примерно 50 миль к востоку от Ямбурга и стояли перед угрозой быть отрезанными от своей базы.

4. Вечеракша

Записки «вредителя». Часть III. Концлагерь. 4. Вечеракша

Конвойный привел меня в общий пассажирский вагон железнодорожной ветки, соединяющей Попов остров со станцией Кемь, и сел на лавочку рядом со мной, зажав винтовку между колен В вагоне было много пассажиров: рабочих с лесопильного завода, местных крестьян, баб, ребятишек. Никто на меня не обращал внимания, так здесь все привыкли к арестантам-«услоновцам». В Кеми заключенных больше, чем жителей. Но мне казалась странной и моя фигура, переряженная в каторжные отрепья, и мое присутствие среди вольных людей с их обычными житейскими разговорами Особенно поражали меня дети, которых я не видел давно. Хотелось заговорить со славным белобрысым мальчонкой, который сидел против и косился на меня своими лукавыми глазенками, но за такой разговор — «нелегальное сношение с вольными» — мне грозил карцер. В открытое окно я видел болото, мелкий лес. Тоскливые, унылые места, но ни одного человека. Полтора года пробыл я в концлагере и полтора года, начиная с этапа, я всюду думал об одном — о побеге. Во всяком новом положении или месте я прежде всего думал, как это может повлиять на мой план побега, можно ли и как лучше бежать отсюда. И теперь, глядя в окно, я старался представить себе, можно ли бежать с поезда. В конце концов, может быть, если выбрать момент, соскочить на ходу... Конвойный вряд ли решится прыгнуть тоже. Он будет стрелять, но из-за хода поезда, наверное, промажет. Лесок кругом чахлый, но скрыться можно... В это время я заметил, что вдоль железнодорожного пути тянется дорога, и по ней за нашим поездом скачет верховой с ружьем.

1991 - [ ... ]

From 1991 to the present day

From the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991 to the present day.