Chapter II


A description of Tortuga
The fruits and plants there
How the French first settled there, at two several times, and forced out the Spaniards
The author twice sold in the said island.


THE island of Tortuga is situate on the north side of Hispaniola, in 20 deg. 30 min. latitude; its just extent is threescore leagues about. The Spaniards, who gave name to this island, called it so from the shape of the land, in some manner resembling a great sea-tortoise, called by them Tortuga-de-mar. The country is very mountainous, and full of rocks, and yet thick of lofty trees, that grow upon the hardest of those rocks, without partaking of a softer soil. Hence it comes that their roots, for the greatest part, are seen naked, entangled among the rocks like the branching of ivy against our walls. That part of this island which stretches to the north is totally uninhabited: the reason is, first, because it is incommodious, and unhealthy: and, secondly, for the ruggedness of the coast, that gives no access to the shore, unless among rocks almost inaccessible: for this cause it is peopled only on the south part, which hath only one port indifferently good: yet this harbour has two entries, or channels, which afford passage to ships of seventy guns; the port itself being without danger, and capable of receiving a great number of vessels. The inhabited parts, of which the first is called the Low-Lands, or Low-Country: this is the chief among the rest, because it contains the port aforesaid. The town is called Cayona, and here live the chiefest and richest planters of the island. The second part is called the Middle Plantation: its soil is yet almost new, being only known to be good for tobacco. The third is named Ringot, and is situate towards the west part of the island. The fourth and last is called the Mountain, in which place were made the first plantations upon this island.

As to the wood that grows here, we have already said that the trees are exceeding tall, and pleasing to the sight; whence no man will doubt, but they may be applied to several uses. Such is the yellow saunder, which by the inhabitants is called bois de chandel, or, in English, candle-wood, because it burns like a candle, and serves them with light while they fish by night. Here grows, also, lingnum sanctum, or guaiacum: its virtues are very well known, more especially to those who observe not the Seventh Commandment, and are given to impure copulations!—physicians drawing hence, in several compositions, the greatest antidote for venereal diseases; as also for cold and viscous humours. The trees, likewise, which afford gummi elemi, grow here in great abundance; as doth radix Chinæ, or China root: yet this is not so good as that of other parts of the western world. It is very white and soft, and serves for pleasant food to the wild boars, when they can find nothing else. This island, also, is not deficient in aloes, nor an infinite number of the other medicinal herbs, which may please the curiosity of such as are given to their contemplation: moreover, for building of ships, or any other sort of architecture, here are found several sorts of timber. The fruits, likewise, which grow here abundantly, are nothing inferior, in quantity or quality, to what other islands produce. I shall name only some of the most ordinary and common: such are magnoit, potatoes, Abajou apples, yannas, bacones, paquays, carosoles, mamayns, annananes, and divers other sorts, which I omit to specify. Here grow likewise, in great numbers, those trees called palmitoes, or palmites, whence is drawn a certain juice which serves the inhabitants instead of wine, and whose leaves cover their houses instead of tiles.

In this island aboundeth, also, the wild boar. The governor hath prohibited the hunting of them with dogs, fearing lest, the island being but small, the whole race of them, in a short time, should be destroyed. The reason why he thought convenient to preserve these wild beasts was, that, in case of any invasion, the inhabitants might sustain themselves with their food, especially were they once constrained to retire to the woods and mountains. Yet this sort of game is almost impeded by itself, by reason of the many rocks and precipices, which, for the greatest part, are covered with little shrubs, very green and thick; whence the huntsmen have oftentimes fallen, and left us the sad remembrance of many a memorable disaster.

At a certain time of the year there resort to Tortuga large flocks of wild pigeons, and then the inhabitants feed on them very plentifully, having more than they can consume, and leaving totally to their repose all other sorts of fowl, both wild and tame; that so, in the absence of the pigeons, these may supply their place. But as nothing in the universe, though never so pleasant, can be found, but what hath something of bitterness with it; the very symbol of this truth we see in the aforesaid pigeons: for these, the season being past, can scarce be touched with the tongue, they become so extremely lean, and bitter even to admiration. The reason of this bitterness is attributed to a certain seed which they eat about that time, even as bitter as gall. About the sea-shores, everywhere, are found great multitudes of crabs, both of land and sea, and both sorts very big. These are good to feed servants and slaves, whose palates they please, but are very hurtful to the sight: besides, being eaten too often, they cause great giddiness in the head, with much weakness of the brain; so that, very frequently, they are deprived of sight for a quarter of an hour.

The French having settled in the isle of St. Christopher, planted there a sort of trees, of which, at present, there possibly may be greater quantities; with the timber whereof they made long-boats, and hoys, which they sent thence westward, well manned and victualled, to discover other islands. These setting sail from St. Christopher, came within sight of Hispaniola, where they arrived with abundance of joy. Having landed, they marched into the country, where they found large quantities of cattle; such as cows, bulls, horses, and wild boars: but finding no great profit in these animals, unless they could enclose them, and knowing, likewise, the island to be pretty well peopled by the Spaniards, they thought it convenient to enter upon and seize the island of Tortuga. This they performed without any difficulty, there being upon the island no more than ten or twelve Spaniards to guard it. These few men let the French come in peaceably, and possess the island for six months, without any trouble; meanwhile they passed and repassed, with their canoes, to Hispaniola, from whence they transported many people, and at last began to plant the whole island of Tortuga. The few Spaniards remaining there, perceiving the French to increase their number daily, began, at last, to repine at their prosperity, and grudge them the possession: hence they gave notice to others of their nation, their neighbours, who sent several boats, well armed and manned, to dispossess the French. This expedition succeeded according to their desires; for the new possessors, seeing the great number of Spaniards, fled with all they had to the woods, and hence, by night, they wafted over with canoes to the island of Hispaniola: this they the more easily performed, having no women or children with them, nor any great substance to carry away. Here they also retired into the woods, both to seek for food, and from thence, with secrecy, to give intelligence to others of their own faction; judging for certain, that within a little while they should be in a capacity to hinder the Spaniards from fortifying in Tortuga.

Meanwhile, the Spaniards of the great island ceased not to seek after their new guests, the French, with intent to root them out of the woods if possible, or cause them to perish with hunger; but this design soon failed, having found that the French were masters both of good guns, powder, and bullets. Here therefore the fugitives waited for a certain opportunity, wherein they knew the Spaniards were to come from Tortuga with arms, and a great number of men, to join with those of the greater island for their destruction. When this occasion offered, they in the meanwhile deserting the woods where they were, returned to Tortuga, and dispossessed the small number of Spaniards that remained at home. Having so done, they fortified themselves the best they could, thereby to prevent the return of the Spaniards in case they should attempt it. Moreover, they sent immediately to the governor of St. Christopher's, craving his aid and relief, and demanding of him a governor, the better to be united among themselves, and strengthened on all occasions. The governor of St. Christopher's received their petition with much satisfaction, and, without delay, sent Monsieur le Passeur to them in quality of a governor, together with a ship full of men, and all necessaries for their establishment and defence. No sooner had they received this recruit, but the governor commanded a fortress to be built upon the top of a high rock, from whence he could hinder the entrance of any ships or other vessels to the port. To this fort no other access could be had, than by almost climbing through a very narrow passage that was capable only of receiving two persons at once, and those not without difficulty. In the middle of this rock was a great cavity, which now serves for a storehouse: besides, here was great convenience for raising a battery. The fort being finished, the governor commanded two guns to be mounted, which could not be done without great toil and labour; as also a house to be built within the fort, and afterwards the narrow way, that led to the said fort, to be broken and demolished, leaving no other ascent thereto than by a ladder. Within the fort gushes out a plentiful fountain of pure fresh water, sufficient to refresh a garrison of a thousand men. Being possessed of these conveniences, and the security these things might promise, the French began to people the island, and each of them to seek their living; some by hunting, others by planting tobacco, and others by cruizing and robbing upon the coasts of the Spanish islands, which trade is continued by them to this day.

The Spaniards, notwithstanding, could not behold, but with jealous eyes, the daily increase of the French in Tortuga, fearing lest, in time, they might by them be dispossessed also of Hispaniola. Thus taking an opportunity (when many of the French were abroad at sea, and others employed in hunting), with eight hundred men, in several canoes, they landed again in Tortuga, almost without being perceived by the French; but finding that the governor had cut down many trees for the better discovery of any enemy in case of an assault, as also that nothing of consequence could be done without great guns, they consulted about the fittest place for raising a battery. This place was soon concluded to be the top of a mountain which was in sight, seeing that from thence alone they could level their guns at the fort, which now lay open to them since the cutting down of the trees by the new possessors. Hence they resolved to open a way for the carriage of some pieces of ordnance to the top. This mountain is somewhat high, and the upper part thereof plain, from whence the whole island may be viewed: the sides thereof are very rugged, by reason a great number of inaccessible rocks do surround it; so that the ascent was very difficult, and would always have been the same, had not the Spaniards undergone the immense labour and toil of making the way before mentioned, as I shall now relate.

The Spaniards had with them many slaves and Indians, labouring men, whom they call matades, or, in English, half-yellow men; these they ordered with iron tools to dig a way through the rocks. This they performed with the greatest speed imaginable; and through this way, by the help of many ropes and pulleys, they at last made shift to get up two pieces of ordnance, wherewith they made a battery next day, to play on the fort. Meanwhile, the French knowing these designs, prepared for a defence (while the Spaniards were busy about the battery) sending notice everywhere to their companions for help. Thus the hunters of the island all joined together, and with them all the pirates who were not already too far from home. These landed by night at Tortuga, lest they should be seen by the Spaniards; and, under the same obscurity of the night, they all together, by a back way, climbed the mountain where the Spaniards were posted, which they did the more easily being acquainted with these rocks. They came up at the very instant that the Spaniards, who were above, were preparing to shoot at the fort, not knowing in the least of their coming. Here they set upon them at their backs with such fury as forced the greatest part to precipitate themselves from the top to the bottom, and dash their bodies in pieces: few or none escaped; for if any remained alive, they were put to the sword. Some Spaniards did still keep the bottom of the mountain; but these, hearing the shrieks and cries of them that were killed, and believing some tragical revolution to be above, fled immediately towards the sea, despairing ever to regain the island of Tortuga.

The governors of this island behaved themselves as proprietors and absolute lords thereof till 1664, when the West-India company of France took possession thereof, and sent thither, for their governor, Monsieur Ogeron. These planted the colony for themselves by their factors and servants, thinking to drive some considerable trade from thence with the Spaniards, even as the Hollanders do from Curacao: but this design did not answer; for with other nations they could drive no trade, by reason they could not establish any secure commerce from the beginning with their own; forasmuch as at the first institution of this company in France they agreed with the pirates, hunters, and planters, first possessors of Tortuga, that these should buy all their necessaries from the said company upon trust. And though this agreement was put in execution, yet the factors of the company soon after found that they could not recover either monies or returns from those people, that they were constrained to bring some armed men into the island, in behalf of the company, to get in some of their payments. But neither this endeavour, nor any other, could prevail towards the settling a second trade with those of the island. Hereupon, the company recalled their factors, giving them orders to sell all that was their own in the said plantation, both the servants belonging to the company (which were sold, some for twenty, and others for thirty pieces of eight), as also all other merchandizes and proprieties. And thus all their designs fell to the ground.

On this occasion I was also sold, being a servant under the said company in whose service I left France: but my fortune was very bad, for I fell into the hands of the most cruel and perfidious man that ever was born, who was then governor, or rather lieutenant-general, of that island. This man treated me with all the hard usage imaginable, yea, with that of hunger, with which I thought I should have perished inevitably. Withal, he was willing to let me buy my freedom and liberty, but not under the rate of three hundred pieces of eight, I not being master of one at a time in the world. At last, through the manifold miseries I endured, as also affliction of mind, I was thrown into a dangerous sickness. This misfortune, added to the rest, was the cause of my happiness: for my wicked master, seeing my condition, began to fear lest he should lose his monies with my life. Hereupon he sold me a second time to a surgeon, for seventy pieces of eight. Being with this second master, I began soon to recover my health through the good usage I received, he being much more humane and civil than my first patron. He gave me both clothes and very good food; and after I had served him but one year, he offered me my liberty, with only this condition, that I should pay him one hundred pieces of eight when I was in a capacity so to do; which kind proposal of his I could not but accept with infinite joy and gratitude.

Being now at liberty, though like Adam when he was first created—that is, naked and destitute of all human necessaries—not knowing how to get my living, I determined to enter into the order of the pirates or robbers at sea. Into this society I was received with common consent, both of the superior and vulgar sort, where I continued till 1672. Having assisted them in all their designs and attempts, and served them in many notable exploits (of which hereafter I shall give the reader a true account), I returned to my own native country. But before I begin my relation, I shall say something of the island Hispaniola, which lies towards the western part of America; as also give my reader a brief description thereof, according to my slender ability and experience.

5. Дальнейшие поиски. Обнаружение тела Рустема Слободина

Перевал Дятлова. Смерть, идущая по следу... 5. Дальнейшие поиски. Обнаружение тела Рустема Слободина

Вермёмся, впрочем, к хронике событий на перевале. 5 марта, на следующий день после анатомирования в Ивделе найденных тел, был обнаружен труп Рустема Слободина. Тело находилось на склоне Холат-Сяхыл почти по середине пути между точками, в которых ранее нашли трупы Зины Колмогоровой и Игоря Дятлова. По оценке следователя до того места, где упала Колмогорова расстояние не превышало 150 м. вверх по склону, а того, где погиб Дятлов - 180 м. вниз. Слободин лежал практически на прямой линии от палатки к кедру, подобно своим товарищам, найденным прежде на склоне. Схема, демонстрирующая взаимное расположение тел погибших туристов, найденных в феврале-марте 1959 г. Условные обозначения: "^" - палатка группы Дятлова на восточном склоне Холат-Сяхыл, "L"- кедр над четвёртым притоком Лозьвы, "+1-2"- место обнаружения трупов Георгия Кривонищенко и Юрия Дорошенко, "+3"- положение трупа Игоря Дятлова (примерно в 400 м. от кедра), "+4"- положение тела Зины Колмогоровой на склоне Холат-Сяхыл (по приблизительной оценке прокурора В.И.Темпалова примерно в 500 м. от тела Дятлова), "+5"- место, где был найден труп Рустема Слободина. Тело находилось под слоем снега толщиною 12-15 см. и было ориентировано головою вверх по склону.

Предисловие

Сквозь ад русской революции. Воспоминания гардемарина. 1914–1919. Предисловие

«...Как это часто бывает в истории, наши чувства склоняются на сторону тех, чье поражение мы должны считать, тем не менее, идущим во благо». Джон Адамс Дойль. «Английские колонии в Америке» Это краткое напутствие предназначено для тех, кто приступает к чтению с полной уверенностью в моей пристрастности. Хотелось бы напомнить, что никто не в состоянии дать совершенно объективное описание собственной жизни, как бы ни желал этого. Личные впечатления не всегда поддаются объяснению, но во многом определяются окружающей этого человека средой: семьей, друзьями, строем жизни – словом, всем, что формирует личность, всем, что влияет на нее на протяжении ее пути. В данном случае речь идет о моем восприятии дореволюционной России. Я знаю, что в стране было много несправедливости, что определенные социальные группы страдали от произвола царской власти. Тем не менее мне повезло быть членом семьи, жившей в более комфортных, благоприятных условиях, поэтому мое отношение к дореволюционной жизни в России достаточно позитивно. Столь очевидные противоречия заставляют меня признать свои ограниченные возможности и убеждают в том, что окончательную оценку революции следует оставить будущему поколению, которое сможет быть более объективным. У меня же нет желания делать окончательные выводы или пытаться проводить сравнения старого и нового. Эти страницы просто посвящены истории болезни общества – тем событиям, которые я наблюдал в то время и в которых участвовал.

Eneolithic

Eneolithic : from 5000 to 3300 BC

Eneolithic : from 5000 to 3300 BC.

Chapter VI

The voyage of the Beagle. Chapter VI. Bahia Blanca to Buenos Ayres

Set out for Buenos Ayres Rio Sauce Sierra Ventana Third Posta Driving Horses Bolas Partridges and Foxes Features of the Country Long-legged Plover Teru-tero Hail-storm Natural Enclosures in the Sierra Tapalguen Flesh of Puma Meat Diet Guardia del Monte Effects of Cattle on the Vegetation Cardoon Buenos Ayres Corral where Cattle are Slaughtered SEPTEMBER 18th.—I hired a Gaucho to accompany me on my ride to Buenos Ayres, though with some difficulty, as the father of one man was afraid to let him go, and another, who seemed willing, was described to me as so fearful, that I was afraid to take him, for I was told that even if he saw an ostrich at a distance, he would mistake it for an Indian, and would fly like the wind away. The distance to Buenos Ayres is about four hundred miles, and nearly the whole way through an uninhabited country. We started early in the morning; ascending a few hundred feet from the basin of green turf on which Bahia Blanca stands, we entered on a wide desolate plain. It consists of a crumbling argillaceo-calcareous rock, which, from the dry nature of the climate, supports only scattered tufts of withered grass, without a single bush or tree to break the monotonous uniformity. The weather was fine, but the atmosphere remarkably hazy; I thought the appearance foreboded a gale, but the Gauchos said it was owing to the plain, at some great distance in the interior, being on fire. After a long gallop, having changed horses twice, we reached the Rio Sauce: it is a deep, rapid, little stream, not above twenty-five feet wide.

IX. План побега

Побег из ГУЛАГа. Часть 2. IX. План побега

Второй раз встретиться было легче: сквозь тягость и прошлого, и настоящего нет-нет да пробивалась радость. Одно то, что мы сидели втроем за столом, ели вместе, волновало до слез. Так невероятно далеко по времени отстояло это простое счастье — быть рядом, не страшась, что смерть в любой день может отнять, по крайней мере, одного или двух из нас троих. После ужина мальчика уложили спать. От привезенных вещей — чашек, чайника, еще каких-то пустяков маячил призрак дома. Но, когда мальчик уснул и все в доме стихло, муж стал беспокоен. Вспомнил он или хотел спросить о чем-нибудь? Мне становилось не по себе, но он молчал, и страшно было вмешиваться в его мысли. Слишком много мы оба вынесли, чтобы с легкостью можно было раскрыть пережитое. — У меня безумная мысль, — заговорил он, наконец, глухо, еле слышно. — Бежать. Помнишь, перед арестом? — Да. — Это безумие? У меня кружилась голова, я не сразу смогла ответить. — Может быть, да, безумие, а может быть, это единственный выход. — Я все обдумал. Слушай. Дай листок бумаги и карандаш. Молча, быстро, точно он начертил западный берег Белого моря, заливы, губы, озера, реку, уходящую истоками на запад, линию железной дороги, несколько станций. — Вы приезжаете летом на свидание в Кандалакшу. Сделаю так, чтобы меня сюда послали. Если я напишу в письме что-нибудь о юге, значит, ничего не выходит; если о севере, значит, все хорошо.

Примечания

Борьба за Красный Петроград. Примечания

{1} Везде в не оговоренных случаях курсив в цитатах наш. — Н. К. {2} В октябре 1917 г. Главное артиллерийское управление «своим попечением» направило в Новочеркасский артиллерийский склад 10 000 винтовок из Петрограда и 12 800 винтовок из Москвы. Как первая, так и вторая партия оружия по назначению не дошли. Поэтому генерал М. В. Алексеев предлагал вновь дать наряд, значительно его увеличив — до 30 000 винтовок, и то на первое время. {3} Белое дело. Берлин: Изд-во «Медный всадник», 1926. Т. 1. С. 77–82. В этих последних заключительных словах генерала нельзя не отметить некоторой доли сомнения в своих начинаниях; ясная перспектива, нарисованная им, дала под конец основательную трещину. Фантазия, пленившая его в кабинете, должна была уступить хотя и незначительное, но все же заключительное место для соображении практического характера. Несколько позже, 9 февраля (27 января) 1918 г., генерал М. В. Алексеев в своем обращении во французскую миссию в г. Киеве вынужден был подтвердить свое заключение из цитированного выше письма от 8(21) ноября 1917 г. Он писал: «Идеи большевизма нашли приверженцев среди широкой массы казаков. Они не желают сражаться даже для защиты собственной территории, ради спасения своего достояния. Они глубоко убеждены, что большевизм направлен только против богатых классов — буржуазии и интеллигенции, а не против области, где сохранился порядок, где есть хлеб, уголь, железо, нефть» (Владимирова В. Год службы «социалистов» капиталистам: Очерки по истории контрреволюции в 1918 г./ Под ред. Я. А.

Конституция (Основной закон) Союза Советских Социалистических Республик - 1936 год

Конституция (Основной закон) Союза Советских Социалистических Республик. Утверждена постановлением Чрезвычайного VIII Съезда Советов Союза Советских Социалистических Республик от 5 декабря 1936 года

Глава I Общественное устройство Статья 1. Союз Советских Социалистических Республик есть социалистическое государство рабочих и крестьян. Статья 2. Политическую основу СССР составляют Советы депутатов трудящихся, выросшие и окрепшие в результате свержения власти помещиков и капиталистов и завоевания диктатуры пролетариата. Статья 3. Вся власть в СССР принадлежит трудящимся города и деревни в лице Советов депутатов трудящихся. Статья 4. Экономическую основу СССР составляют социалистическая система хозяйства и социалистическая собственность на орудия и средства производства, утвердившиеся в результате ликвидации капиталистической системы хозяйства, отмены частной собственности на орудия и средства производства и уничтожения эксплуатации человека человеком. Статья 5. Социалистическая собственность в СССР имеет либо форму государственной собственности (всенародное достояние), либо форму кооперативно-колхозной собственности (собственность отдельных колхозов, собственность кооперативных объединений). Статья 6. Земля, ее недра, воды, леса, заводы, фабрики, шахты, рудники, железнодорожный, водный и воздушный транспорт, банки, средства связи, организованные государством крупные сельскохозяйственные предприятия (совхозы, машинно-тракторные станции и т. п.), а также коммунальные предприятия и основной жилищный фонд в городах и промышленных пунктах являются государственной собственностью, то есть всенародным достоянием. Статья 7.

Новое время

Новое время : период с 1492 по 1918 год

Новое время : период с 1492 по 1918 год.

Глава 11

Сквозь ад русской революции. Воспоминания гардемарина. 1914–1919. Глава 11

Возвратившись в город после двухмесячного отсутствия, я смотрел на Петроград глазами постороннего. Впечатление было безрадостным и мрачным. В морозные мартовские дни Петроград выглядел шумным, необузданным, румяным парнем, полным сил и эгоистических надежд. Знойным, душным августом Петроград казался истасканным, преждевременно состарившимся человеком неопределенного возраста, с мешками под глазами и душой, из которой подозрения и страхи выхолостили отвагу и решимость. Чужими выглядели неопрятные здания, грязные тротуары, лица людей на улицах. Обескураживало больше всего то, что происходившее в Петрограде выражало состояние всей страны. В последние годы старого режима Россия начала скольжение по наклонной плоскости. Мартовская революция высвободила силы, повлекшие страну дальше вниз. Она вступила в последнюю стадию падения. Заключительный этап распада пришелся на период между маем и октябрем 1917 года. В это время главным актером на политической сцене был Керенский. Как государственный деятель и лидер страны он был слишком ничтожен, чтобы влиять на ход событий. Сложившимся за рубежом мнением о значимости своей персоны он обязан рекламе. Представители союзнических правительств и пресса связывали с ним последнюю надежду на спасение России. Чтобы подбодрить себя, они представляли Керенского сильным, энергичным, умным патриотом, способным повернуть вспять неблагоприятное течение событий и превратить Россию в надежного военного союзника. Однако образованные люди России не обманывались. В начале марта рассказывали о первом дне пребывания Керенского на посту министра юстиции.

Часть II. Восстановление подводного плавания страны (1920-1934 гг.) [81]

Короли подплава в море червонных валетов. Часть II. Восстановление подводного плавания страны (1920–1934 гг.)

2. В камере

Записки «вредителя». Часть II. Тюрьма. 2. В камере

Часть стены общей камеры, выходящей в коридор, забрана решеткой от потолка почти до полу. Решетка массивная и довольно редкая, головы просунуть нельзя, но руки можно. Как в зверинцах — для львов и тигров. Дверь такая же решетчатая. Работа солидная, добросовестная — «проклятое наследие царизма», столь пригодившееся в Союзе Советских Социалистических Республик. В камере полумрак, и трудно разобрать, что там делается. На стук открываемой двери с ближайшей койки поднялся человек в белье и, не обращая на меня внимания, заговорил с надзирателем с упреком в голосе. — Товарищ Прокофьев (фамилия надзирателя), вы обещали нам больше не давать, мне некуда класть. В двадцатой нет ста человек, а у нас сто восемь. — В двадцатую тоже даем, — ответил равнодушно надзиратель, поворачивая ключ в огромном замке. — Раздевайтесь, товарищ, — обратился ко мне человек в белье. — Пальто повесьте здесь. — Он указал на гвоздь у самой двери, на котором уже висела такая масса пальто, шуб, шинелей, тужурок, что было совершенно непонятно, как они держатся. Я снял пальто и бросил его в угол около решетки. Постепенно разглядел камеру. Это была большая, почти квадратная комната, около семидесяти квадратных метров. Потолок — слегка сводчатый, поддерживаемый посередине двумя тонкими металлическими столбами.

1. Арест

Записки «вредителя». Часть II. Тюрьма. 1. Арест

После опубликования постановления ГПУ о расстреле «48-ми» я не сомневался в том, что буду арестован. В постановлении о расстреле В. К. Толстого указывалось — «руководитель вредительства по Северному району» (это был мой ближайший друг); при таком же объявлении относительно С. В. Щербакова — «руководитель контрреволюционной организации в Севгосрыбтресте» (это был самый близкий мне человек из работников треста). Было очевидно, что спешно расстреляв «руководителей вредительской организации», далее будут искать «организацию», а так как никакой организации не было, то будут подбирать людей, наиболее подходящих для этого, по мнению ГПУ. В «Севгосрыбтресте», кроме Щербакова, был пока арестован только К. И. Кротов, который уже более полугода находился в тюрьме. Явно, что для «организации» этого было мало. Из оставшихся в «Севгосрыбтресте» специалистов, занимавших ответственные должности, было четверо, заведующих отделами: Н. Скрябин — заведующий планово-статистическим отделом, инженеры К. и П. — отделами техническим и рационализаторским, и я — научно-исследовательским. Главный инженер сменился в 1930 году и еще ничего не успел построить, так как ввиду беспрестанных изменений планов, строительных работ в 1930 году, в сущности, не было. Из кого ГПУ будет формировать уже объявленную «организацию» в «Севгосрыбтресте»? Несомненно, что меня должны взять в первую очередь: моя дружба с В. К. Толстым и С. В.